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  1. #1
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    Default Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Home Depot has an ac/dc stick welder for $387. This seems like a pretty decent price to me, but I noticed it is rated 225 amps for AC and 125 for DC. Is this normal? Would the 125 amp DC penetrate as well as the AC 225?

    Here it is! http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=100053881&storeId=10051&l angId=-1&catalogId=10053&ci_sku=100053881&ci_kw={keyword} &kwd={keyword}&cm_mmc=shopping-_-googleads-_-pla-_-100053881&ci_gpa=pla

    Good price?

  2. #2
    Super Star Member LD1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Probabally not a bad price. The AC only versions still bring ~$150 on c-list in old and rough shape, and rarely see one that is AC/DC.

    I am not sure on the AC-DC conversion thing, but it probabally has to do with the transformers and the fact that DC is a single polarity (flat line) and the AC alternates. Therefore with the size of the components inside limit the dc to 130.

    But I can tell you that 130DC is nowhere near as hot as 225AC. With the welders I have used, it seems to be about 20-25%. 100A on DC is about the same as 125A on AC. So I'd say 130A DC would weld about like 160A on AC
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  3. #3
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Its a Chinese Welder, but the specs are so much better than that lincoln you are considering. I have had its little brother the PA160 for a couple of years and it has paid me back already.. they work really well. And you can pick it up with one hand. Or you can look at the new PA160 with the HF start for TIG and will even take a foot pedal. It is your money and your choice, I am just saying what I would do/did. Good luck.

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  4. #4
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Or look at this little 140 amp rig that will run on dual voltage up to 85 amp with 3/32 electrodes on 120 volts or 140 amps with 1/8 inch electrodes on 240 volts. and comes complete with a 17v TIG torch for scratch start TIG all for $275.
    I think there is some kinda of TBN discount if you contact Mark here on this forum

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Well I am not 100% sure what you were saying. Is the Lincoln a chinese made or the PA? I know the Lincolns weigh a ton but have proven themselves over the years as far a durability. As for TIG I really doubt I would ever learn it, I will have enough trouble relearning stick, not a definite no, but just would be surprised.

    The PA seems to be DC only, and I wonder, don't know, but are there times when AC is better than DC? If so it would nice to have the choice. As for portability, I don't move mine anywhere but in the shop, since all my work is mine. I don't do welding for $$$.

  6. #6
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Quote Originally Posted by handirifle View Post
    Well I am not 100% sure what you were saying. Is the Lincoln a chinese made or the PA? I know the Lincolns weigh a ton but have proven themselves over the years as far a durability. As for TIG I really doubt I would ever learn it, I will have enough trouble relearning stick, not a definite no, but just would be surprised.

    The PA seems to be DC only, and I wonder, don't know, but are there times when AC is better than DC? If so it would nice to have the choice. As for portability, I don't move mine anywhere but in the shop, since all my work is mine. I don't do welding for $$$.
    The PA series of Everlast welders are Chinese made, I have a nice Lincoln225 I would let go cheap, I prefer the Chinese welder With DC only.. Haven't struck an arc with my Lincoln since I got the Everlast. Nothing wrong with a good Lincoln. And being a transformer welder, will probably be welding when I am dead and gone. My Lincoln is on a hand truck so it can be moved. I recommend DC over AC.. The only think I can think of where I would use the Lincoln is maybe if I ever built a Carbon Arc torch for heating. but there are many drawbacks/hazards with them. Good Luck in your welder search.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    My 2 cents I like any of the small AC/DC buzzbox welders (e.g. Lincoln AC225/DC15, Hobart Stickmate 225AC/DC160, Miller Thunderbolt 225AC/DC160, or alternatively the older Miller Thunderbolt 225AC/DC150 which has crank on top).

    While your price looks very good for a new unit and I am a huge Lincoln fan after previously owning a Lincoln AC225; I would put a bit more cash with it and and pick up the Hobart Stickmate if you are just dead set on purchasing brand new unit (best guess would be $440 or so on a TSC sale). The Hobart gives you infintely adjustable amperage control at the single amp level over the Lincoln which will be tapped in increments of 10-15 amps per setting. Also you get a few more DC amps with the Hobart. Miller is exact same welder as the Hobart but will cost more as you will have to buy through LWS.

    Myself: I would not purchase any buzzbox new. This things are nearly bullet proof and last forever you can pick up a clean one used on craigslists for $200 or so with careful shopping. When shopping used though might be less picky on the brand and snag whichever in good condition at a good price.

    AC is usually only an advantage in welding when fighting arc blow around magnetized metal. DC is slightly easier to use in ALMOST ALL other welding circumstance (DC is roughly 15% to 17% more efficient than AC). That said I have yet to weld at current higher than 140 amps on DC although I have used my buzzbox to crude cut at higher settings and AC works fine for this. Heck any of my welding is not any better on DC than it is on AC, but that is not saying much in my case, but DC is slightly easier to use. If buying on the cheap, I would not be afraid of even an AC only buzzbox but I would not buy a new one and I would not pay over $125 for one used. If your budget can afford it go AC/DC as it is more versatile.

    Also you will need AC tranformer type buzzbox machine if you want to try Twin Carbon Torch as a nearly free way of heating metal for bending, brazing, silver soldering, freeing rusted nuts if oxy/acet is not available. Inverters will not work for Twin Carbon arc torch. For the record there are no significant hazzards regarding a Twin carbon arc torch as long as you cover all exposed skin, wear your welding helmet, and do not breath the smoke - or in other words all the exact same practices that should be followed if you are simply welding.
    Last edited by rankrank1; 06-26-2012 at 03:32 PM.

  8. #8
    Super Star Member IslandTractor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    The old Tombstone welders from Lincoln still do what they have always done but boy do they pay a weight/storage penalty compared to inverter based welders. The under $400 price can be beat by some Chinese/Malaysian etc inverter welders of equal power. I have a Miller Maxstar 150 which is significantly more money but way more portable and flexible (110/220). Honestly the best bang for the welding buck might be the little 110V inverter stick from HF for $150. I think that is only a 80amp machine though but is about the size of a lunch box and weighs about that much too. Before buying a tombstone, think carefully about how you will use the welder. If you have a big garage with at least a 30amp 220V outlet and don't mind stepped power levels then the Lincoln sure is a reasonable option. If you ever would benefit from 110V (good up to 80 with 15amp service and well over 100 with 20amp 110V service) then a dual voltage or just 110V machine might be an advantage. If portability means anything (I mean even moving it into your driveway) then an inverter based welder is worth considering. Everlast, ArcOne and a few others are all reasonably priced and give excellent bang for the buck if you can stand not having Lincoln red or Miller blue. The Everlast Powerarc 140 at $275 is certainly a bargain.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Quote Originally Posted by rankrank1 View Post
    My 2 cents I like any of the small AC/DC buzzbox welders (e.g. Lincoln AC225/DC15, Hobart Stickmate 225AC/DC160, Miller Thunderbolt 225AC/DC160, or alternatively the older Miller Thunderbolt 225AC/DC150 which has crank on top).

    While your price looks very good for a new unit and I am a huge Lincoln fan after previously owning a Lincoln AC225; I would put a bit more cash with it and and pick up the Hobart Stickmate if you are just dead set on purchasing brand new unit (best guess would be $440 or so on a TSC sale). The Hobart gives you infintely adjustable amperage control at the single amp level over the Lincoln which will be tapped in increments of 10-15 amps per setting. Also you get a few more DC amps with the Hobart. Miller is exact same welder as the Hobart but will cost more as you will have to buy through LWS.

    Myself: I would not purchase any buzzbox new. This things are nearly bullet proof and last forever you can pick up a clean one used on craigslists for $200 or so with careful shopping. When shopping used though might be less picky on the brand and snag whichever in good condition at a good price.

    AC is usually only an advantage in welding when fighting arc blow around magnetized metal. DC is slightly easier to use in ALMOST ALL other welding circumstance (DC is roughly 15% to 17% more efficient than AC). That said I have yet to weld at current higher than 140 amps on DC although I have used my buzzbox to crude cut at higher settings and AC works fine for this. Heck any of my welding is not any better on DC than it is on AC, but that is not saying much in my case, but DC is slightly easier to use. If buying on the cheap, I would not be afraid of even an AC only buzzbox but I would not buy a new one and I would not pay over $125 for one used. If your budget can afford it go AC/DC as it is more versatile.

    Also you will need AC tranformer type buzzbox machine if you want to try Twin Carbon Torch as a nearly free way of heating metal for bending, brazing, silver soldering, freeing rusted nuts if oxy/acet is not available. Inverters will not work for Twin Carbon arc torch. For the record there are no significant hazzards regarding a Twin carbon arc torch as long as you cover all exposed skin, wear your welding helmet, and do not breath the smoke - or in other words all the exact same practices that should be followed if you are simply welding.

    Thanks tons of experience and info here, that's why I post my sometimes lame questions.
    As for new/old, I posted THAT new one only cause you almost never see a used DC unit anywhere near here. I just missed one, and it's the first I have seen in 2 years.
    I see the AC boxes a lot, and there is one now for $175 with 20ft leads, which I know the wire isn't cheap, so that fits your $125 limit plus about $50 for the long cables, right? As for price, even that one is really more than I can afford, but it seemed reasonable.

    I have looked at the HF models, and am honestly tempted. I see the rating of 20% at high amperage but honestly I doubt I will ever be welding anything with amps that high, so I am sure the percentage goes up when amperage goes down.

    I come up with a thick metal job about once a year or so, so maybe I will look them over closer.

    As for the amperage, I am not sure I am good enough to know if I am 10 amps high or low.

    What you just described about the twin arc, is all I (now) know. It sounds like it might be handy though, but depends on cost. I have a small MC size oxy/acet set.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Lincoln AC/DC welder

    Quote Originally Posted by IslandTractor View Post
    The old Tombstone welders from Lincoln still do what they have always done but boy do they pay a weight/storage penalty compared to inverter based welders. The under $400 price can be beat by some Chinese/Malaysian etc inverter welders of equal power. I have a Miller Maxstar 150 which is significantly more money but way more portable and flexible (110/220). Honestly the best bang for the welding buck might be the little 110V inverter stick from HF for $150. I think that is only a 80amp machine though but is about the size of a lunch box and weighs about that much too. Before buying a tombstone, think carefully about how you will use the welder. If you have a big garage with at least a 30amp 220V outlet and don't mind stepped power levels then the Lincoln sure is a reasonable option. If you ever would benefit from 110V (good up to 80 with 15amp service and well over 100 with 20amp 110V service) then a dual voltage or just 110V machine might be an advantage. If portability means anything (I mean even moving it into your driveway) then an inverter based welder is worth considering. Everlast, ArcOne and a few others are all reasonably priced and give excellent bang for the buck if you can stand not having Lincoln red or Miller blue. The Everlast Powerarc 140 at $275 is certainly a bargain.
    As for portability, I already have a 110v, 90 amp mig that I use mostly flux wire in, and it has done a yoemans duty for me, but I occasionally need more amperage, like my upcoming trailer axle replacement, where I need to weld the spring hanger tabs onto the frame. I may just have to do it with mine in several passes. But someday I would like to build items like a log splitter, and I doubt the little mig will penetrate deep enough to hold the wedge against a 30 ton ram. I do not get a good mental picture when I see the wedge go flying.......

    Most if not all my welding, is done in my shop, where the mig plugs into a dedicated 20 amp circuit, and any new machine will have it's own 110/220 circuit of what ever amperage is needed, so that won't be a problem. My workshop is 24x30 so anything I plan on making will easily fit inside.

    My preference is for a machine of at least 160 amps, maybe more, just to keep the duty time up.

    HF has some 225 amp machines, that I THINK are inverter machines, but can't see that in the specs. They have a low duty cycle (20%) but that's at top amps and I doubt I'd ever need that. I cannot ever see me welding anything that needs that much power, or honestly, me even knowing that I DID need it. :-)

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