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  1. #21
    Veteran Member RedRocker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,115
    Location
    Lewisville & Montague County, TX
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30 HST, dual remotes, FEL.

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Sorry, I was referring to the trailer, but thanks for the hitch links.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    93
    Location
    Lake Conroe area, Tx
    Tractor
    John Deere 3720

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Yup. This should give you an eye full.

    http://www.odomtrailer.com/odom_bumper_pull

  3. #23
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,772
    Location
    SE Michigan, AZ when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Thought you meant those two items. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]
    Since you responded to Highbeam. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
    Always interesting to look those places up. Learn something new every time. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]

  4. #24
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,450
    Location
    New York
    Tractor
    jd4100, Cub Cadet 3204 & Cub 125

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Not sure if Highbeam understands the vehicle you have is more than capable - not including the hitch and reciever ratings....based on your size tractor you should have a decent safety margin


    1/2-ton 2WD (lbs.) 7500 3.42
    1/2-ton 2WD (lbs.) 8500 4.10
    1/2-ton 4x4 (lbs.) 7200 3.42
    1/2-ton 4x4 (lbs.) 8200 4.10
    1/2-ton AWD (lbs.) 8000 3.73
    3/4-ton 2WD (lbs.) 7900 3.73 10,600 3.73
    3/4-ton 2WD (lbs.) 9900 4.10 12,000 4.10
    3/4-ton 4x4 (lbs.) 7600 3.73 10,300 3.73
    3/4-ton 4x4 (lbs.) 9600 4.10 12,000 4.10


    Duc

  5. #25
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,772
    Location
    SE Michigan, AZ when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Please don't take this wrong. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
    But I have to ask. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img] Shouldn't you have gotten Aluminum Wheels to match the hitch. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
    I like spending others money. My trailer has those ugly white spoked wheels. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

  6. #26
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    345
    Location
    NE Ohio (Lake County)
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Not being sure of the year of Z71 Suburban tow capacities are for a:

    2004 1/2 ton
    GT4 3.73 5000# dead weight / 7200# WD
    GT5 4.10 5000# dead weight / 8200# WD

    2005 - 2006 1/2 ton
    GU6 3.42 5000# dead weight / 7000# WD
    GT5 4.10 5000# dead weight / 8000# WD

    A Z71 is not available as either a 2wd or 3/4 ton.

    Earlier years can vary. I only have easy access to the years posted.

    edit:
    05 and 06 3/4 ton have a weight carrying capacity of 7500#. Anything over that requires a WD hitch, fifth wheel or goose neck hitch. (Per GM specs. and I beileve the others are the same or less.)

    Kurt

  7. #27
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    254

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    That's similar with the class V hitch on my 2004 Silverado 2500. The hitch is rated for up to 6K or 7K without a WD hitch and 10K or 12K with. Is a WD hitch really worth it for the larger loads?

    Joe

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    93
    Location
    Lake Conroe area, Tx
    Tractor
    John Deere 3720

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Before we turn a lot of good intentions applied to a "Oh Happy Day" post, into a "nine line cotton twine bind" of confusion where those who know go away mad (but unable to agree) and those who dont know are thouroughly confused, I suggest we all consider the irrefutable clarity offered by the following combination of the technical and the simple:

    Slightly Technical Description of a WD hitch:

    The excess weight the WD hitch is distributing is part of the tongue weight plus added weight in the back of the truck. It certainly doesn't reduce the tongue weight. In any case, tongue weight per se isn't what we seek. The tongue weight as a proportion of the total trailer weight is just an analog for the distance the longitudinal center of gravity (LCG) is forward of the pivot point (wheels). The farther forward we get the LCG the more stable the trailer is, other things remaining equal.

    Simple description of a WD hitch:....

    Ron and I hitch up his trailer. The rear of the truck sits way low, the front is way high, and the front wheels don't steer or brake worth a darn 'cuz of this.

    We stick a long pry bar into the back end of his truck frame and pull up hard. The rear rises and the front drops. I have Ron trot along holding that bar up as I drive...the truck drives really well now, but Ron is getting tired. He chains the bar to the trailer tongue so he can take a breather. This works OK on the straights, but is a big problem on curves. We figure out a pivot system for the point the bar attaches to the truck. It turns well, but is really bumpy. Ron's Mrs. says to use spring steel bars. Duh!...Why didn't we think of that? Ron and I, and his Mrs., just invented the weight distributing hitch.

    Now consider the manufacturers of the platform reciever hitch for GM dont really know what kind of nut might be loose at the wheel. If you were the lead project engineer for the hitch manufacturer (assuming you would believe GM doesnt actually manufacture every screw and nut on your car themselves), you would consider the case for the least common denomonator - we'll call him Joe Six Pack, (I like beer too, so dont flame me for that one).

    Joe might drive a 1500 series with inexpensive 15" W/T tires and $3 shocks or very large 17 or maybe 18 inch tires with Rancho Ultra Super Extreme shocks, who knows? (the difference is an example of what COULD significantly affect the vehicle load carrying stability factor - fair?).

    Alright add this - how does the hitch engineer know whether the vehicle is fully loaded with cargo and people or empty? Whether the vehicle is a pickup truck or an SUV, 4:10 or 3:73 gears, long wheelbase or short? Regular towing package, HD towing package, or towing with automatic suspension leveling system? (This all assumes you believe there is a different sticker for every engine and transmission combination in the base case, before all these options are considered).

    Heck, the engineer doesnt know how you will equip your vehicle and having 19 different stickers will certainly result in a sticker mix up mess!

    Bottom line is the sticker on the hitch will state the absolute minimums, ALWAYS leaving the REQUIRED MARGIN OF SAFETY a good engineer who doesnt want his company to get sued will LIBERALLY apply, the only limitation of which is pissing off the marketing department, who is trying to claim more towing capacity than the "other guys".

    This is why there is fine print all over the place and so many different ways to measure the trailering loads - gross, combined, max, tounge, axles, etc. If you have read your manual or been on line trying to find absolutely firm standards to follow you know what I mean.

    I recommend you use your head and always apply common sense. Think about your particular conditions, loading pattern and vehicle capabilities. Use the numbers given by the manufacturer as a guide in designing your system when available. If not available, consider this, if your front wheels leave the ground when you hit a bump, or your vehicle goes straight when you turn the wheel or your brakes dont seem to do the stopping thing well when you are towing, you definitely need to rework your system.

    On the other hand, if your trailer is level and your tow vehicle is level, things seem to be within reasonalble limits of stated tolerances, and the vehicle is under control and operates properly, you are probably OK. Numbers alone are not an absolute substitue (by limitation or by allowance) for common sense. Dont care if the numbers say you can take more, if the vehicle misbehaves - think again. Something is probably not quite right.

    Finally dont believe everything someone puts in print. Heck, if it doesnt make any sense to you it is not worth anything to you and hammering it in may just cause you to memorize something that could in fact be wrong (we all make mistakes - I just read a website that did a very good job of explaining the technical details, then pushed it too far and tried to draw what is called a "static" or "free body" diagram of what goes on with a WD hitch. They got in over their heads as their arrows going in the wrong direction and loading calculations mislabled. Oops!

    Now, in my case, my trailer will clearly be able to out haul my tow vehicle capability (remember my trailer could be rated at 14,000, with only the stroke of a pen on the title - if it were made by someone less conservative than ODOM). But my tractor weighs 2900# before I start adding for implements. If I haul it all I am still clear or very near of the Joe Six Pack base numbers, and if I consider gross combined loading (passengers, cargo, truck, trailer and load), how much I will be hauling it and how far, and on what terrain, it just gets better.

    So one, I load it, think, try and adjust. If it doesnt track well, I will make changes. If I add more gear and somehow figure I need to move it all at once, I may need a different rig.

    Least I leave you with the impression I make no mistakes, I remember once when I was younger (?) I drove a not new 84 1/2 ton Chevy Custom Deluxe (GM code for "rubber floor, stick and AM radio) with a six cyinder granny gear driveline and a v-8 I built in it, air shocks individually plumbed for increased roll stability pumped to 110 psi (before load applied) for 150 miles through hilly terrain with a scaled load of nearly 2000 lbs. Despite being tremendously overloaded, the machine performed well, and I learned a valuable lesson in carrying loads, braking, steering control, etc. I haven't done that again and dont want to, so I try to live and learn.

    Remember Physics (is supposed to be) Phun!

    Drive On!

  9. #29
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    254

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    Thanks for the excellent explaination. Answered many of the questions I had on the WD hitch. Most of my towing has been in the 5-6K range (towing cars and stuff) so I've never really stressed the towing capacity of the truck (but will be in the very near future). Thanks again.

    Joe

    BTW - Physics is Phascinating Phun

  10. #30
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,772
    Location
    SE Michigan, AZ when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Got My New Trailer Today...SWEEET!!

    I would like to make a suggestion. Find someone that has a WD hitch that you can try on your trailer when it is loaded. Maybe your trailer manufacture has one you can try. Most Travel Trailers are equipped with this hitch (not fifth wheel). It's not just the ability to pull the load. It's braking, bumps and uneven roads that are normally transmitted to the hitch without a WD hitch. The most common comment I have heard from people that switched to a WD hitch is that they will never tow without one again.
    Now if they made that Aluminum Hitch in a WD. I would be over at the dealer to pick one up tomorrow. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] I hate having to lift the Reese WD I have to install it into the receiver. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]

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