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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default trailer floor

    The plywood floor on my trailer has rotted away and this weekend, I fell through. It has reached that time that I need to put a new floor onto the trailer. Any suggestions? It is a open trailer with a single axle, no brakes. I use it for moving light stuff, but it is heavy duty enough to hold the BX22 without grunting.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member
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    Aug 2001
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    11,496
    Location
    Upper Midwest USA
    Tractor
    JD 4300, JD X485 JD 4x2 Gator, JD 425, JD455

    Default Re: trailer floor

    My suggestion, if possible, get some rough sawn white oak boards for a tough floor that will withstand the weather. Or if plywood, then some treated marine-grade plywood.

    Somewhat dependent on the size of the trailer and the 'room' allowed to fit in the new flooring.

  3. #3
    Super Member Dargo's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    5,979
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    S. IN
    Tractor
    Jinma, Foton, TYM, Belarus, Yanmar, Branson, Montana, Mahindra and maybe some green and orange too.

    Default Re: trailer floor

    3/8" diamond plate aluminum ought to work fine. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  4. #4
    Veteran Member escavader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    2,054
    Location
    western maine
    Tractor
    bx-23 ,

    Default Re: trailer floor

    3/4 INCH ADVANTACH PLYWOOD.Dont let it fool you it looks like chipboard but it is tough stuff.Ihave had a 8 ft peice covering my recycle barreels for 6 years now.NOT A BIT of warp,and looks like the day i put it out there.yes its out side in the sun and rain and snowAWSOME STUFF WITH A 50 YEAR WARRANTEE!!!!
    ALAN

  5. #5
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    7,514
    Location
    Mt Washington, Kentucky
    Tractor
    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: trailer floor

    White oak. Best in the business! When you can let it sit for a couple months, soak it with a 75/25 mix of used motor oil/diesel fuel mopped on heavy. It will soak in and make that white oak last a lifetime. (That's how I build my hay wagon beds)

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: trailer floor

    Weight is a definite issue. I was also thinking of expanded metal, but not sure if it might not develop dips in the floor where it isn't supported. I don't want to spend a lot of time welding in more supports. The trailer doesn't get used for much more than picking up larger items that don't fit into the back of the SUV. I am afraid that once I start, I will want to rebuild this trailer with dual axles and brakes. We all know that can get expensive quickly and it would be less expensive to just buy another trailer. It can cost a small fortune to keep all the trailers registered and the old days of swapping plates from trailer to trailer are long gone. The fines are a definite deterrent to swapping.

  7. #7
    Platinum Member Defective's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    578
    Location
    Ontario, Canada

    Default Re: trailer floor

    If the trailer only gets occasional use, I'd just stick with plywood. Like someone mentioned above, use marine grade. I'd also paint it before installation and inspect it annually for paint damage. I've got a big toolbox made of angle iron and marine plywood that has been sitting in the back of a truck for the last 10 years or so and the only rot in the wood is where I dropped a chainsaw on it & didn't touch up the paint for a couple of years.

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    1,659
    Location
    Northeast MA
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200 with BH77 backhoe, Kubota B50 SSQA w/ 54" & 60" buckets, LandPride FDR1660

    Default Re: trailer floor

    I will second the Advantech. I used it for the subfloor when I added a second floor to my house a couple of years back and then I used it for the deck I put on the side of the house. It comes in 3/4", 1" and 1 1/8" thicknesses and really stands up to the weather much better than most plywoods and OSB type materials. The best deck might be a layer of 3/4" Advantech with some sort of rubber or a thin layer of diamond plate aluminum on top of that. The layer on top would protect the Advantech which would make it last pretty much forever.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: trailer floor

    The one thing that always worries me about diamond plate is the material can slide fairly easily on the surface. The more that I think about this, the more that the Advantech seems to be the answer. It only has to last another 10 years and then you will be coming down here to buy everything and tell everyone what a great deal you got from some old codger.. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Veteran Member jwstewar's Avatar
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    Sep 2001
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    2,289
    Location
    South Central Ohio
    Tractor
    2003 New Holland TC24D

    Default Re: trailer floor

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( It can cost a small fortune to keep all the trailers registered and the old days of swapping plates from trailer to trailer are long gone. The fines are a definite deterrent to swapping. )</font>

    But not if you get LBrown59's famous $5 license plates. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

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