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  1. #1
    Veteran Member
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    Jun 2002
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    Oklahoma City
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    Deere 855 (24hp/19@PTO)

    Default Rotten Trailer Boards

    My open bed trailer has to sit outside year 'round and has developed rot and spongy spots in several boards. The trailer is in otherwise good shape. I use it to haul my tractor around, but it probably is not safe to do so until I replace the boards.

    Any ideas on what to use that will have a long life??

    I see boards used in repair work on "This Old House", for example, that are some sort of plastic composite. They seem sturdy, but would they hold up to the weight of a tractor?

    Are pressure treated 2x8s a good way to go?

    The trailer is 16' long.

    Any ideas would be much appreciated. Thanks.

    OkieG

  2. #2
    Veteran Member DUMBDOG's Avatar
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    Jul 2002
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    Central ND, Central FL
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    NH 1630 W-7308 FEL/ Kubota L4630GSTC W-LA853 FEL WQ/A-CC 2544

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    My brother purchased a small trailer many years ago, one of those small ones that you put together. Now the metal is bent up but the pressure treated wood is still good.

  3. #3
    Elite Member Gary_in_Indiana's Avatar
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    Apr 2002
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    Fort Wayne, IN
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    John Deere 4200 MFWD HST w/ JD 420 FEL w/ 61" loader bucket & toothbar & JD 37 BH w/ 12" bucket

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    Enclosed semi trailers use a material known as "apitong" (sp?) flooring. I'm guessing that might be a trade name for Appalachian Oak. If you're worried about hauling heavy, that might be something to consider.

    You might want to look into buying some steel diamond tread plate material and welding it on your frame. I don't think it's terribly expensive. Use that and, Viola', you have a steel trailer. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] I hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Super Member
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    frank_f15's Avatar
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    Mar 2001
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    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
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    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    i would just use good pressure treated wood. should take quite a while for that to rot out. Garys idea about the steel diamond plate is good, don't know how much extra weight that will add to the total package or if it matters.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
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    Nov 2000
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    1,720
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    Columbia county NY
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    87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    <font color=red>I see boards used in repair work on "This Old House", for example, that are some sort of plastic somposite. They seem sturdy, but would they hold up to the weight of a tractor?</font color=red>

    Nope will not work. These boards have a lot of flex in them. They will bend under the tractor.

  6. #6
    Super Star Member Thomas's Avatar
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    Lebanon,NH.
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    Kubota L2800HST w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    Pressure treated boards seems the best way to go..not unless there a locate mill around you that offers Elm boards,for Elm board 2" thick one tough board once become dry..and than oil the boards down in good shape.

    Gary's idea is indeed a good one,but be careful if the deck should become wet or snow upon..could become slippy,and if your trailer bed tilted plus your tires muddy etc..traction could hamper your loading..I guess you could always add cleats to the metal bedding for tractions.

  7. #7
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    I'd have a tendency to first go for the steel diamond plate or else 2x6 treated boards.
    With the steel deck you could weld all kinds of retainers to keep equipment from moving.
    It all depends on economics and your abilities/equipment if you do it yourself.

    Egon

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Location
    N Central Ohio
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    NH TC35D/SUPER H&M/F-20/JD B&D/FORDSON/JD250 SSL

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    Rough sawn white oak makes a fine floor.
    Barrels are made out of this for brewing some
    of the fine adult drinks.
    Natural water resistant.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    953
    Location
    Texas
    Tractor
    Mahindra 4110

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    Why not just convert to a steel floor and forget having to replace the floor every some-odd number of years?

    Steel sheeting is cheaper than you might think (especially since it is a "one time deal") and offers other benefits as well (e.g. weld in tie down pockets wherever you want/however many you want, doesn't gouge/splinter, etc.)

  10. #10
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
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    Road 4310
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    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: Rotten Trailer Boards

    My friend had the exact same problem. He sold the trailer and bought a new one for far less differance than repairing the rotten boards - go figure...

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