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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    711
    Location
    Strasburg, OH

    Default Tire loading

    After reading many posts regarding the use of washer fluid for ballast I was wondering if the rims will rust if tubes are not used...sure think a couple tubes now would beat the cost of new rims 5 or 10 years down the road..... Also I am pricing a FEL from several different NH dealers and asked them to quote the cost of them loading the tires with washer fluid....The last dealer called back and said NH had issued a bulletin telling their dealers not to load tires ..Has anyone else heard this????? TOM

  2. #2

    Default Re: Tire loading

    I just bought a Kubota BX2200 and they said that they are not alowed to use windshield washer fluid because it can expload if subjected to high temperature (fire). They will only use calcium or foam.

    John

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    1,211
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Tractor
    2001 New Holland TC40D w/16LA loader

    Default Re: Tire loading

    TC40D owner's manual sez: (and I have summarized)

    <font color=blue>Liquid Ballast(optional): It is a common practice to add weight by filling the rear tires with liquid. CaCl2 and water solution is recommended due to its low freezing point and greater density (weight per gallon) than pure water.

    Never exceed the total recommended weight for the tractor. ...Tires should never be filled beyond 75%....</font color=blue>

    It looks ok to me.
    I would use a tube to protect the rim if I used CaCl2. I would probably use one for washer fluid as well as a backup.

    Mark

  4. #4
    Silver Member ELMO67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    215
    Location
    CT.
    Tractor
    KUBOTA L3010

    Default Re: Tire loading

    I just finished loading the rear tires on my L3010 with some "blue light special" washer solvent. I don't have tubes, and I'm really not concerned that the solvent will affect them, either, since it doesn't seem to have a major effect on automobile paint jobs. As far as an explosion, I was careful when filling the tires, I only could pour in a gallon at a time, no worse than filling the reservoir in my car. If it's flames that concern you, by the time they heat the solvent in my tires to the flash point, I don't think the condition of the rims will be on my mind![img]/w3tcompact/icons/eyes.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

  5. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    711
    Location
    Strasburg, OH

    Default Re: Tire loading

    I really wasn't concerned about the flames issue...Just concerned about the long term effect on the inside of the rims.........Tom

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    795
    Location
    New England...Central MA
    Tractor
    TC35D/16LA

    Default Re: Tire loading

    In theory, by filling the tire to about 75 % you have submerged the wheel ( steel stuff ) under "water" thereby eliminating most all of the available oxygen for corrosion. This is the concept that they've gone with for quite some years. Most of the rotten wheel stories occur when the fluid leaks out and air is added to the tire to compensate. Fresh oxygen + CaCL ( or even washer fluid for that matter ) = rust-a-rama.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,129
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Tractor
    Deere 855 (24hp/19@PTO)

    Default Re: Tire loading

    IF a 75% fill covers the "steel stuff", The "slosh effect" would certainly expose metal to the 25% that was air, wouldn't it?

    But, even more importantly, oxygen has no problem dissolving in liquids. It strives for equilibrium with the oxygen in the air.

    Fish are submerged and seem to find plenty of oxygen. A fluid fill that constantly has a portion of the steel rim exposed might be the worst case, but even with a 100% fill, I believe there could be enough O2 dissolved in the fluid to cause more rust than you would want.

    Can any CaCl or windshield washer fluid users comment from experience?

    OkieG

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    540
    Location
    Mukwonago, WI
    Tractor
    BX2200, '52 8N

    Default Re: Tire loading

    I have a '52 Ford 8N that has loader rears(CaCl) and the steel rims have not rusted through. They have been loaded for at least 30 years that I know of.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Tire loading

    HI,

    <font color=blue>
    IF a 75% fill covers the "steel stuff", The "slosh effect" would certainly expose metal to the 25% that was air, wouldn't it?
    </font color=blue>

    Yes, but the rims are painted...that will help. But even if they were not, there is not that much O2 in the small amount of air withing the filled tire.

    Air is 80% nitrogen. Metal exposed to the air outside the tire would have all the O2 needed to support continuous corrosion. Inside the tire the O2 would be depleted, and that would be the end of it. No way to make more unless the liquid would break down and supply it.

    Seems like WW fluid is a safe bet without using tubes...I have no idea how much rust that little bit of O2 might cause, but I am willing to live with it. Probably not more than a little surface rust at most.

    That is the way I see it anyway...[img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img]

    Bill in Pgh, PA

  10. #10
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    3,044
    Location
    Windham County, Conn
    Tractor
    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Tire loading

    The rears on both of my tractors are loaded. The Ford 2120 has a calcium solution (and has had for 14 years), There is some corrosion right around the valve stems, but none elsewhere on the rims. My new tractor, a NH TN75 has the rears loaded with a solution called Rim Guard, which is non corrosive and also non toxic. I believe it is a solution made from beet juice. It has the consistency of molasses and is sweet. When I punctured one of the tires, the replacement 70 gallons cost $160. On both of my tractors, the New Holland manuals tell you how to load the tires so I think they expect you to do it. My dealer loads the tires on almost all the New Hollands and Kubotas that they deliver.

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