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  1. #1

    Default Safety Tips

    An accident happens all of a sudden in milliseconds, usually without any warning. Therefore you have very little reaction time. By the time you realize what is happening, it's over and there is no reversal, no second chances. A tractor can flip over backwards in 3/4 of a second. When your senses are keen, sharp, wide awake, normal reaction time is 1/2 second... not much room for error.

    So the only way to combat the "unknown", is to practice safety and constantly do the "what if" in your mind at all times. In other words, know what you're going to do "before" it happens... to prevent it from happening.

    If you see some safety write-ups, post them here, so we can all practice safety with our equipment.

    Ironically, this attachment is about PTO Safety from last month's issue of Massey Ferguson magazine.

    Remember, you normally will not get a second chance to get it right around ag equipment. Not following safety measures the first time, often produces tragic and irreversible results.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -34-31618-pto720-jpg  

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    532
    Location
    SE Michigan - between Pontiac and Flint
    Tractor
    Kubota B7100 HST - 1995

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    Great thoughts on safe operation. The article you included provides some startling information on how quickly PTO accidents can happen.......with devastating results.

    Safety can never be an afterthought. Around tractors and equipment, slow and thoughtful is the only way to work.

    Bob Pence

  3. #3

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    Here's a link for POST HOLE DIGGER Safety:

    http://www.farmequip.org/phdsafe.htm


    Have the Kids look at this:

    http://www.farmequip.org/SafeFrame.htm


  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    184
    Location
    Gig Harbor, WA.
    Tractor
    JD 4300HST 4x4

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    JohnMillerIII

    Very good stuff. I was wondering how to teach the kids some of this stuff - and myself too. I'll have them reads these. Very valuable info. Thanks

    Jerry

  5. #5

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    from North Dakota State University
    NDSU Extension Service :


    PTO Entanglements
    North Dakota usually has from four to six PTO entanglements per year that result in severe injury or death. There are many more entanglements, however, that result in someone's clothing being partially or completely torn off. This can result in severe skin burns when the clothing tightens up as it is pulled from the body.

    Most farmers don't have to try too hard to remember someone who has been caught by an unshielded PTO shaft. Some older people will chuckle about a long-past entanglement. But that chuckle is more of a nervous reaction than true humor. PTO entanglement is not funny!

    Any machine that is powered by an unshielded PTO shaft is dangerous. The brand of machinery has nothing to do with its safety, if the PTO is not shielded. You can work with any color of machinery you wish; red, green, blue, yellow, orange -- take your choice -- if the PTO shield is missing, it is dangerous!


    How Can You Be Safe When Using PTO Shafts?
    First, make sure the shaft is shielded. This includes the driveline shield that covers the implement driveline, and the master shield which covers the universal joint and PTO stub shaft on the tractor.
    Maintain the shield so it can work for you. PTO driveline shields are usually mounted on bearings, so they need to be maintained. Always REPLACE the shield when it is damaged or missing.
    Next, keep a safe distance from it when in use. Keep others away, too. How far? A distance of twice your height is a good start.
    Allow only those who absolutely must be in the area to be there. Keep all children away!
    Always pay attention to what is happening. Most PTO victims were caught by surprise.
    If something goes wrong -- stop the machinery; take the PTO out of gear, stop the engine and set the brake. Put the keys in your pocket before working on the machinery.
    When stopping the machinery for any reason -- end of work, lunch, repairs, or communication -- take the PTO out of gear, stop the engine and set the brake.


    More Thoughts About PTO Shafts and Shields
    The average replacement PTO shield should cost less than $50 according to North Dakota implement dealers, and will take less than two hours to install.
    Can you get an ambulance ride to the hospital for less than $50?
    How much health/hospitalization insurance can you buy for $50?
    Can you buy an artificial arm or leg for $50 or less?
    Can you buy a funeral for less than $50?
    Can you look at a picture of your wife or family and say that PTO shields are not worth the cost or effort?
    A replacement PTO shield is simply the cheapest insurance you can buy. The time spent to install and maintain a PTO shield is clearly the most valuable and productive time you can spend in your life!


  6. #6

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    A very well written article/site on Tractor Safety:

    http://www.ageng.ndsu.nodak.edu/EXTE...TY/TRACTOR.HTM


  7. #7
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    38,363
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    <font color=blue>Some older people will chuckle about a long-past entanglement. But that chuckle is more of a nervous reaction than true humor. PTO entanglement is not funny</font color=blue>

    How true. The closest neighbor behind me (69 years old) has 5 tractors and told me a long time ago about hooking up his brush hog in the days when double knit slacks were popular. His wife had company in the house when he walked in the back door wearing only his BVDs and one leg of his slacks; the other leg had gotten caught in the PTO driveline and ripped off one half of his pants. They laugh about it now, but it sure wasn't funny when it happened.

    Bird

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    425
    Location
    New York state
    Tractor
    Kubota B1700 HST

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    John - thanks for the great information. One thing I can add from personal experience is that when you have something heavy spinning at 540 rpm, it takes an amazingly long time to stop spinning even AFTER you shut off the pto. Last summer I was just getting used to my rear mounted rotary mower, and I shut off the pto, got off the tractor, and went around the back to check on the mower height - must have been 30 or 45 seconds by the time I disengaged everything, undid the seatbelt, and got back there to look, and the blade was still spinning FAST - would have taken the toes off my foot in an instant if I had accidently shoved a shoe too close.


  9. #9
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    38,363
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    PaulB, one thing that reduces the time it takes that mower to stop spinning is to idle the tractor first before disengaging the PTO (which I always do). But of course, you could still get off the tractor and get back there before it stops turning and as heavy as those blades are, they wouldn't have to be turning very fast to take a foot off.

    Bird

  10. #10

    Default Re: Safety Tips

    Safety is no accident...

    Load your printer up with paper and printout this Tractor Safety Course :

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nasd/docs7/on99004.html


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