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  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    106
    Location
    Erie,Pa.
    Tractor
    Kubota L2350DT

    Default Tire chain damage

    I have never used chains before, received my set of rear chains and spring tensioners ( tirechains.com 2-link ladder)) for my 13.6-16 turfs. I put them on , but they seem a little crooked , looking at the view from the rim, but seem pretty snug. My main question is: Do loose chains damage the tire?. or can you ride on loose chains as long as they are not hitting the tractor anywhere?. I not sure how tight or loose chains need to be?. I figure tight as
    possible and how much slop is acceptable?.

  2. #2
    Gold Member Casco1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    422
    Location
    Eastern Mass
    Tractor
    Kubota L series

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    I just bought a set of chains today for my Kubota. The guy at the store said the rears should be as tight as possible, the fronts a bit loose. Because of steering a looser tire chain will give when the tire turns. He said to put the fronts on as tight as you can and not use stretchers this will leave enough play.

  3. #3
    Super Star Member Thomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    12,197
    Location
    Lebanon,NH.
    Tractor
    Kubota L2800HST w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    I have always run tight chains,if to loosen chain link can cause wear on the links,plus if you should get stuck and spin the tires chain could roll off. ;(

  4. #4
    Gold Member Casco1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    422
    Location
    Eastern Mass
    Tractor
    Kubota L series

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas
    I have always run tight chains,if to loosen chain link can cause wear on the links,plus if you should get stuck and spin the tires chain could roll off. ;(
    I agree with you, I was surprised at the advice, but he didn't say loose he said just loose enough to be able to squeeze your hand under the cross chain. I'm thinking I see his point if the chain is tight and you turn with the chain making ground contact it may tear up the tire. If there is a little play the chain could move a little and maybe save the tire. As far as wear on the links, these things are big. The cross chains are grade 70.

    I noticed you're from NH, I bought the chains at B&B Chain
    a division of Chappel Tractor in Milford so I think I'll try it and see. They have more knowhow than me, hopefully.

  5. #5
    Elite Member
    Rest in Peace

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    3,741
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Tractor
    Kubota B2710, IH TD6-62 dozer with Drott 4n1 bucket loader

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    Chains should be tight. With R4's they tend to be a little loose and some parts of the chain will slip between the treads. With turf tires, I definitely would make them as tight as possible. As you can see in the picture, they do tend to move a little with R4's. What you don't want is for the chains to be flopping around. They will stretch a bit after the first year too.

    Yes, the BB Chain guys know their business.
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    My friends call me Mad, everyone else thinks I'm mad.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,553

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    For R4's you actually want the cross chain to have some flop to it. Not much, but some. They won't shed mud otherwise.

  7. #7
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    881
    Location
    Harpers Ferry WV
    Tractor
    Kubota L4330, 6 rear remotes

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    Tight is right. Don't understand the advice about the front. If you need chains for traction--say, on ice--then if the tire turns (that is, "yaws") and the chain doesn't, how would the tractor turn? I have turf, run chains, and the tighter they are, the better they perform: better body clearance, traction, turning, chain life, and tire life.

    Check out installation info on any chain web site (e.g., tirechains.com). Instruction always are, put 'em on tight, drive a short distance and retighten. If you check Bailey's forestry site, along with log skidder chains (the real big boys) they sell two types of chain tightening tools, one a jack-like tool, the other a screw type. ...tirechains.com sells them too, along with small chain binders to help you get those big ole chain tighteners on tight.

  8. #8
    Super Star Member Thomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    12,197
    Location
    Lebanon,NH.
    Tractor
    Kubota L2800HST w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Casco1
    but he didn't say loose he said just loose enough to be able to squeeze your hand under the cross chain..
    I was thinking in the lines of off the lawn and driveway,when one ventures into rough area w/roots & limbs & branches etc.,for loose tire chain about width hand good way snag fallen branch etc. and the next you know it could be trying to slap you or dent the fenders.

    Another way for tight fit....let little air out of the tire,install tire chain,blow tire back to setting psi.

  9. #9
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    881
    Location
    Harpers Ferry WV
    Tractor
    Kubota L4330, 6 rear remotes

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    Airing down to put chains on and then airing up to make them tight is the one thing universally discouraged.

  10. #10
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    106
    Location
    Erie,Pa.
    Tractor
    Kubota L2350DT

    Default Re: Tire chain damage

    Educate me, why is airing up/down discouraged?

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