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  1. #11
    Platinum Member xlr82v2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Quote Originally Posted by chh
    Nice job! Was nice to see that you ground the paint off. You would be suprised at the number of people who do no prep work and expect it to hold and look nice. Give the overhead a try, I used to think it was fun. As long as I had the leathers on anyway.

    Yep, I could have burned through it with some 6010 or 6011, but, what's the fun in that? And, it would have looked like poop... But, that's one of the advantages of SMAW... you can burn through a lot of junk on your material that will stop all of the other processes cold.

    That's the main reason I haven't tried to do any overhead... no leathers! The thought of all that slag dripping down on me doesn't sound like too much fun!!
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  2. #12
    Platinum Member xlr82v2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Quote Originally Posted by johnray13
    When I am welding around hydraulic cylinders, I am always worried about damaging the chromed rod with splatter. I try to cover up vulnerable parts with a welding blanket. Maybe I am too paranoid. I see in the video Brian didn't seem too worried about it.
    I probably should have covered them up... but at the time, I didn't think about it. But, I did check them before I started the tractor back up again... no sign of anything. I think most all the spatter has cooled to the point where it won't damage anything (like the chrome) by the time it travels that far anyway. And with no flat surfact to come to rest on, it just bounces off.
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  3. #13
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Quote Originally Posted by xlr82v2
    .

    That's the main reason I haven't tried to do any overhead... no leathers! The thought of all that slag dripping down on me doesn't sound like too much fun!!
    I got good enough at brazing that I thought I could do it overhead. I got rewarded for that bit of overconfidence with a big glob of molten brass down my left sleeve.

    There is nothing quite like the smell of burning flesh.
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  4. #14
    Platinum Member xlr82v2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    aaah, yes... Burning flesh.

    When I was about 12 or 13 or so, I was helping Dad with some welding projects... Anyway, to make a long story short, somehow one of those big ol' slagballs made it's way down the front of my pants and settled onto a part of my anatomy that I never wanted it to take up residence at.... at first I didn't know what was going on... and neither did my Dad... He couldn't figure out why I was jumping around and yelling...

    Then Dad started laughing his rear end off... I didnt' think it was quite so funny, at least at the time I didn't. Mom didn't think it was so funny either, having just burned a big hole right in the front of a fairly new pair of pants!

    I can laugh about it now...

    If you weld, it's not if, but when Although, I have to admit, I get burned much much less now than when I was younger...
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  5. #15
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Brian, I'm not picking on you, just concerned for your health and safety and that of others who will see you doing it and read your comments and think it must be OK. When you breathe in (you do breathe while welding?) the air drawn into the volume around your face enclosed by the mask is from the plume.

    Welding fumes are hazardous to your health. Damage is cumulative. Doing something to reduce the quantity inhaled is a good thing.

    Having your head shrouded in fumes is not unusual, it is quite the norm in some welding positions. Doing something to reduce the concentration of fumes getting into your lungs is a worthwhile effort even though the health effects may not be noticed for several years.

    I have found that having a fan blowing a little air across you toward the welding action putting the welding downstream of you is a B A D idea as the fumes just whorl around in an eddy and aren't quickly dissapated.

    The best I have found is to have a fan blow across the area where you are working with a sideways breeze not toward you or away but across. You don't need much breeze either, not nearly enough to make problems with your shielding gas whether TIG or the shielding gas generated by flux coated rods.

    I have pretty good lung capacity which is great for free diving/snorkling but I find it useful when, as we often do even if not our favorite thing, find ourselves needing to weld on galvanized materials.

    Imagine the plume you were enveloped by being chock full with galvanizing fumes. Typical welding fumes are NOT GOOD TO BREATHE but galvanized fumes are even worse.

    I know by making this post I risk being flamed by reactionaries who have ever touched or seen a welding machine and didn't immediately drop dead with their lungs pouring out through their nostrils since so many other SAFETY comments are scorned BUT my intent is GOOD. I am NOT an alarmist.

    You have inadvertantly produced a multi-purpose video. One of its purposed is to demonstrate how lack of planning for fume control-mitigation can bury your head in dangerous fumes.

    Pat
    Never wrestle with a pig (however titled) as you just get dirty and the pig has all the fun.

  6. #16
    chh
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    Veteran Member chh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Actually Patrick G you are touching on something that is really starting to be an industry concern. Lincoln electric in its newletters have started talking fume safety. I have a cousin that is a form pro welder. 40' ish and now a truck driver after being told by doctors that he was through with welding due to lung damage. Working in an shop with no exhaust fans whatsoever took it toll on him in a hurry.
    I can tell you that welding galvanized without proper ventilation will make you sicker than a dog.
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.
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  7. #17
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Quote Originally Posted by xlr82v2
    aaah, yes... Burning flesh.

    When I was about 12 or 13 or so, I was helping Dad with some welding projects... Anyway, to make a long story short, somehow one of those big ol' slagballs made it's way down the front of my pants and settled onto a part of my anatomy that I never wanted it to take up residence at.... at first I didn't know what was going on... and neither did my Dad... He couldn't figure out why I was jumping around and yelling...

    Then Dad started laughing his rear end off... I didnt' think it was quite so funny, at least at the time I didn't. Mom didn't think it was so funny either, having just burned a big hole right in the front of a fairly new pair of pants!

    I can laugh about it now...

    If you weld, it's not if, but when Although, I have to admit, I get burned much much less now than when I was younger...
    Never did that when welding, alot down my shirtsleeves and neck.
    When I worked in a foundary on the furnace and poured iron you never wore under wear and never tucked your shirt in and either wore foudary boots or high top work boots laced up tight on top. If you've seen iron splash or a mold blow out you'd know why!!! OUCH!!

  8. #18
    Platinum Member xlr82v2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Patrick,

    I don't think you're picking on me, don't sweat it . I totally understand where you're coming from. Like I said earlier, I was surprised at how the fumes were going right around my helmet... If I wasn't the one in the video, I'd think that the dude doing the welding is either really good at holding his breath, or he's breathing nothing but smoke and fumes. But let me tell you, that definitely was not the case!! Like I said, I could smell the fumes, just like you can smell fried chicken cooking... but the air behind the hood was very breathable... It wasn't until after I raised my hood after finishing a bead that I felt that the fumes had actually assaulted me. If I'd been breathing the fumes in the amount that they were coming up around my helmet, you can be assured that you would have seen a coughing, choking, hacking fit. And I WAS breathing... you (or at least I) can't weld a decent bead while holding your breath. (*Tip to new welders: Don't forget to breathe! Welding a good bead while holding your breath is HARD!)

    I agree, if at all possible, you should try to mitigate the amount of fumes that you breathe in. Especially if welding painted metal, or even far worse, galvanized.

    Zinc fume poisoning (from galvanizing) is very real! I've never heard of any deaths or long term effects from it that I can remember, but I can attest that if you ever get the 'fever, you'll wish you were dead. Back when I was still working on the farm, we welded up some gates from galvanized pipe that we came up with from somewhere. We all drank some milk, and had fans set up to blow the fumes away, and then drank some more milk after we finished, but at the end of the day, we still were feeling the effects of breathing the fumes... not fun! Don't weld galvanized metal if you can avoid it... but sometimes you can't.

    But also like you, I don't want to create an alarmist knee-jerk reaction to normal welding fumes. There's already too much alarmist knee-jerk reaction to EVERYTHING in this country... the People's Republik of Kalifornia is a prime example. Is there ANYTHING that doesn't cause cancer in Kalifornia??? California is becoming a laughing stock. I didn't realize until this year that Christmas lights cause cancer in Kalifornia...

    Just smelling the fumes I don't believe is harmful, especially at the average exposure levels experienced by "hobby" welders like myself and probably 90% of the other welders on this website. Your nose and body will tell you if you're getting too many fumes. Welding has been around a long time, and if the fumes as a whole were that bad, with people dropping like flies from just the slightest inhalation of fumes, welding equipment would not be nearly so available to the general public like it is. Pro weldors would be wearing astronaut suits before they ever struck an arc... Especially in Kalifornia. But that just isn't' the case. There's lots of scientific evidence out there that shows that normal occupational exposure to welding fumes is not harmful. Like all things, different people may react differently, but on the whole...

    Now don't take that to mean that I'm saying that it's OK to inhale all the fumes that you can... that's ludicrous. Just use common sense, and try to minimize the amount that you breathe. If you feel that you're getting too many fumes, then you probably are. If you are quite comfortable breathing the air that you're getting inside your hood, then you're probably OK. Just use the common sense that the Good Lord gave you, (if the public schools haven't totally stripped it all out) and you'll probably be OK.

    I think that's enough on this subject, at least in this thread, I'd rather it didn't evolve into another internet pee for distance contest We can start another thread for that.
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  9. #19
    Platinum Member xlr82v2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Quote Originally Posted by joe48
    Never did that when welding, alot down my shirtsleeves and neck.
    When I worked in a foundary on the furnace and poured iron you never wore under wear and never tucked your shirt in and either wore foudary boots or high top work boots laced up tight on top. If you've seen iron splash or a mold blow out you'd know why!!! OUCH!!
    Thankfully, I haven't had any more go down there since then. I've had a few go through my tennis shoes ( I know, I know...), that's always fun too. Especially when you can't stop, and you just have to grit through it and keep on going... And the ones that go down the front of your shirt are fun too.
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  10. #20
    Platinum Member bx24's Avatar
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    Default Re: Welding Bucket Hooks!

    Welding Fumes:

    I have looked into commercial air hood setups and while they would certainly help with this type of thing, they are not cheap (safety never is)

    In the past I have used a small fan on the floor blowing towards my head (but not towards the weld to blow away the shielding gas). Right now I am looking at using some sort of computer fan hooked up to some sort of hose that would go towards the helmet.

    I am sure I am very guilty of sticking my face right in the fumes. Clean steal is not bad, but like many of you, I recycle old steel where the burning paint makes a lot of bad smoke.

    If I could figure out a simple but effective hood, that would probably be the best solution. Even if you breath clean air, it does not take long to fill up even a large room with bad air. The more I think about it, I think a portable exaust system will be the way to go (especially in the winter time where I don't want to leave the overhead doors open all the time to vent things)

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