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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shield Arc
    This is a very tough decision to make!
    On one hand the average guy can do anything with 6011 that he can do with 6010.
    It might not run 6011 either without the special port.
    I have the little stick welder (140A) from Everlast and the simmilar one from longevity. Both won't run 6011 for more than three seconds before cutting out. And you have keep the end of the rod below the surface to do that. No way to wip and pause. But I am very happy with both units. Someone that I know offered to buy witch ever one I like the least, but I don't want to part with either one.
    Would love to get one with the 6010 port, but don't want to give up the dual voltage (120/240) option.
    I have a miller dynasty 200 so I can always use that, but I hate to lug arround a $4K machine.
    Dan H.

  2. #62
    Super Member Shield Arc's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    Quote Originally Posted by CNC Dan View Post
    It might not run 6011 either without the special port.
    I was only going by post # 24 in this thread.
    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/w...-broken-3.html


    Did you ever get that book? If so how do you like it?


    Miller Dynasty 300.
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  3. #63
    Epic Contributor k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    Quote Originally Posted by CNC Dan View Post
    It might not run 6011 either without the special port.
    I have the little stick welder (140A) from Everlast and the simmilar one from longevity. Both won't run 6011 for more than three seconds before cutting out. And you have keep the end of the rod below the surface to do that. No way to wip and pause. But I am very happy with both units. Someone that I know offered to buy witch ever one I like the least, but I don't want to part with either one.
    Would love to get one with the 6010 port, but don't want to give up the dual voltage (120/240) option.
    I have a miller dynasty 200 so I can always use that, but I hate to lug arround a $4K machine.
    Interesting on the PA140, my PA160 runs 6011 very well, but it does have the 6010 port, which I have never used, as I never bought any 6010, and don't really plant on it. The new PA160sth does not have the 6010 port. Of course the PA160 I have is not dual voltage.

    James K0UA
    James K0UA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner NRA Life Member How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN .


  4. #64
    Epic Contributor k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    Quote Originally Posted by joshuabardwell View Post
    It's interesting you suggest the PA200 or the Stickweld 250. It seems to me like the leading general-purpose machine in the Everlast line right now is the PA-160STH. 160 amps should be more than enough stick for any home repair that one is going to do, and the ability to expand into foot-pedal TIG lets the machine reach down into sheet metal and do other very fine work for which stick is ill-suited. Even if a person didn't want to invest in a gas cylinder, TIG torch, pedal, etc... right now, they could use the PA-160 as a fine stick machine until one day they decided to branch out. What's your thinking for going up to 200-250 amps and leaving TIG out?
    Very good question, my only thinking was that he seemed to be leaning towards welding heavy duty materiel's only and did not think he would ever need the TIG options, or so it seemed to me.. Now me I would get the PA160sth, with the foot pedal, because I seldom need to weld with anything higher than 140 amps, and I love to TIG.. I like scratch start TIG, but I would really like to try HF start, and a foot pedal. I feel the need A lot of guys don't want to mess with learning TIG, and do their sheet metal stuff with MIG, plus MIG is faster to learn and faster to weld too.

    James K0UA
    James K0UA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner NRA Life Member How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN .


  5. #65
    Super Member daugen's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    for us unwashed and dumb, could you explain what makes a 6010 rod "special" and why a separate port would make it run better?
    General purpose rod? Do some rods work with AC and some with DC better?
    sorry, you guys are talking over my head, which clearly doesn't take much.
    2012 Kubota L5740HSTC3 with FEL and Long solid bucket grapple, TNT, CA forks and stump bucket, Fred Cain subsoiler, County Line potato plow, County Line 1 bottom plow, 1986 Gravely 8199G with tow behind DR rototiller, 50" deck+40" Gravely wing mowers, Echo 450-18 & 600-24, Echo PPT280, 2014 JD X750 diesel garden tractor, 1968 Cub Cadet 125 under renovation, Husky-Speeco 35 ton splitter, ETA heavy duty rake and blade, Northern Tools 55 gal orchard sprayer, tow behind 8hp Little Wonder blower,

  6. #66
    Silver Member SHORT KID's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    weld grinding tips needed-dscf0148-small-jpgweld grinding tips needed-dscf0149-small-jpgdaugen That is the David Bradley and that is the hood in the open position, showing the fuel tank and engine. The suburbanite was used by nurseries and gardeners because of its small size. I don't have any attachments for it but they had mowers,cycle bars and cultivators for them.

  7. #67
    Epic Contributor k0ua's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    Daugen that Lincoln AC225 is the exact same machine that is setting in my basement, I haven't used in about 3 years since I got my Everlast DC Inverter PA160. that one does look new, but mine is in good shape, has extra long leads on ground and stinger,(about 3 times longer than those) looks almost that good, and comes with a hand cart and a helmet, and I will throw in a handful of 6011 rods.. If you want an AC machine, come to Branson, and haul it off,, what you say $150? (heck the leads are probably worth $50 at least)

    James K0UA
    James K0UA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner NRA Life Member How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN .


  8. #68
    Super Member Shield Arc's Avatar
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    6010 is one of the best rods you can use to run over paint, rust, and general crap. But 6011 will do the same thing. 6010 is a DC only rod, where as 6011 is DC & AC rod. I think Mark said the reason for the special 6010 port is it has an increased OCV, (open circuit voltage). I understand most of these little inverter machines will not run 6010. Miller has a couple that people complain about all the time.

    Until joining these tractor forums the thought of using AC for anything but Tig welding aluminum never crossed my mind. So I gave it a try. Here is some 7018 I ran with my Montgomery Wards buzz box. The sound really set me back, and I noticed 7018 didn't want to wet out like on a DC machine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails weld grinding tips needed-first-pass-jpg   weld grinding tips needed-three-passes-jpg  


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  9. #69
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    Quote Originally Posted by daugen View Post
    I have to power this off a 6500 watt gen with a 220 port, that puts out 27 amps
    You should do your research before you buy to make sure that the welder will run successfully off a generator. I don't know the details, but some welders say they're not rated for generators unless the generator puts out "clean" power. Also, the current draw when you strike the arc can be much higher than when the machine is running. If the generator is not able to keep up, the voltage will drop, and you will find it very hard to strike the arc. In other words, your generator may be rated for 27 amps, but you may still find it hard to strike an arc at max output of a welder drawing close to 27 amps. You should consult with a pro like Mark at Everlast or Simon at Longevity to confirm that whatever you want to buy will run acceptably on your generator.

    I had originally planned to run my welder off my generator, but after looking at all the complications, and especially after considering I'd end up spending around $100 on a pigtail to convert my generator's twist-lock receptacle to my welder's 6-50 plug, I just ended up putting in a 220v receptacle near my service panel. If you have two spare breaker spots in your service panel, it's not too hard. I realize that this may not be an option for everybody, such as renters, but I would give it a second look if possible.

    so I don't think going over a 160 size is going to work for me.
    My only objection to that unit is that it's made in China. Problem is the smaller Hobarts are too
    if I'm not mistaken, you can't depend upon country of origin.
    This is a common objection. Many "USA-made" names are actually made in China and assembled in America. And even if they are technically "made in America," they are often made from Chinese parts. There is no question that a Chinese-made product can be as good or as bad as the manufacturer is willing to pay to make it.

    But the bottom line is the product is either built well or not, no matter where it's built.
    It's all in the spec, the quality of mfg and quality control.
    But if this unit costs say 450 and the same capability US made one costs a hundred bucks more,
    I'll pay it. Problem is the cost is usually a lot more.
    Right. The equivalent US models are often 2x the price of an Everlast or Longevity. My impression is that if the Chinese model doesn't fail within the first 10-20 hours, it's probably going to last as long as anything else. So really put some heat on it during the first 30 days and then relax.

    The other thing is that I know Mark is a regular here at TBN, and I know he values his reputation, so even if I had a little hesitation about buying Chinese (which I don't, but if I did), knowing that Mark has done right by others here would reassure me some. I wouldn't consider myself to be buying from Everlast; I'd be buying from Mark.

    I've ruled out buying used, even something allegedly "such a deal" like this:
    Lincoln Electric Arc Welder Brand New for Sale / Trade
    for all I know it came out of a flooded basement. Or shall we say was never paid for...
    So, going to buy new this time.
    I wouldn't hesitate to buy a transformer-based welder used. Those things are tanks; there is just not much in there to go wrong. If it strikes and holds an arc, it's probably about as good as the day it was sold. With a DC welder, the diodes can fail, which you can quickly determine by trying to strike an arc and weld with it. You'll know in a heartbeat. Of course, if you never welded before, you may want to bring a friend who can strike an arc. Open the case up and look to see if it's full of corrosion or scorch marks. If it's dusty-or-better, you're probably good to go. There are lots and lots of those old machines sitting in attics, garages, and barns, that will sell for $100-$150 all day long, and will serve somebody until their dying day. That being said, I definitely understand the appeal of buying new, and you can get a lot of whiz-bang features, like hot start and arc force control, in the inverter-based machines.

  10. #70
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    Default Re: weld grinding tips needed

    Quote Originally Posted by k0ua View Post
    Very good question, my only thinking was that he seemed to be leaning towards welding heavy duty materiel's only and did not think he would ever need the TIG options, or so it seemed to me.. A lot of guys don't want to mess with learning TIG, and do their sheet metal stuff with MIG, plus MIG is faster to learn and faster to weld too.
    I noticed that too. Honestly, I don't know what he intends to do, but I'm surprised to hear him talking about 1/2" and thicker. I can't really imagine what "around-the-farm" repairs would involve metal that thick. That sounds a lot like structural stuff to me. I look at my trailer, my tractor, even my truck... hardly anything on there is over 3/8", and most is under 1/4".

    As for MIG, when I first started welding, I had to decide between stick or wire-feed, and I settled on stick. I can see now that if my main concern was just git-r-done, MIG would be the right choice. Not that MIG doesn't require skill too, but with MIG, you can really lay down the welds with an efficiency and ease that you can't do with stick. Oh, and did I mention no cleaning slag either? Yeah. Gotta love that. MIG machines can also get down to a thinness that stick struggles with. But I always have to do things the hard way, and I do like the simplicity of stick. No gas, no bottles, no gun, no feed wheels. Just an electrode, a stick, and a ground clamp. As for TIG, I just think TIG is a really beautiful process, and I mean that in every sense of the word too--aesthetically and everything. I look forward to learning TIG someday.

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