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  1. #11
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    795
    Location
    New England...Central MA
    Tractor
    TC35D/16LA

    Default Re: Tire loading

    OkieG,

    You said "IF a 75% fill covers the "steel stuff", The "slosh effect" would certainly expose metal to the 25% that was air, wouldn't it?"

    I hate getting into these quasi-science type issues....but for proof, if you get a jar...fill it 75 % full with water....add a goldfish...cover tightly...the fish will suffocate ( I know you need to ignore food and waste toxicity, but you should get the point ). Remember that fish generally live in water that is exposed to air allowing for the O2 to mix and disolve with the water. Remove the exposure to oxygenated air and you eliminate the oxygen mixing.

    Also your comment that "A fluid fill that constantly has a portion of the steel rim exposed might be the worst case, but even with a 100% fill, I believe there could be enough O2 dissolved in the fluid to cause more rust than you would want." is also a bit incorect. The amout of oxygen in a sealed tire is finite. After the initial 'rusting' the available oxygen is gone, and the 'rusting' stops....for good !!

  2. #12

    Default Re: Tire loading

    I have been a tire dealer for 33 years and we sale 100s of rims per year to replace rims rusted from calciun. If you use calciun, USE a tube!! We have been useing Rim Guard, which is non-corrosive for 3-4 years. Works in tubeless tires. www.millertire.com

  3. #13
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,129
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Tractor
    Deere 855 (24hp/19@PTO)

    Default Re: Tire loading

    <font color=blue>I hate getting into these quasi-science type issues</font color=blue>

    I agree. My apologies for presenting a quasi-science type post.

    I have a lot of respect (and distain) for the destructive power of oxidation, but TC, you and the other posters have experience with filled tires, while I have none.

    It's just that I've seen cars rusted to undriveability when I lived up north. Fluid filled tires is a different subject, I know. But, when I read about intentional exposure of steel surfaces (painted or not) to corrosive material (ie CaCl), I jump on my soapbox before I think. I appreciate your input and that of the other responders. I stand corrected on the rust potential of limited O2 exposure. Better behavior is on my list of resolutions.

    Merry Christmas!

    OkieG

  4. #14
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    115
    Location
    Upstate NY/north of Syracuse
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610 HST

    Default Re: Tire loading


    I hate to go further down the science road, but the oxygen available for corrosion inside a tire is probably not finite. Rubber (as well as most plastics) are permiable to oxygen. If you look at radiant floor tubing, you'll note that they offer it with an oxygen barrier because oxygen will (slowly) pass through the wall of the tubing. The barrier is there to protect the cast iron boiler from corrosion.

    Note that this would not be enough oxygen to support a goldfish, but it is enough to support corrosion, particularly over a period of years.

    -Chris

  5. #15

    Default Re: Tire loading

    Merry Christmas!

    <font color=blue>Note that this would not be enough oxygen to support a goldfish, but it is enough to support corrosion, particularly over a period of years.</font color=blue>

    I'm sure you are right, but I would not assume that you get enough O2 passing through the tire wall of that thick rubber of the rear tires to make any significant difference at all.

    Bill in Pgh, PA

  6. #16

    Default Re: Tire loading

    edmiller... any idea where I could buy Rim Guard in the Western PA area? How much does it cost per gallon?

    I called a couple of tire dealers in the area and none of them have heard of the product. My Kubota dearler uses CaCl.

    Have you seen any rusted rims from winshield washer fluid?

    John

  7. #17
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    711
    Location
    Strasburg, OH

    Default Re: Tire loading

    This brings my post full circle and back to my original question.......".Have you seen any rusted rims from windshield washer fluid? ".............TOM
    .....

  8. #18
    Veteran Member chim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,924
    Location
    Lancaster County, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3200, Ford 1210

    Default Re: Tire loading

    I wouldn't worry too much about the oxygen getting in through the tire unless you figure out a way to run negative pressure in the tire[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img].................chim

  9. #19
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,129
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Tractor
    Deere 855 (24hp/19@PTO)

    Default Re: Tire loading

    Tom,

    Don't get discouraged from going "full circle". I have seen other straight-forward questions posed on this forum that have not received "to the point" answers. No one is intentionally ignoring you. As you probably have seen, sometimes responders choose to address the more general topic (ie tire loading) and sometimes the responses meander to other topics entirely. While this can be frustrating to the originator of the thread (you), it is part of the richness of TBN. Good information has been posted on your thread, even though your specific question has not been answered.

    The cumulative knowledge in the TBN membership (braintrust) is great. When a specific question does not receive a direct answer, the braintrust may be stumped. I say this because, when I asked my question:

    <font color=blue>Can any CaCl or windshield washer fluid users comment from experience?</font color=blue>

    (which was an attempt to refocus on your original question), the responses were direct and multiple regarding CaCl use, but no one talked about WW fluid. Windshield washer fluid may just be newly popular or so little used in the past for tire loading that no one has a handle on long term rust. However, enough pertintent peripheral information has been posted so that interpolation/extrapolation can provide you a reasonable answer anyway.

    It might be overkill to use tubes with WW fluid, but who cares? If it eliminates the possibility of a rusty rim, a pair of tubes would give you peace of mind.

    OkieG



  10. #20

    Default Re: Tire loading

    In response to JWE in Western PA area who wanted to find a local dealer for Rim Guard - call Dave at 724-668-7172 at Lone Maple Sales.

    We don't have any experience with people who have used windshield washer.

    We are in northwest Ohio if that would help anyone who wanted to pick up. www.millertire.com

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