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  1. #1
    Gold Member dieselfuelonly's Avatar
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    Aug 2007
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    Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    Tractor
    Yanmar YM1401D

    Default What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    Would this work for securing my Bobcat to my trailer? The Bobcat weighs about 5000lbs.

    So, I'd get two of these, one for the front and one for the rear:

    Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

    And then two of these ratchet binders:

    Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

    Would that work well, or should I be getting different chains/straps/binders/etc?
    Hi my name is Dennis.
    Yanmar YM1401D, 12k 16+2ft trailer, 1996 Dodge 3500 2WD Cummins 5spd, 1973 M35A2 "Deuce and a Half"




  2. #2
    Super Member
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    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    Dennis, DOT wants to see a chain and binder on all four corners.

    MarkV

  3. #3
    Veteran Member
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    Jan 2008
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    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    It's not only the weight but you're going to have to figure travel and stopping speeds.
    A 5000 lb tractor will weigh a lot more traveling at ( X) MPH and stopping.

    Called FRONT PROJECTION limits.

    Figuring too close to weight of the tractor is not going to work in an emergency.

    While not strictly part of the trailer but worth noting is the transport chains and binders used to secure heavy equipment loads. Chain is not that large an investment; if your chain is the least suspect, better safe than sorry. Chain comes in various grades and thickness; the most commonly used chain in securing loads is Grade 70, 3/8 in., which has a 6,600-lb. maximum pull. For heavier loads, there is a Grade 70, 1/2 in. with 11,300 maximum pull.

    Binders, chains, hooks and clevis pins all should be permanently marked with their capacity. If you find you need to upgrade your binders, ratchet binders have twice the strength of mechanical lever binders, and they are also much easier to tighten than the lever ones.

    Whether its chains, ropes, wraps or webbing, whatever secures the load must comply with the Federal Motor Carrier Regulations regarding the Aggregate Working Load Limit. The basic requirement is that tiedowns must have the combined strength equal to at least 50 percent of the load being secured.

    The way to calculate the aggregate load limit is to add 50 percent of the working load limit of each tiedown used to secure the load; and if the total is greater than 50 percent of the load being carried, it is secured within the limit requirements. For example, assume that a trailer is being loaded with an 11,000-lb. telehandler, which will be held with four Grade 70, 3/8-in. chains. Since each chain is rated at 6,600 maximum pull, the aggregate working load limit is 6,600 lbs. divided by two. The total of the four chains added together is 13,200 lbs. That's more than enough to hold the 11,000-lb. telehandler.
    Loading methods

    Centering a load in the middle of the trailer is a basic tenet in proper loading, but it sometimes is overlooked when adding attachments or loading a large piece of equipment with limited view of the deck. Using a deck board as a guide to keep the load centered is an effective method of keeping the load centered. Overall, the weight of the load should be slightly forward so that 10 to 15 percent is on the front tongue. Fifth wheel trailers can handle as much as 25 percent of the load on the front.

    http:
    //auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/towing/towing-capacity/information/overweight-load.htm


    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-p...r-capacity.htm

  4. #4
    Super Star Member Diamondpilot's Avatar
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    Daleville, IN
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    Jinma 254/284 Ford 861 Powermaster at work

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    Good advise given here. What I did was get 2 14' Grade 70 3/8" chain and 4 Lever Binders. I cut the chains into 2 each leaving me with 4 7' long pieces.

    The ratchet style just take too long for me but nothing wrong with them. Grade 70 is transport category chain and will not get a second look from DOT. It is gold in color so very easy to identify and will not rust like the other types of chain.

    Now to be totally honest I also have 4 27' 2" Ratchet Straps and 4 6' 2" wide Ratchet Straps that I use 90% of the time. I also got 4 21" axle straps. Much easier and its simply what I prefer but some say its not legal.

    Here are some pictures of my straps.

    Chris
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -6-strap-gif   -20-strap-gif   -axle-gif  
    Last edited by Diamondpilot; 02-28-2009 at 06:53 PM.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member JohnDeere4300's Avatar
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    John Deere 4300

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    You would probably need to check your state laws and see how many chains you need.

    In my state i use two chains, one for the front and one for the back.

    I take them and hook one end in the stake pocket, run through a place on the tractor and hook the other end to the other side stake pocket. Then use ratchet binders and tighten the chain up.

    My tractor weighs 6100lbs. with the FEL, backhoe and a full tank of fuel.

    You want to use ratchet binders, if you use the other type you will need to carry a cheater pipe to get the chain tight.
    John 3:16

    01 JohnDeere4300 "Sync-Reverser", Vertical Exhaust, 2 JD Lawn Tractors, JD Walk Behind.

    430-FEL/ 47-Backhoe/ 5' Bush-Hog/ Single Bottom Plow/ 6' Disc/ Aerator Spreader/ HF Quick-Hitch!

    (Homemade Stuff) BH Thumb/ Log-Hitch/ 10' Boom-Pole/ 42'' Pallet Forks ''FEL Quick Attach & 3PH Quick-Hitch-Attach''/ Ballast Box 1381 lbs./ Aluminum Canopy/ Brush-Guard Mod/ 5x10 Firewood Trailer/ Lawn Striper.

  6. #6
    Super Member George2615's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
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    Central Square, NY
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    LS XR3037HC

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    To be safe hauling your 5K load you should use 4 grade 70 3/8" chains and binders. Two in front, two in back.
    Legally for loads under 10K you only are required to use one in front and one in back. When securing a load like this on a trailer I believe more is better and safer.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member JoelD's Avatar
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    Windham, NH
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    Kioti LK3054xs TLB, 2004

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    I use the 10000 lb ratcheting straps, I use 5, four corners and one on the center front. They are strong straps. Ultimately I'd like to go with chains and binders, but for my 5000 lb tractor I feel I'm good.

    The straps were about 15 bucks a piece, much less than the chain and binder set up would be, someday I'll break down and get chains and binders.

    Joel
    Joel
    2004 Kioti LK3054XS TLB
    Woods Box Blade
    King Cutter Tiller
    Three Point Snow Blower
    York rake
    60 inch king kutter tiller
    1994 Ford F600 Dump Truck "Kioti Hauler"

  8. #8
    Elite Member
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    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    Quote Originally Posted by George2615 View Post
    I believe more is better and safer.
    At what point would you call it 'over kill' ?
    ::Sent from a standard desktop keyboard::

    My Photobucket

  9. #9
    Silver Member Midsouth's Avatar
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    Okolona,MS
    Tractor
    Mahindra 3525

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    All good advice here. New dot securement rules say that any wheeled or tracked equipment must be tied down at all 4 corners and any movable parts must be secured also. Such things as backhoe arms and crane booms are good examples of these. I spent about 10 years pulling flatbed and lowboy trailers with loads up to 16' wide and up to 120,000 lbs gross weights there is no such thing as too much securement imho.

  10. #10
    Elite Member Skyco's Avatar
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    SC/NC

    Default Re: What am I going to need to secure my Bobcat to my trailer?

    Several mentions of DOT rules- question- are these state or federal rules? I've read the federal rules and there are requirements based on weight and length. The thing I noticed is they seem to address only commercial loads in interstate use. Now I tie my equipment down well, better than many I see on the road, but is a non-commercial user allowed to skate on these requirements? Seems so.

    http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regul.../cs-policy.htm

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