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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    Default how many gallons per tire

    i have a 2410 with 31x15.50 15 terra tires, been searching and found one figure that says 17 gals per tire. does any one know for sure? any help would be appreciated

  2. #2
    Veteran Member gerard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,681
    Location
    Syracuse NY
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT w/FEL

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    Can't say for sure but there are charts from tire services that will give you the answer or check with your local tractor store that fills tires. It's not that crucial as long as you don't fill more than 75% full. Have to leave some room for air to compress as a cushion. Many people only go 50% cause that keeps all the weight below the axel and below the C of G. You can always add with the tire jacked, then spin the tire until the valve stem is at your desired fill level. When fluid comes out your all set.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    2,518
    Location
    Capital District, Upstate New York
    Tractor
    Satoh S650G, MF135, MF165, JD5205

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    According to Goodyear Ag charts @ 75% fill:

    31x15.50-15NHS - 20 gallons for 166 lbs. wt. gain per unit...

  4. #4
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    thanks john and gerard. i am on my way to kmart to pick up the ww fluid. i checked at our local walmart for the fluid transfer pump that goes on a power drill but they said they no longer carry it. i think harbor freight does so i'll check there.

  5. #5
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    Home Depot and hardware stores around here have those drill pumps.

    You might try a hardware store in your area or a home depot if you have one. These pumps are common and cheap at about $6 each.

    Bill in Pgh, PA

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    965
    Location
    Tescott, Kansas
    Tractor
    Kubota M6040/cab

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    I went to NAPA auto parts and they had one for $8.39

  7. #7
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    Just and update on my project. filled the tires today, took 16 gallons per tire. but had to lower tire pressure to about 6lbs to get a good print. used a drill pump from NAPA. cost 5 bucks. so the hole project only cost 21$. abbed about 175lbs (i think) thanks for the advice from all

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    104
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    JD 4200, JD B, JD 50

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    I have got to think that filling your tire to 75% is safer than filling it to 50%. I would be more concerned at 50% because you would have way too much room for water to slosh around inside the tire. There is no guarantee that the water will remain below the C of G. It is not so much the angle of your tractor that will cause rollovers it is an abrupt change in direction(acceleration). Water bouncing around inside your tire will cause moment of inertia changes to your tractor profile and probably move your center of gravity around as well. An easy scenario to picture is that you drop one rear tire in a hole and the other side begins sloshing around. At the same time you inadvertantly turn the wheel to the high side and you are gone because the momentum of the water in the high side wheel will likely send you spinning.

  9. #9
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    39,423
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    Green, I think you're being perfectly logical in your thinking of a liquid sloshing around in any container and the results you can get; however, I also think that the volume or space in a tractor tire is so small in relation to the total size and weight of the tractor, and the speed at which tractors travel, that your scenario just won't happen. In other words, I don't think there's any greater danger from a 50% filled tire than from a 75% filled tire. I filled the tires on my last tractor to the 75% level and think that it improved both traction and stability to some degree, but driving wide open, stopping quick, etc. would have never let the operator know whether there was liquid in the tires or not (there's just not enough space in there for you to notice any sloshing). A neighbor bought a much larger farm tractor used, and never knew it had liquid in the tires until he punctured one (it was filled with calcium which all leaked out). And while I certainly would not recommend it, he continued using that tractor with calcium in one rear tire and none in the other for a couple of years before the other tire got a puncture and lost its calcium. And I used that tractor a considerable amount myself and never "felt" any difference.

  10. #10
    Silver Member ELMO67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    217
    Location
    CT.
    Tractor
    KUBOTA L3010

    Default Re: how many gallons per tire

    I have a different size tire on my L3010, but here is what I came up with. I estimated the gallons required based on a chart I printed from Tractorsmart.com. My rear tire size is a std. R4. 420/70-24. The qty. I thought would be correct was 60 gals., but it actually only took 48 gallons, that is with no weight on the rear tires, the stem at 12 o'clock, and fluid slightly dribbling out of the stem which told me it was full. The fluid I used was the wwsolvent from K-mart that was on sale for $.50 a gallon. Each gallon weighed 7 lbs., for a total added weight of 336 lbs. I used a tire fill adapter from my local NAPA dealer, it is supposed to let you bleed out the air while filling- it doesn't. What I ended up doing was to take a 4 ft. section of garden hose, a funnel that would just jam into the end of it, and a garden hose ball valve adapter fitted between the hose and the fill adapter. This let me shut off the flow of fluid into the tire, and bleed all the air out of the tire as needed (every 2-2 1/2 gallons). I taped the funnel to the side of the ROPS with electrical tape, the funnel sat into the recess on the ROPS . I also found out that it was quicker to remove the bleeder valve from the adapter ( it is held in and sealed with an o-ring, finger tight seals just fine). If I had to do it again, I would use the same adapter from NAPA and Y adapter with a hose for a vent ,up to the top, next to the fill funnel. This would allow for a much larger vent area, and with a clamp at the top, I wouldn't have to climb down off the ladder to close a valve and vent the system. Doing it the way I did, it took almost four hours to complete the job. After filling the tires and adding 20 lbs. of air, I took it for a test drive. It really made a big difference using the ft. end loader, the rear tires didn't spin at all going into a big pile of partially frozen gravel, and, more importantly , the rear tires don't come up off of the ground if I lower the bucket suddenly. I hope this info helps someone out, now I just have to put on my chains and I'm sure the snow will stay away this year!

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