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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    504
    Location
    Vermont, Franklin County
    Tractor
    NH1720, .

    Default Rear tire inflation

    Didn't know quite were to post this. I have a rear tire that looks a little soft and it got me to thinking. Do I need a special gage to measure the pressure and if I need air will my small compressor do the job? I have one of the ones you plug into the cigarette lighter. Common sense says to put the valve at the top since the tires are filled but after that I need help.
    I've had the tractor since April 2000 and I've never even thought of this.
    Thanks, [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]
    Al


  2. #2
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    39,596
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Alan, you can use a regular tire gauge, but since they usually register 40 psi or more, it can be a little more difficult to be exact (I run 12 psi in my rear tires). I bought a low pressure gauge myself, and then after I filled the tires with water and antifreeze, I also bought a liquid/air gauge. Getting water in a regular gauge will probably shorten its life. And I, too, want the valve stem on top when I check the pressure, and I always give mine a little blast of air to clear the valve stem before putting the gauge on it. However, you won't give it much of a blast with that 12 volt compressor. But that 12 volt compressor will do the job as far as airing up the tires; just takes longer is all.

    Bird

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    504
    Location
    Vermont, Franklin County
    Tractor
    NH1720, .

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Thanks for the reply Bird!![img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] As you can tell I don't have much experiance with tractors yet but that's why I like this site. Just ask and you shall recieve an answer.
    Once again Thanks and have a great day!!
    Al


  4. #4
    Veteran Member mikim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    2,416
    Location
    Paige Texas
    Tractor
    NH TC45

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Just be careful that you don't overheat it - 'cause it could be the end of it. I burned up my father-in-laws 12 volt trying to put air in my TC45 tires. I bought him a better one.


  5. #5
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    39,596
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    Texas

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Of course you're right, Mike, you can burn one up if it runs long enough. I figure if Al has liquid in the tires, and isn't going to run very high pressure, then they won't require a great volume of air. If you start with a tire that's completely flat, even on a car or pickup, most of those little 12 volt compressors take a long time.

    Bird

  6. #6
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    408
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Tractor
    Previously: Kubota B2710. Now Deere 3520

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Speaking of tire pressure. How often do you guys have to pump up the front tires. Mine go low after about 2 weeks. I fill them to 22psi, and in 2 weeks they're both at 15psi. The rear tires I never have to worry about. However, when they replaced the rear valve stems, they filled them to 30psi. I didn't notice for almost a year. Ride is much nicer now at 12!
    Todd


  7. #7
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    39,596
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Todd, sounds to me like you need to look for a slow leak. I've not had my front tires go down that way (except when I had a mesquite thorn in the right front one).

    Bird

  8. #8
    Veteran Member GlueGuy's Avatar
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    Jan 2001
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    1,659
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area California (CA)
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    Toddler,

    Sounds like you have a slow leak. The tires on Lucy have never needed to be filled. She's got about 50 hours on her now.

    But this brings up a good topic: Tire pressure. My tires are at about 40 PSI (all 4). Bird says he runs his at 12, and that would seem to help a lot in the traction department. What do others run in their tires?

    The GlueGuy

  9. #9
    Veteran Member gordon's Avatar
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    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,786
    Location
    Delaware
    Tractor
    L4310hst-loader-hydraulic top link

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    In my opinion that is way to high for the rear tires. But it also depends on your brand of tire. I've been changing the pressures in my rear tires and right now they are at 15 psi. Now the front is a different story with the added weight of a bucket full of wet sand and the smaller diameter of the tire.

    My tractor has the Firestone All traction utility 17.5L-24 , its a six ply r-4 tread with a load rating of 4400lbs at 20 psi. So I started with twenty psi and worked my way down to the fifteen psi that I'm at now. I'm also wondering what pressures/rear tire brand people are running.

    The lower pressure will give a better ride as well as alot less tire spin. Less tire spin less ruts, get the job done quicker and more comfortable as well.

    Gordon


  10. #10
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    39,596
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    Texas

    Default Re: Rear tire inflation

    GlueGuy, don't you have R4 tires? I have the R1s and my manual recommends 16 in the rear, 24 in the front. Maximum is 35 psi to seat the bead. I'm running 12 in the rear and 16 in the front; mowing, tilling, etc. with the front end loader off. I don't change the rear ones, but boost the front ones to 24 when I have the loader on.

    Bird

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