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  1. #1
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    Default 6 Tornado myths

    Howdy from deep in the heart of Tornado Alley where we grow our own tornadoes. I got these 6 tornado myths from State Farm. I think they have enough experience with tornadoes through their claims to know what the real deal is. It is in their best interests to tell you what reduces the probability of injury/damage.

    Myth 1:*Opening windows equalizes air pressure and helps prevent the roof from being ripped off.
    Fact:*This act does little or nothing to prevent damage and wastes precious minutes in an emergency.
    Tip:*The powerful winds of a tornado can shatter windows. Help avoid injuries caused by flying, broken glass by taking shelter in a windowless room.

    Myth 2:*Taking shelter under an overpass during a tornado will protect me.
    Fact:*Overpasses and bridges can actually concentrate airflow from a tornado and become dangerous "wind tunnels." Hiding under an overpass may subject you to severe injuries from flying debris or even cause you to be blown out into the storm itself.
    Tip:*While not an ideal solution, it may be safer to find a low spot, such as a ditch, and lie face down with your hands covering your head.

    Myth 3:*The safest place to hide in a storm is the southwest corner of the basement.
    Fact: A corner is often safer than against the middle of a long wall, which may be vulnerable to collapse in a tornado. A better bet is to gather in a small, windowless interior room on the lowest floor in a home.
    Tip:*Protect yourself from flying and falling debris by taking shelter under a heavy desk, mattress or sturdy stairwell.

    Myth 4:*Tornadoes are easy to spot.
    Fact:*A tornado may not be visible until it has picked up sufficient dirt and debris. Waiting to take shelter until you can actually see a funnel cloud puts you at risk.
    Tip:*Listen to weather reports for tornado warnings. A warning tells you a tornado has been spotted on radar or visually and that you should seek shelter immediately.

    Myth 5:*I could outrun a tornado in my car.
    Fact:*It's never a good idea to try. The average ground speed of a tornado is 30 mph, but its winds can exceed 200 mph. Even if you're able to stay ahead of the funnel cloud, you could find yourself driving through drenching downpours and flying debris. You might also encounter downed power lines, trees, and other dangerous obstacles in the road.
    Tip:*While it does not recommend escaping a tornado by car, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) says if you are in open country and the tornado is distant, it may be possible to drive out of harm's way. After detecting the direction of the storm's movement, drive at a right angle away from the tornado.

    Myth 6:*Tornadoes never strike here.
    Fact:*While some areas have a greater likelihood of tornadoes, these dangerous storms have occurred in every state in the U.S., in both urban and rural areas, and over land, mountains, and water. Never assume a particular location will be spared and always heed tornado warnings when they are issued.
    Tip:*Even if tornadoes are rare in your area, develop an emergency plan and practice it with your family.

    More information about staying safe during a tornado is available from the*National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)*and the*American Red Cross.

    Don't let superstition, myths, and what this or that good ole boy said keep you from doing what you need to do to be safe.

    Pat
    Never wrestle with a pig (however titled) as you just get dirty and the pig has all the fun.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Thanks for posting Patrick_g.. I am 57 and have never actually seen one of the things in person.. I have been very near them, but it is always been so dark and the rain coming down so hard, that it has been impossible to actually see anything. I have seen plenty of the aftermath.

    James K0UA
    James KUA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN


  3. #3
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Good tips. Living in the NE we don't see them often, but I've been through one in VT of all places, and hiding in the basement as quickly as possible is very good advice. We lost every tree, 2 cars and part of our roof, but luckily escaped any injuries to us our our animals!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Quote Originally Posted by k0ua View Post
    Thanks for posting Patrick_g.. I am 57 and have never actually seen one of the things in person.. I have been very near them, but it is always been so dark and the rain coming down so hard, that it has been impossible to actually see anything. I have seen plenty of the aftermath.

    James K0UA
    James, My mom was born and raised in Oklahoma aka tornado alley but the only tornado she ever saw was in Lima, Ohio. Some folks don't realize there have been tornadoes in every state, including Alaska and Hawaii. Tornadoes can strike in any month, not just in "tornado season."

    One of the myths listed mentions basement corners. Depends on your basement but most basements do have stairs and in the basement under the stairs is a pretty good place as the stairs are strong and will offer protection from debris you might not have in a corner.

    My basement is a walkout basement with oodles of glass in the south wall. Since it has a heavily reinforced concrete ceiling (a mat of rebar plus monolithic beams on 24 inch centers with pairs of 1 inch rebar ) the ceiling is secure. To be safe in my basement you need to get out of sight of the glass. A good way to do that is to enter the guest bedroom there and close the interior steel shutters over the window and close the HD steel door and lock the three deadbolts.

    Our ground floor master suite is a safe room as it is constructed of ICF with 8 inches of steel reinforced concrete in the walls and more in the ceiling. The master bedroom and bath both have interior steel storm shutters which if the weather warrants we close and secure. We then turn off our NOAA weather radio and get a good night's sleep uninterrupted by dire warnings about the weather and the need to go to shelter.

    Another good tip is to know where you can shelter if need be when you are out and about. Many municipal buildings were constructed during the cold war and have spaces that were designated for civil defense bomb shelters. These are handy for tornado shelters. Our local high school has an underground shelter which to deter vandalism is kept locked so is unavailable when school is not in session.

    Having grown up around folks who had a passing interest in tornado survival but little or no verifiable scientifically valid information I heard a lot of junk regarding tornado weather, the color of the sky, favored direction of travel of tornadoes, tornado season and on and on most of which was bunk. FEMA promulgates the real deal. the nation's severe weather center for NOAA is located at Norman, Oklahoma just 40 miles or so from me. They know more about severe weather than anyone else you can think of.

    Here is an interesting statistic from them:

    The odds of a residential structure receiving significant tornadic damage in the region referred to as tornado alley is on the order of once per 4,000 years. Why then do I concern myself? Well, what if this is our year? Also, even though the odds of being hit by a tornado is not too great the result of being hit if you are is deadly to people and devastating to traditional stick built structures.

    Other low probability dangers include being killed my an asteroid/meteor, about 1 in 700,000. or by lightning, 576,000 to one. Recent lottery winner was hit by lightning. Note: the odds of being hit by lightning are much greater than winning the lottery.

    Odds of being murdered: 18,000 to 1, Odds of being the victim of serious crime in your lifetime: 20 to 1. Looks to me the odds argue strongly in favor of needing means of self protection such as a concealed firearm.

    Pat AF5CK
    Never wrestle with a pig (however titled) as you just get dirty and the pig has all the fun.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Quote Originally Posted by patrick_g View Post
    Looks to me the odds argue strongly in favor of needing means of self protection such as a concealed firearm.

    Pat AF5CK
    From a post about Tornadoes to concealed handgun justification in 1.2 seconds.... lol.
    Tim.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Quote Originally Posted by tcartwri View Post
    From a post about Tornadoes to concealed handgun justification in 1.2 seconds.... lol.
    I didn't start to say anything about self protection gunwise but... it just sort of hit me we are always hearing about being lightning safe, tornado safe, etc. BUT when you look at the odds of these events it makes you wonder. The odds of being a serious crime victim is much much more likely than being hit by lightning or killed by lightning which is extremely low probability.

    I'm all for lightning safety. As a ham I have lightning rods (antennas) connected to my indoor equipment by nice heavy wires (coax) so I am interested. I live in the heart of tornado alley so I am interested but the odds of being killed by lightning (although greater for me than the average person) is way way less than being the victim of a serious crime. So to respond properly to reality I need to spend more effort preparing to avoid being a crime victim than preparing for tornadoes or lightning. Luckily I am well prepared in all the above but plenty of citizens are not prepared to defend themselves against being a victim of serious crime and the Government emphasis remains solely on storms, lightning, and such not on prevention of the much more likely danger.

    I think this political correctness is fostered and supported by groups with an agenda in mind and safety of the public isn't it.

    Patrick
    Never wrestle with a pig (however titled) as you just get dirty and the pig has all the fun.

  7. #7
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Quote Originally Posted by patrick_g View Post
    I didn't start to say anything about self protection gunwise but... it just sort of hit me we are always hearing about being lightning safe, tornado safe, etc. BUT when you look at the odds of these events it makes you wonder. The odds of being a serious crime victim is much much more likely than being hit by lightning or killed by lightning which is extremely low probability.

    I'm all for lightning safety. As a ham I have lightning rods (antennas) connected to my indoor equipment by nice heavy wires (coax) so I am interested. I live in the heart of tornado alley so I am interested but the odds of being killed by lightning (although greater for me than the average person) is way way less than being the victim of a serious crime. So to respond properly to reality I need to spend more effort preparing to avoid being a crime victim than preparing for tornadoes or lightning. Luckily I am well prepared in all the above but plenty of citizens are not prepared to defend themselves against being a victim of serious crime and the Government emphasis remains solely on storms, lightning, and such not on prevention of the much more likely danger.

    I think this political correctness is fostered and supported by groups with an agenda in mind and safety of the public isn't it.

    Patrick
    Sounds like we have a lot in common.
    Tractors, amateur radio, guns, political beliefs.
    have you noticed what seems like an extra ordinary amount of hams on this forum? the ratio to the general population is very low, but there are a bunch of us here. Most don't post their callsigns, but they are here none the less

    James K0UA
    James KUA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN


  8. #8
    Elite Member jonyyuma's Avatar
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Being a Ham does tie into be a survivalist/ does it not? the other stuff listed fits with it. I don't broadcast , but I have friends that do.
    Okay, Legal disclaimer: Old but not senile, definitely do not have the answer to everything!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Quote Originally Posted by jonyyuma View Post
    Being a Ham does tie into be a survivalist/ does it not? the other stuff listed fits with it. I don't broadcast , but I have friends that do.
    Actually there was a recent TV show where survivalists and a ham were interviewed. The ham made it clear he and his hobby were there to make contributions to disaster management and civil emergency communications assistance but were otherwise virtually totally distinct from what is thought as survivalist.

    I strongly concur. It is two separate things and I for one strongly oppose the erroneous idea that hams are by their activities and capabilities somehow aligned with what is traditionally thought of as survivalist.

    Where survival and hams overlap on the Venn diagram is where hams volunteer their time, abilities, expertise and equipment to assist with emergency communications. In doing this they might help folks SURVIVE.

    Any connection between "SURVIVALIST" groups and hams is purely coincidental but it is conceivable that a survivalist could get a ham lisc. Lots of folks have been able to get a lisc. I talked to a lady lawyer ham at Jonestown a few months prior to the Koolaid party, sort of the antithesis of survival, huh?.

    Patrick AF5CK
    Never wrestle with a pig (however titled) as you just get dirty and the pig has all the fun.

  10. #10
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: 6 Tornado myths

    Quote Originally Posted by patrick_g View Post
    Actually there was a recent TV show where survivalists and a ham were interviewed. The ham made it clear he and his hobby were there to make contributions to disaster management and civil emergency communications assistance but were otherwise virtually totally distinct from what is thought as survivalist.

    I strongly concur. It is two separate things and I for one strongly oppose the erroneous idea that hams are by their activities and capabilities somehow aligned with what is traditionally thought of as survivalist.

    Where survival and hams overlap on the Venn diagram is where hams volunteer their time, abilities, expertise and equipment to assist with emergency communications. In doing this they might help folks SURVIVE.

    Any connection between "SURVIVALIST" groups and hams is purely coincidental but it is conceivable that a survivalist could get a ham lisc. Lots of folks have been able to get a lisc. I talked to a lady lawyer ham at Jonestown a few months prior to the Koolaid party, sort of the antithesis of survival, huh?.

    Patrick AF5CK
    Agree 100%.. by the way I tried to find an old QSL card from a contact at Jonestown, but was unable.. but I did find their logbook. on line at some FBI site once. I downloaded it but could not find my qso in it. but I havent looked through all of it. It is photocopied page by page, and some of the operators had pretty bad hand writeing, so it is hard to go through. What a needless tragedy. I did not think much about the contact back all those years ago.

    James K0UA
    James KUA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN


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