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  1. #1
    Super Member newbury's Avatar
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    Default Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    I've got lots of places with small (<1" diameter) to medium (< 3" diameter) branches getting close to house power lines, generally 200 amp service, and 5 houses/buildings.

    I've had the power company come out for one medium branch, took 3 hours for the guy to get there, He just moved the bucket near, donned a heavy pair of gloves and took the branch off the line.

    A lot of the branches that are within 10' of the power lines I could trim with a pole saw from the ground. And I would have when I was young and stupid. Now that I am old and stupid I'd like to do it with more safety equipment.

    So I was looking into what I call "linemans gloves" and boots, and maybe a rubber apron.

    Like I wrote the lines are running household power to a 200 amp or less breaker panel.

    What would be the needed "class" of protection?
    Electrical safety glove basics | Supply Line Direct

    Q on electrical safety gloves and boots-475758a701ea4f70a6c5ea09662dfd59-jpg

    1,000 volts?
    500 volts?

    Thanks in advance.
    My rides - '95 Kubota M4700 w/ PEC, LA1001 FEL :'07 B7610, LA352 FEL, Bush Hog SBX 48 box blade, '09 Woods BH70-X w/ 16" bucket and thumb, 3pt pallet forks, Dale Phillips PHD, Jinma 8" chipper, 2 Piranha's, Winco 12KW PTO generator, Howse plow, 5' KK tiller, 5' Big Bee cutter, with a 2002 7.3L Ford F350 CC DRW 4x4 and '07 18' Hudson HSE Deluxe trailer - 5 Ton to haul it all
    My saws - JD CS 62, efco 3500, Stihls - 021, 660 w/woods mod, 660 w/ DP muffler, 088, Woodmizer LT10

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Treemonkey1000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    You want the highest rating we use 2500Volt gloves for stuff at my job. Then leather outer gloves to protect from holes and cuts.. But as a rule you shouldn't be close to the uninsulated lines on the poles. Depending on the line you may have 14,000 lines being stepped down eventually to your 110V. Arc flash distance is about 5' for those lines. Since you are dealing with the stepped down voltage 1000 volt gloves could work. To test them blow some air in them then spin them around the open end of the gloves to seal them up and see if the air leaks out.. If you have a way to shut off the power safely start that way..
    1st Peter 1:6-9

  3. #3
    Super Member Mace Canute's Avatar
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    The service to your house is 120 volts to ground, 240 volts phase to phase. A good clean pair of DRY leather gloves was all that was required for working on those voltages when I was a Journeyman Lineman. If your gloves get damp with sweat, they will probably become conductive. If you can find a set of rubber linesman's gloves, they will definitely work. Watch out for small holes in them though, if they are used. Of course if your service is triplex conductor, the hot legs are insulated and it's as safe to handle as an extension cord, just watch out for bare spots on the insulation if it's been rubbing on tree branches. If it's open wire secondary, absolutely do not cross phase them...if you do, you run the risk of them burning themselves down or welding themselves together not to mention the flash you will receive from the arc...it can be minimal or it can be quite severe. That could also start a fire if the sparks and molten metal fall on combustible material. You don't say if these are rural residences or in town but in town, you could burn the service conductors down and not blow the transformer fuse, it could look at the fault as just another load in which case it's possible to have energized conductors hanging down or laying on the ground.

    Remember, you need to keep any parts of your body or equipment you are using 10 feet minimum clearance from the higher voltage lines that feed the transformer.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member Treemonkey1000's Avatar
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    Go with Mace Canutes wisdom
    1st Peter 1:6-9

  5. #5
    Super Member CompactTractorFan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    I don't think it's a good idea. There are some things that are better left to the professionals.
    Kyle - CompactTractorFan

    Kubota BX25 w/R4's (23 hp, 17.7 PTO hp), Loader, Backhoe, 60" Mid Mount Mower, Cyclone Rake Z-10 Lawn Vacuum, CountyLine Carryall, Ferris 48" Walk-Behind Mower, Honda 21" Walk-Behind Mower, Mighty Mac 4" Chipper/Shredder,
    2000 Dodge Intrepid, 2012 Ford F-150 EcoBoost

  6. #6
    Platinum Member Steave's Avatar
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    Just like Mace Canute said. We just wore clean dry leather gloves when removing limbs from service drops and that was mostly because of flash hazard not just shock hazard. Flash hazard was what always concerned me. If and when something goes wrong a violent flash occurs and small pieces of hot metal go everywhere. I've seen folks glasses spotted and pitted from the flash particles and seen 2 people with burnt fingers caused by flash. The insulated gloves won't hurt but all you need is leather gloves and common sense.
    I've got a cutting torch and a welder sooo YEAH it'll fit!!

  7. #7
    Silver Member
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    Pictures would be nice. Electrical aside, are the branches overhanging the lines or approaching the lines. If they are over the top you might be better off just letting someone else take the liability. If you are raising too many "what if questions" in your mind that is a pretty good indication to let the pro do it. Consider, if you lose control of one branch and it rips the wires off the house and meter, what will that cost to repair? My brother is a lineman and when I see people with no training considering delving into a field with this much potential for disaster it makes me cringe. Again some pictures would be nice. Good luck on whichever way you go.

    Take Care,
    Doug in SW IA

  8. #8
    Super Member newbury's Avatar
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    Thanks for the advice -
    None of the limbs I'm thinking of pruning would have enough mass to rip the line. None are near a pole. I had planned on the gloves with the leather covers to prevent "leaks".

    When I had a fuse box switched to a circuit breaker box job done on 1 house by an electrician he just put on heavy gloves, a rubber apron, and rubber boots when he pulled the meter off while the power was HOT.

    It would be nice to have a licensed professional do it in a timely manner. However most instances it's call 3 firms, go to the site, wait hours to get someone to finally show for a bid, then adapt to their schedule. And pay them 1/10 of my retirement check for a 1 hour job.

    Whereas if I've got the tools (PPE and a good fiberglass pole saw) it's 1/10 of my retirement check for the tools plus my time the first time, then after that just my time. And my time only involves driving to the house, donning PPE, and clipping a few errant limbs. And being retired it gets me away from SWMBO with a valid excuse.

    They are triplex conductor service drops, and I'll be VERY careful of bare spots.

    Now is the Silky Todoku Fiberglass Pole Saw (Bailey's - Silky Todoku Fiberglass Pole Saw - XL Teeth) worth $430?

    DANGER! RISK OF ELECTROCUTION! DO NOT USE THIS FIBERGLASS POLE SAW WITHIN 50 FEET (15 METERS) OF POWER LINES OR ELECTRICAL WIRES.
    My rides - '95 Kubota M4700 w/ PEC, LA1001 FEL :'07 B7610, LA352 FEL, Bush Hog SBX 48 box blade, '09 Woods BH70-X w/ 16" bucket and thumb, 3pt pallet forks, Dale Phillips PHD, Jinma 8" chipper, 2 Piranha's, Winco 12KW PTO generator, Howse plow, 5' KK tiller, 5' Big Bee cutter, with a 2002 7.3L Ford F350 CC DRW 4x4 and '07 18' Hudson HSE Deluxe trailer - 5 Ton to haul it all
    My saws - JD CS 62, efco 3500, Stihls - 021, 660 w/woods mod, 660 w/ DP muffler, 088, Woodmizer LT10

  9. #9
    Gold Member wyeguy's Avatar
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    Ford 1100

    Default

    "Lineman's gloves", regardless of the class, are maintained and regularly tested by professionals, as are the rest if their hotline tools. If an amateur attempts this work, I recommend plenty of life insurance for their family. Sooner or later your luck will run out.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Q on electrical safety gloves and boots

    Quote Originally Posted by newbury View Post
    I've got lots of places with small (<1" diameter) to medium (< 3" diameter) branches getting close to house power lines, generally 200 amp service, and 5 houses/buildings.

    I've had the power company come out for one medium branch, took 3 hours for the guy to get there, He just moved the bucket near, donned a heavy pair of gloves and took the branch off the line.

    A lot of the branches that are within 10' of the power lines I could trim with a pole saw from the ground. And I would have when I was young and stupid. Now that I am old and stupid I'd like to do it with more safety equipment.

    So I was looking into what I call "linemans gloves" and boots, and maybe a rubber apron.

    Like I wrote the lines are running household power to a 200 amp or less breaker panel.

    What would be the needed "class" of protection?
    Electrical safety glove basics | Supply Line Direct

    Q on electrical safety gloves and boots-475758a701ea4f70a6c5ea09662dfd59-jpg

    1,000 volts?
    500 volts?

    Thanks in advance.
    If the trees are between the transformer and before the meter isn't it the power company to be called.
    it is thiers until meter is installed. then your responcibility.
    Rubber gloves are used by those who under stand the reason needed.

    Remember no body wants you to look like fried bacon.

    ken

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