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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    87
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Tractor
    Yanmar 155D

    Default Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    OK, I'm really agonizing over what sort of trailer I should get to haul my Yanmar 155D. It's a very small tractor weighing 1145 lbs. With the loader and fluids, I'm probably more like 1500 lbs. If I take an implement, add on another 300 lbs totaling 1800. Just to be conservative, let's say the most I'll haul is 2000 lbs. Total length is about 15 feet and nothing is over 4' wide.

    My towing vehicle is a 2003 4.0L Ford Ranger 4X4 FX4 package automatic. It came wired with a flat 4 connector. In researching past threads, I've read a lot of comments about how one should take towing seriously and get a full size truck with low gear ratios. Right now, this is what I have; can afford and can fit in the garage. The published towing capacity is about 5500 lbs, however, the GCWR is 9500. To be perfectly legal, 9500-5400 (truck and driver) = 4500 lbs.

    Since usage plays a roll in all this, I'll add that I anticipate transporting the tractor 5-25 miles away and back about six times a year. There a few hills, but it's fairly flat and no expressways. I'm sure I'll find other uses for the trailer such as moving firewood, brush, helping friends move, hayrides, transporting lumber etc.

    From where I stand, my options are:
    1. Rent a 6x12 uhaul (limited attachment space)
    2. Buy a 5x14 singe axle trailer, no brakes...2990 max load (doable, right? brakes a concern?)
    3. Buy a light duty 6x16 tandem axle with brakes, brake controller, and weight distribution hitch. (Is this overkill?)
    4. Buy a 6x16 tandem aluminum trailer with brakes saving about 300-500 lbs, and no worries about rust since it will be stored outdoors.

    Any insights from other small tractor owners or Ranger drivers would be appreciated!
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Gold Member hosejockey2002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    403
    Location
    Auburn, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20 HST

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    I used to have a Yanmar 1401D, similar in size and weight to your 155D. IMO, you need a 16' tandem axle with brakes, minimum. With loader and an implement, say a box scraper, you'll be at 2000 lbs. plus, which will be too much for most single axle trailers, as well as the machine being too long for anything under around 14 feet. If you are hauling any distance at all, the weight distribution hitch will not be a bad idea either. It's really easy to outgrow a trailer. My 16 footer is just barely enough trailer for the Kioti CK20 I now have. I'm seriously considering a 10K GVWR 18' or 20 footer.
    Kioti CK20 HST, KB 120 Loader
    Woods BH70X Backhoe with thumb
    Landpride 54" Box Scraper
    Howse 60" rake
    Howse 42" rotary cutter (I know, it's too small)
    2005 Chevy 2500HD with Maxi-dump insert
    16' Bulldog equipment trailer

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    638

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    I agree with HOSEJOCKEY 2002. The down-side with a single axle trailer is the "squirming" of the trailer tires. They are always surging slightly side to side, which causes heat build-up at max trailer weight, and eventually blow outs on a 25 mile drive! I have been there!

    If you are going to spend the money for a trailer; get a tandem axle for peace of mind and safety, with surge or electric brakes on at least one axle. I think you will still be within the limits of your towing truck? Your tractor will get a much smoother ride also.

  4. #4
    Gold Member BruceR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    401
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    YM 2000B, JD 110, cub cadet 109, cub cadet 70, cub cadet 100

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    I'm interested in seeing the reccomendations as well. I have a Ranger and a YM2000B. I don't intend to haul the tractor unless it needs repair that I can't do myself. I have been thinking along the lines of a 5'x14' dovetail with tandem axle and single brake.

    Bruce

  5. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    573
    Location
    Rockland Cty, NY(sou. NY)
    Tractor
    Kubota BX24

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    I agree with the crowd, that a dual axle with brakes is the best way to tow. Your problem will be finding a dual axle trailer with a GVW stamp that fits your trucks maximum capacity of 5500lbs. Most I have seen are 7000lbs and some are listed at 6000lbs. If the stamp or sticker on the trailer is higher than what your truck is rated for, you could get ticketed, no matter what the trailer is registered as. On the other hand, you can find a good quality single axle with trailer with a heavy axle rated for 5000lbs and your in compliance.
    See if you can find a manufacturer that woul stamp your trailer as 5000-5500lbs.

    Good luck.
    BX24, 60"MMM, Farmforce 4 ft box blade, Farmforce 5 ft landscape rake, Mighty Bandit 6" chipper w/20hp Onan

  6. #6
    Silver Member drtydeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    149
    Location
    Nazareth, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota BX23

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    I'd recommend a light double axle trailer (with electric brakes). Make sure that it is plenty long (in the 14-16' range). These will allow enough room for implements and enable you to "adjust" the load without the see-saw effect of single axle trailers. I have a little BX and a Holmes 7x16 7K trailer...wish I'd gone bigger on the trailer now.

    Remember, that you're pulling the trailer weight plus the machine (combined will be approx 2 ton). That much weight will push the back end of your light truck around very quickly. Brakes are certainly warranted. Surge brakes are usually more expensive (than electric brakes) and are illegal in some states.

    Good Luck.
    Dirty Deeds
    Bx23, 60"MMM, Woods Toothbar, 60" RB, weights
    00 GMC 3500HD 6.5TD Dump Crew Cab "one ugly orange truck"

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    6,138
    Location
    East PA or 750 mi. east of a short man named Dar___
    Tractor
    Kubota, AGCO, New Holland LB

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    Quote Originally Posted by swedish-fish
    OK, I'm really agonizing over what sort of trailer I should get to haul my Yanmar 155D. It's a very small tractor weighing 1145 lbs. With the loader and fluids, I'm probably more like 1500 lbs. If I take an implement, add on another 300 lbs totaling 1800. Just to be conservative, let's say the most I'll haul is 2000 lbs. Total length is about 15 feet and nothing is over 4' wide.

    My towing vehicle is a 2003 4.0L Ford Ranger 4X4 FX4 package automatic. It came wired with a flat 4 connector. In researching past threads, I've read a lot of comments about how one should take towing seriously and get a full size truck with low gear ratios. Right now, this is what I have; can afford and can fit in the garage. The published towing capacity is about 5500 lbs, however, the GCWR is 9500. To be perfectly legal, 9500-5400 (truck and driver) = 4500 lbs.

    Since usage plays a roll in all this, I'll add that I anticipate transporting the tractor 5-25 miles away and back about six times a year. There a few hills, but it's fairly flat and no expressways. I'm sure I'll find other uses for the trailer such as moving firewood, brush, helping friends move, hayrides, transporting lumber etc.

    From where I stand, my options are:
    1. Rent a 6x12 uhaul (limited attachment space)
    2. Buy a 5x14 singe axle trailer, no brakes...2990 max load (doable, right? brakes a concern?)
    3. Buy a light duty 6x16 tandem axle with brakes, brake controller, and weight distribution hitch. (Is this overkill?)
    4. Buy a 6x16 tandem aluminum trailer with brakes saving about 300-500 lbs, and no worries about rust since it will be stored outdoors.

    Any insights from other small tractor owners or Ranger drivers would be appreciated!
    Thanks.
    In your financial situation can you afford an aluminum trailer? The old aluminum over steel saying is "half the weight, twice the price".

    6 rentals of a trailer per year will cost how much? Let's say it's $75 a pop. That's $450/yr. A basic 2 axle light trailer would cost say $2,500. If that's the case, then it would take 5-6 years to pay it off. Plus a rental saves you storage space. I'm assuming you'll also need a trailer hitch installed.

    I think option #3 might be your best bet. Or maybe you could find a used aluminum trailer?

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,443
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    From where I stand, my options are:
    1. Rent a 6x12 uhaul (limited attachment space)
    2. Buy a 5x14 singe axle trailer, no brakes...2990 max load (doable, right? brakes a concern?)
    3. Buy a light duty 6x16 tandem axle with brakes, brake controller, and weight distribution hitch. (Is this overkill?)
    4. Buy a 6x16 tandem aluminum trailer with brakes saving about 300-500 lbs, and no worries about rust since it will be stored outdoors.
    I've been towing trailers of all types for over 50 years, and sometimes doing things that others here would certainly not recommend. But even I would not want to haul your tractor on a 6' x 12' U-haul single axle trailer. And U-haul and other companies just might not rent you a trailer if they knew that's how you intended to use it. A few years ago, my two brothers were going to move a portable storage building about 35 miles on farm-to-market roads and they rented a tandem axle U-haul to do the job. One brother went by the place in his S-10 to pick up the trailer, but told them when loaded it would be pulled by the other brother with a Suburban. They refused to let him have the trailer. He had to go after the trailer in the Suburban (an extra 100 mile round trip).

    I agree with the other guys that a tandem axle trailer with brakes is by far the best way to go. And I assume you have a frame mounted hitch, not a bumper mount ball, on that Ranger. I have a 2001 Ranger supercab, 2WD, with the 4.0L engine and automatic. It, too, has the 4 wire flat trailer plug and only had a bumper mount ball, but I had U-haul install a frame mounted hitch receiver on it.
    Bird

  9. #9
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    87
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Tractor
    Yanmar 155D

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    Thanks all!
    Well it's pretty clear based on the responses that a tandem axle with brakes is the way to go. So if I were to summarize, it's better to address safety and have plenty of headroom in terms of load carrying capacity, length, dual wheels (for squirming, anti sway, added braking..) for the load to be carried rather than be concerned about sizing something more in line to what my Ranger would pull. Right?

    Since I don't see them very often, does anyone successfully pull a 6x16 trailer with a small pickup?

  10. #10
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    87
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Tractor
    Yanmar 155D

    Default Re: Single axle or tandem, brakes or no brakes?

    Quote Originally Posted by asylum575
    Your problem will be finding a dual axle trailer with a GVW stamp that fits your trucks maximum capacity of 5500lbs. Most I have seen are 7000lbs and some are listed at 6000lbs. If the stamp or sticker on the trailer is higher than what your truck is rated for, you could get ticketed, no matter what the trailer is registered as.
    Good luck.
    Really? I could get ticketed based on the potential of breaking the law?
    I didn't know I had a problem with pulling a 7000 lb GVWR rated trailer if I only put 2500 lbs on it (guessing the trailer would weigh about 1600 lbs)

    This scenario would put me at my limit of 4100 lbs. Sorry, the first post should have said 9500 (GCWR) - 5400 (truck and driver) = 4100 lbs.

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