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  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    38
    Location
    Southwestern Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Cub Cadet 1050 LXT

    Default Re: You're method of 'chaining'

    I use to lay them out flat, drive on them and then lock them in place..but I was never REALLY happy with how tight I could, or in this case, couldn't get them...and not centered well. I have since started jacking up the rear end of my garden tractor, and "rolling" the chains onto each tire...I also deflate the tires a bit, so they are soft...I then install the chains, and then reinflate the tires to about 2psi under max pressure. This keeps the chains nice and tight, and I never have any problems on my driveway.

  2. #22
    Veteran Member lhfarm's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,200
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Tractor
    NH TC40DA

    Default Re: You're method of 'chaining'

    I think the answer for the best method really depends on the factors the OP posted. On my little Cub, I can just toss the chains over the top of the tire. Plenty of clearance and not much weight. On the TC40DA, I hook a bungee cord between the wheel slots, drive forward, get off a couple of times to make sure they are straight, but have no heavy lifting to do. I think all these methods have their place.
    Barry
    Lawson Hill Farm
    NH TC40DA
    '64 IH Cub Lo-Boy
    '47 Willys Jeep CJ2a w/ PTO
    '49 Willys Jeep CJ3a w/ PTO & 3pt lift
    http://www.farmjeep.com/

  3. #23
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    95
    Location
    Cape Breton, Canada
    Tractor
    Kubota B7510

    Default Re: You're method of 'chaining'

    I haven't put chains on tractor since I got the 4wd in 2008. With the 2wd if I would drive on chains and pull them up over. Now I use the chains for temporary tractions. In fact I leave them in the truck for weigth and traction if needed. I have used them to get the truck or a neighbour unstuck more times than the tractor. Having used 2wd for many years, you are a lot 'smarter' about what you do and where you go so if you do get the 4wd stuck, you're in for a battle.

    If your wheels are spinning (tractor or vehicle), if you lay your chains out flat in front of (or behind) your drive wheels and drive up on them most of the time it will get you out. (Don't have a heavy foot on the gas or you'll spit them out pretty quick.) If I go to the neighbours to blow snow I'll throw a shovel and the chains in the bucket and go. More than once had to use them for temporary traction.
    Donnie

  4. #24
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    18,044
    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: You're method of 'chaining'

    I think my first challenge will be to find those chains under the snow we just got!
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

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