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  1. #1
    Gold Member
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    Dec 2004
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    Andice, Texas

    Default Dry Rotting Tires

    I once counted all the tires I have. Between the cars, truck, trailers, ATVs and farm implements, I have over 100 tires. Ugh!

    Most of my tires dry rot after a few years and by 10 years, they are pretty much shot. Not worn out, but dry rotted. I have a few really old tires on farm implements that seem to last forever. Someone told me the old nylon tires won't dry rot nearly as fast as the new ones.

    I can't ever seem to wear out tires unless they are on my car or truck. The other ones just fall apart before they are worn out. For my farm implement and light duty trailer tires, my criteria is ones that won't dry rot very fast.

    Any suggestions or are today's tires just not made to last past a few years?
    John Deere 5420/4WD/FEL, PwrReverser
    8MX Shredder, Belltec TM-48-HTL PHD, WR Long RBG Grapple, 12" Tree Terminator & more...

  2. #2
    Super Member
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    Feb 2006
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    6,138
    Location
    East PA or 750 mi. east of a short man named Dar___
    Tractor
    Kubota, AGCO, New Holland LB

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryBDavis View Post
    I once counted all the tires I have. Between the cars, truck, trailers, ATVs and farm implements, I have over 100 tires. Ugh!

    Most of my tires dry rot after a few years and by 10 years, they are pretty much shot. Not worn out, but dry rotted. I have a few really old tires on farm implements that seem to last forever. Someone told me the old nylon tires won't dry rot nearly as fast as the new ones.

    I can't ever seem to wear out tires unless they are on my car or truck. The other ones just fall apart before they are worn out. For my farm implement and light duty trailer tires, my criteria is ones that won't dry rot very fast.

    Any suggestions or are today's tires just not made to last past a few years?
    Parking my stuff in garages or barns or out of direct sun seems to help my tires from checking & dry rotting more than anything.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    5,094
    Location
    North of Mtl,Que,Can (Ste Adele)
    Tractor
    MT180D

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    I agree, the UV is what does it.

    However is there any product that can 'rejuvenate' or fill in those weather checks?

    Being that modern tires are generally nylon or other synthetic cords it would seem that a product might exist to fill or re-seal the weather checks.

    The old tires were cotton cords which, naturally would rot with time. Nylon will resist rot so it stands to reason that a tire's life might be extended if 'checks' could be filled.

    I know the basic answer--like on motor homes and RV's, one should drape a tarp or other cover over the tire to block the UV, but who remembers to do that after a day in the saddle.

  4. #4
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    410
    Location
    Andice, Texas

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    As far as dry rot goes, tractor tires last a lot longer out in the weather than auto tires. They must be made from something different.
    John Deere 5420/4WD/FEL, PwrReverser
    8MX Shredder, Belltec TM-48-HTL PHD, WR Long RBG Grapple, 12" Tree Terminator & more...

  5. #5
    Super Member
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    Feb 2006
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    6,138
    Location
    East PA or 750 mi. east of a short man named Dar___
    Tractor
    Kubota, AGCO, New Holland LB

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    don't know if it's true, but I've heard armor-all helps.

  6. #6
    Epic Contributor
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    jinman's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    21,014
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryBDavis View Post
    As far as dry rot goes, tractor tires last a lot longer out in the weather than auto tires. They must be made from something different.
    Gary, I think tractor tires would likely shed rubber and come apart if we ran them down the road at 70+ mph. However, the rubber seems to be much thicker than the average load range D or E tire. I have a trailer with 10 yr old tires that were new in 1998. My neighbor borrowed the trailer to haul his lightweight tractor to his deer lease. Halfway there, one tire shed it's tread and when he came back, another tire's sidewall let go. He didn't haul the tractor but about 5 miles before the tires let go. I think I'd have to cover them with a skirt to keep UV from ruining the tires.
    Jim


  7. #7
    Elite Member CurlyDave's Avatar
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    Dec 2005
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    4,396
    Location
    Grants Pass, OR
    Tractor
    JD TLB 110

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    How fast a tire rots depends on how much antioxidant was compounded into the rubber.

    One of the best things you can do for a tire is to use it every few weeks. The antioxidant tends to become depleted at the surface, and getting the tire warm and flexing redistributes the remaining antioxidant inside the rubber, replenishing that on the surface.

    UV shielding is good, but ozone also eats tires and you can't shield that.

    There is nothing that will "fill the cracks" and regenerate old tires. The best thing is prevention.

    jinman's experience should be a lesson to all of us. It sounds like the only bad result was the loss of two tires, but I hate to think of the potential consequences if I were to lose a tire on a heavy trailer at high speed.
    40 Acres on a hill - fantastic view. JD 110 TLB, 4-n-1, 12" bucket, 18" bucket, Addington thumb, rock bucket (doubles as root grapple)

    Not only do we not understand the universe, if someone explained it to us, we would not know what he was talking about.

    Isaac Asimov

  8. #8
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    May 2003
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    17,387
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Tractor
    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    I was told one of the characteristics of trailer tires over automobile tires is that they are designed for sitting in the sun for extended periods of time without drying out and cracking. I can't say for sure if this is true or not, but the trailer tires that I bought for my trailers are still looking very good after four to five years of having them.

    RV's have covers that they put over their tires to protect them from the sun. Basically, just a material of some kind that drapes over the tires. I don't know how effective they are, or if they are even needed since most RV Tires are similar to big rig tires and super expensive. I've never seen the ones my parents have develop rot or cracks and they never cover their tires.

    Are the tires with the problems on trailers, tractors or vehicles?

    Eddie

  9. #9
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    410
    Location
    Andice, Texas

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    The problem is with the trailer and implement tires. The cars and trucks wear the out before they can dry rot.
    John Deere 5420/4WD/FEL, PwrReverser
    8MX Shredder, Belltec TM-48-HTL PHD, WR Long RBG Grapple, 12" Tree Terminator & more...

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    6,138
    Location
    East PA or 750 mi. east of a short man named Dar___
    Tractor
    Kubota, AGCO, New Holland LB

    Default Re: Dry Rotting Tires

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieWalker View Post
    Are the tires with the problems on trailers, tractors or vehicles?

    Eddie
    At my big tire dealer, he has piles of dry rotted big truck tires with tons of tread left on them in the back of his shop.

    There's a set of 6 matching Goodyear 12R 22.5's in his back lot with full tread on them. I asked him if he could sell me one as a spare. He said they wouldn't last much longer because they were starting to rot. I was shocked to see that they were in fact starting to rot a little, but the tread was at least 95%.

    He told me they were on a fire engine that saw almost no use. The tires were replaced with a new set. Another example of your tax dollars hard at work.

    I have a spare dumptruck tire with 1" of tread left that has started weather checking because (luckily) I've never had to use it.

    I have noticed that certain tire dealers up my way have warehouses with unusual lighting in them. I wonder if they have certain lights that don't cause the rubber to break down.

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