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  1. #11
    Veteran Member deerefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,474
    Location
    louisiana
    Tractor
    1952 8N, 2005 JD 5103

    Default Re: Paint question

    Quote Originally Posted by BIG DOOLEY View Post
    Thanks for the compliment.
    Growing up i worked in a neighbors bodyshop and learned alot.
    That is exactly how I learned mechanic work. Started sweeping floors in the shop and a couple years later was working as a level 1 mechanic. Kept my mouth shut and ears open- amazing now looking back the stuff I learned.

  2. #12
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    46,372
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Paint question

    Quote Originally Posted by deerefan View Post
    This is how I approach this truck. I ride pastures in it and have branches rub the sides on occassion. The truck is mechanicaly sound and worth putting a few hundred in to a paint job. I have a garge/shop to spray in but no booth. I like ray66's advice and am looking into these products now with NAPA.


    some plastic sheeting and some pvc pipe or 2x4 makes a great temp spray booth..

  3. #13
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    335
    Location
    Great North of Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500, Oliver Super55

    Default Re: Paint question

    To do the hood and roof of your truck yourself it is definitely doable. First thing to do is go to a store that specializes with automotive paints. They can find and blend the model color for your year vehicle and some have computers where they can take a paint chip and match the color. Doing a rattle can job over large panels like that are very difficult to get good results without streaking. Get the original finish scuffed up real good and lay your primer down than start the wet sanding. Priming is where paying attention to detail pays off. While the pros can often blend and lay multiple coats to fix an imperfection with the paint I never have had any luck with it. I always got either runs or orange peel from laying too many wet coats too fast.

    I would recommend going with a single stage acrylic enamel with a wet look hardener over using a basecoat clearcloat. Unless your truck has an immaculate finish it won't likely be noticeable plus it is much easier to work with and doesn't require wheeling and buffing to get a factory finish. My experience with clear coat is you really need to know what your doing with it to get desired results; Lay too thick get runs, too thin it leaves overspray resulting in a ton of buffing and if the paint has any oil on it you'll get fisheyes.

    My advice would be 1. Watch youtube vids on auto painting 2. Go to a pro-shop to get paint/primer such as Napa. The guys should know what paints and how much you'll need, if they don't go to another store. 3. Use right tools. A good air compressor with a cheap inline moisture filter and a unclogged spray gun are critical. Practice on some scrap sheet metal before you start to make sure you have the gun calibrated correctly and keep an eye on the hose so as not to drag on your prepped/painted areas.

    If the results turn out good you'll be looking for other things to paint trust me

  4. #14
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,480
    Location
    N.E., Ohio
    Tractor
    GC2310, Toro Reelmaster 5100D

    Default Re: Paint question

    Quote Originally Posted by super55 View Post
    To do the hood and roof of your truck yourself it is definitely doable. First thing to do is go to a store that specializes with automotive paints. They can find and blend the model color for your year vehicle and some have computers where they can take a paint chip and match the color. Doing a rattle can job over large panels like that are very difficult to get good results without streaking. Get the original finish scuffed up real good and lay your primer down than start the wet sanding. Priming is where paying attention to detail pays off. While the pros can often blend and lay multiple coats to fix an imperfection with the paint I never have had any luck with it. I always got either runs or orange peel from laying too many wet coats too fast.

    I would recommend going with a single stage acrylic enamel with a wet look hardener over using a basecoat clearcloat. Unless your truck has an immaculate finish it won't likely be noticeable plus it is much easier to work with and doesn't require wheeling and buffing to get a factory finish. My experience with clear coat is you really need to know what your doing with it to get desired results; Lay too thick get runs, too thin it leaves overspray resulting in a ton of buffing and if the paint has any oil on it you'll get fisheyes.

    My advice would be 1. Watch youtube vids on auto painting 2. Go to a pro-shop to get paint/primer such as Napa. The guys should know what paints and how much you'll need, if they don't go to another store. 3. Use right tools. A good air compressor with a cheap inline moisture filter and a unclogged spray gun are critical. Practice on some scrap sheet metal before you start to make sure you have the gun calibrated correctly and keep an eye on the hose so as not to drag on your prepped/painted areas.

    If the results turn out good you'll be looking for other things to paint trust me
    Keep in mind that you only have to prime the areas that you have repaired. Anywhere the existing finish is sound, and free of defects, it only needs to be cleaned and scuff sanded.

  5. #15
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    46,372
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Paint question

    Quote Originally Posted by super55 View Post
    . First thing to do is go to a store that specializes with automotive paints. They can find and blend the model color for your year vehicle and some have computers where they can take a paint chip and match the color. Doing a rattle can job over large panels like that are very difficult to get good results without streaking. I would recommend going with a single stage acrylic enamel with a wet look hardener over using a basecoat clearcloat. Unless your truck has an immaculate finish it won't likely be noticeable plus it is much easier to work with and doesn't require wheeling and buffing to get a factory finish. :
    I agree.. i did this on all 3 trucks I painted. I had carquest match my factory paint via door code, then mix it up in nason synthetic enamil, single stage.

    worked awesome.

  6. #16
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    181
    Location
    Houston Tx
    Tractor
    1900 Ford

    Default Re: Paint question

    Camo paint job with extra cans of spray paint you have laying around always looks sharp.

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