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  1. #21
    Platinum Member BlacknTan's Avatar
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    May 2006
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    Adirondacks of NY
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    Kubota B-7800

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    When I started my trade as a Diemaker in 1968, this was one of the first things I learned. My mentor gave me a big box of dull drills, and after i wolfed down my lunch, I'd go to the grinder and practice. Once one realizes that tools cut metal by a wedging action, and understand the clearance is needed everywhere, it becomes a pretty simple task. I could sharpen very small drills by hand also, until Father Time took his inevitable toll... But, I can still get the job done. It's like riding a bike, once one learns properly, you never forget!

    Learn the fundamentals and practice. Like any manual skill, there's not much more to it than that.

  2. #22
    Silver Member
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    Mar 2012
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    Taylorsville, GA
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    3000 Ford 66' 260A International Backhoe

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by Oaktree View Post
    Same here. Just couldn't get the hang of it, just ended up making them worse.
    Picked up a drill dr. at a yard sale for $25, much better.

    Boss man purchased a drill doctor. I think it was the best one available at the time but we could never get the hang of it, not sure what we were doing wrong or if maybe something else was wrong?? A lot of folks have them and love them. I'll probably just keep on sharpening. As I said earlier it don't always work so just chunk it in the scape box.
    I've got a cutting torch and a welder sooo YEAH it'll fit!!

  3. #23
    Platinum Member
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    Maine

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by Steave View Post
    You'd be surprised how many folks don't resharpen their bits. I have lots of bits I've picked up over the years while on construction jobs. They are laying everywhere, some broke but most just a little dull.
    for most cases the simple answer is economics. small bits are very cheap and labor isn't cheap anymore. larger bits are certainly worthwhile to resharpen, but i'd bet that anyone in business wouldn't sharpen bits under 3/8", or maybe even larger, especially if you are out on a jobsite. if you are in a shop that has an apprentice, or floor sweeper, or other low-end job, you can always task that person to resharpen bits when there is nothing else needed, but otherwise you probably don't want an employee sharpening bits while the expensive machine that uses those bits sits idle.

  4. #24
    Silver Member
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    Mar 2012
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    3000 Ford 66' 260A International Backhoe

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by lostcause View Post
    for most cases the simple answer is economics. small bits are very cheap and labor isn't cheap anymore. larger bits are certainly worthwhile to resharpen, but i'd bet that anyone in business wouldn't sharpen bits under 3/8", or maybe even larger, especially if you are out on a jobsite. if you are in a shop that has an apprentice, or floor sweeper, or other low-end job, you can always task that person to resharpen bits when there is nothing else needed, but otherwise you probably don't want an employee sharpening bits while the expensive machine that uses those bits sits idle.

    Yea, you're right. Thanks to the throw aways I have enough bits to supply me and family & friends. I worked at a small family owned shop and we shared info simular to this Forum except about other topics. You're right we wouldn't take time during the day to sharpen bits but after hours we'd piddle around with different stuff.
    I've got a cutting torch and a welder sooo YEAH it'll fit!!

  5. #25
    Super Member crazyal's Avatar
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    Dec 2003
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    Northern Vermont

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    I use to do them by hand on a grinder. Now I use the drill doctor. I was taught by necessity as a kid. Either I learned to sharpen bits or I wasn't going to be able to repair my atvs or dirt bikes. You quickly learn to compare good bits with ones you sharpened to figure out what you did wrong. You also experiment with angles.

    With the DD I can look at the bit once done and know right off if I've done it correctly. Also the DD gets the angles correct every time. You would be amazed how far off you can get when you sharpen a bit over and over again.
    Kubota L4240,Case 580K backhoe, Case 450 Dozer

  6. #26
    Silver Member
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    3000 Ford 66' 260A International Backhoe

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by deereman75 View Post
    You may remember many months ago, I asked about sharpening drill bits on a grinder, and I said I had someone to teach me. Well I never did get around to talking to him, but I had watched a few videos. Yesterday, I decided to grab a dull bit, and try sharpening it on the new grinder. All I can say is wow. It cut steel like a new bit. I have since gone through my assorted dull dormers, some old post drill bits, and a bunch of morse taper bits, sharpened them, and they all cut aluminum like butter. I am for the first time getting curly shavings with a hand drill. It is so easy to do, and takes so little practice, I am shocked more people dont do this. After learning it in 1 bit, I cant believe those drill doctors sell at all. Now I cant wait to set up a bit only grinder.
    When you set up your bit only grinder are you going with a regular grinder or are you going with the slow wheel and water bath? I've always wanted a water bath slow wheel grinder. Think they're mostly for chisels and tools of that nature but still have considered one.
    I've got a cutting torch and a welder sooo YEAH it'll fit!!

  7. #27
    Gold Member
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    Cos, N.H.
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    Kioti LK3054xs

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by Steave View Post
    Boss man purchased a drill doctor. I think it was the best one available at the time but we could never get the hang of it, not sure what we were doing wrong or if maybe something else was wrong?? A lot of folks have them and love them. I'll probably just keep on sharpening. As I said earlier it don't always work so just chunk it in the scape box.
    Guy I bought mine from called it Dr. Kevorkian...apparently he killed enough bits in it. I got the hang of the DD pretty quick, even without the manual. YMMV I guess.

  8. #28
    Veteran Member deereman75's Avatar
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    canada
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    1946 cockshutt 60

    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by Steave View Post
    When you set up your bit only grinder are you going with a regular grinder or are you going with the slow wheel and water bath? I've always wanted a water bath slow wheel grinder. Think they're mostly for chisels and tools of that nature but still have considered one.
    I have an old belt drive grinder, I am going to tune up, and put on 8 inch norton 3x wheels. Cut faster, last longer, and run cooler. Eventually, I want to get an 18 inch wet stone, but nor for a while. After I set up the bit grinder, I will probably build a 12 inch grinder. Also, at school today, the metal shop teacher (a tool and die maker) showed me the right angles, and some other advise. He said except for the angle, everything else was perfect. Not bad for learning how to yesterday.
    Never carry gasoline in your car trunk. If you do, atleast use some sort of container.
    -red green

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    i think the knowledge and experience of how to sharpen a bit is invaluable to learn, but probably becoming increasingly useless in practical application. everything we do in life becomes more automated as the years go by. the only time things are done "old school" are tasks done for ourselves, and not ones done in daily production. picture a contractor telling his guys to use hammers and not nailers. how about using hot rivets instead of bolts? time is money, and old school just won't cut it anymore in the production world. i believe the same to be true of drill sharpeners. machines are consistent and accurate, where people aren't - no matter how much they argue otherwise.

    at the same time, i believe it is always important to understand the basic mechanics behind the operation of any tool. this helps when understanding why something isn't working the way it should, or when you need to do something and you don't have access to the hardware that does the task. i work in a field that is predominately computer controlled now, but i believe that all people who learn should understand how it works when done without a computer. this makes the operator better able to understand the hows and whys that the machine takes care of automatically.

  10. #30
    Veteran Member deereman75's Avatar
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    Default Re: Drill bit sharpening

    Quote Originally Posted by lostcause View Post
    i think the knowledge and experience of how to sharpen a bit is invaluable to learn, but probably becoming increasingly useless in practical application. everything we do in life becomes more automated as the years go by. the only time things are done "old school" are tasks done for ourselves, and not ones done in daily production. picture a contractor telling his guys to use hammers and not nailers. how about using hot rivets instead of bolts? time is money, and old school just won't cut it anymore in the production world. i believe the same to be true of drill sharpeners. machines are consistent and accurate, where people aren't - no matter how much they argue otherwise.

    at the same time, i believe it is always important to understand the basic mechanics behind the operation of any tool. this helps when understanding why something isn't working the way it should, or when you need to do something and you don't have access to the hardware that does the task. i work in a field that is predominately computer controlled now, but i believe that all people who learn should understand how it works when done without a computer. this makes the operator better able to understand the hows and whys that the machine takes care of automatically.
    For my use, I would rather sharpen them with a grinder I have, then buy a tool that can only sharpen bits. If I had to sharpen like 50 bits a day, then I can see getting a sharpener. I agree that if I was a pro shop, I would likely have a sharpener.
    Never carry gasoline in your car trunk. If you do, atleast use some sort of container.
    -red green

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