Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    340
    Location
    Fairfax, Franklin County, Vermont
    Tractor
    1999 Cub Cadet 7260

    Default Trailer Tires

    I'm just getting ready to start my spring project, building an 18' tandem axle trailer to haul my tractor (and other stuff). I have a question concerning the tires for my trailer. I will have 16" tires on the trailer, and am wondering if it would be O.K. to use regular load range E tires like what are on my pickup, or should I install trailer service tires? Do the trailer service tires really make a difference? I have access to some truck tires for a good price, but I don't want to try and save a few $$ only to end up with a trailer that doesn't track well. Thanks in advance for any info.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Corm


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    3
    Location
    S/E Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Kubota 2410HSDB

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    The difference is that the trailer tires have a higher load rating for ther size. As long as the load rating for all the tires addded together is greater than the load on the trailer you should be Ok. truck tire or trailer tire about the same as long as the weight rating is sufficient.


  3. #3
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,225
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    Corm, there may be some load rating differences like Ed mentioned, but that's noted on the sidewall so it's easy to check and see if the tires you are considering are strong enough for the load (and load range E is). However, the real difference in the trailer tires is supposed to be a slight chemical difference in their resistance to ultraviolet rays from the sun. As you may know, a lot of trailer tires are used very little and develop sidewall cracks long before they wear out. Trailer tires also are usually not rated for as high a speed as car and pickup tires. In other words, don't use trailer special tires on your pickup, but there's not a thing wrong with using the pickup tires on your trailer as long as you know they may show weather cracks sooner than a trailer special tire would.

    P.S. Corm, I'm assuming you have wheels (rims) that are rated for the higher air pressures of load range E tires. I've known of folks with wheels rated for load range C tires putting E tires on to handle a heavier load and have a rim split.

    Bird<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by Bird on 03/31/01 07:18 PM (server time).</FONT></P>

  4. #4
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    340
    Location
    Fairfax, Franklin County, Vermont
    Tractor
    1999 Cub Cadet 7260

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    Ed2410 and Bird - Thanks for the info. The tires I'm considering are load range E tires so I believe I'm all set there. The wheels I have are 16" wheels off of a Ford pickup, so they will support the load and tire pressures with no problem. I ordered my trailer axles with Ford hubs so I could use the spare tire from my truck for either the trailer or the truck to make things a little easier (and a little less expensive). Bird, your comment about the chemical makeup of trailer tires is interesting. My Dad has a 15 year old camper with the original tires on it, and they still look pretty good. Now I know why. Thanks!!

    Corm from the Snowy Northeast Kingdom of Vermont!


  5. #5
    Veteran Member gordon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,786
    Location
    Delaware
    Tractor
    L4310hst-loader-hydraulic top link

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    Bird, a true trailer tire has the ability to have the sidewall flex alot more than a standard tire as well. Thats why you can't use a trailer special tire on a truck or car. Danger-[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Gordon



  6. #6
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,225
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    Oops, I overlooked one of the differences. Of course you're right, Gordon.

    Bird

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    Corn,
    We did this all the time and they still do back home on the ranch. Reason being that trailer tires would never hold up to the rigors of the rocky dirt roads on the ranch and the extra weight we were always putting on them. I could always tell a trailer with or without truck tires, with a heavy load, as they actually tracked worse with trailer tires than truck tires.


  8. #8
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    340
    Location
    Fairfax, Franklin County, Vermont
    Tractor
    1999 Cub Cadet 7260

    Default Re: Trailer Tires

    Thanks Cowboydoc! That is just the kind of info I was looking for. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] I live on a dirt road and will be using this trailer close to the limits of it's capacity quite a bit. I have the frame all welded together, and will work on attaching the frame to the tongue frame this weekend. If my axles, springs, etc. come in tomorrow as promised, I should have all the pieces I need to complete my project.

    Corm


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2013 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.