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  1. #1
    Platinum Member Scotty Dive's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    824
    Location
    Ct
    Tractor
    Yanmar 2020D

    Default Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    So the recent thread on a stuck clutch got me thinking. I really want to make my clutch last for a LOOOOOOOng time to avoid splitting her in half. I thought I read on a thread once that a tractor clutch is different that a clutch in a car or truck. I know when I am working my tractor that I ride the clutch or rather fully depress it when I am shifting from forward to back on the powershift or when I need to stop and dump whats in the loader or when I am inching forward or back. Is this hurting my clutch prematurely and if is there a better way to accomplish loader work and maneuvering without relying on the clutch so much?
    Thanks,

    Scotty Dive
    Yanmar YM2020D "Git er Done Too"
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  2. #2
    Elite Member
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    Dec 2009
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    2,790
    Location
    gilmer tx
    Tractor
    yanmar 2002d

    Default Re: Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    I've never got to experiance the powershift so I can only comment on my gear drive clutching. I make it a point to avoid riding the clutch. Not saying I never do, but it's a rarity. My opinion is that is the quickest way to to injure a clutch. Just my 2 cents.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    919
    Location
    Covington, GA
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    My tractor has a two stage clutch. The first stage is the drive and the second is for the PTO. Riding with your foot on the pedal could be causing the throw out bearing to spin excessively just like if you drive your car with your foot on the clutch pedal. I probably keep my foot on the clutch pedal too much when doing shuttle work but that is a small percentage of the hours on the tractor.

    But I think you are asking if keeping the clutch pedal depressed when dumping a load is hurting anything. My answer is no. I do not use the clutch to hold a position on a hill. I use the brakes for that. I use fourth gear to scoop up manure, 7th gear out of the dump, 9th gear across the pasture, 7th gear in the compost area to dump. 6 months later I use 4th to dig the compost out and maneuver to dump in the back of the pickup truck. I just use whatever gear is appropriate and try to choose gears so I do not have to ride the clutch.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member rScotty's Avatar
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    Apr 2001
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    1,036
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    Rural mountains - Colorado
    Tractor
    Many in the past. Today, a Kubota M59, JD530, 2 Yanmars - 16 & 33 hp, & a JD310SG

    Default Re: Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty Dive View Post
    So the recent thread on a stuck clutch got me thinking. I really want to make my clutch last for a LOOOOOOOng time to avoid splitting her in half. I thought I read on a thread once that a tractor clutch is different that a clutch in a car or truck. I know when I am working my tractor that I ride the clutch or rather fully depress it when I am shifting from forward to back on the powershift or when I need to stop and dump whats in the loader or when I am inching forward or back. Is this hurting my clutch prematurely and if is there a better way to accomplish loader work and maneuvering without relying on the clutch so much?
    When I have back and forth work to do I try to pick a range where I use powershift instead of clutching at all. But when it's necessary I don't hesitate to clutch. Neither of mine have ever needed a clutch and both have done a lot of loader work. So clutches can last a long time. Be sure to use the pedal hold down device if the tractor is going to sit for awhile. That avoids rust on the pressure plate.
    If it comes to it, splitting the tractor is not the end of the world. It's mostly unbolting and then bolting things up again.
    luck, rScotty.
    Pride of place goes to our 2 cylinder John Deer 530. With her loader, PS, clutched PTO, and remote hydraulics she's as modern & useful today as 50 years ago. And has a more comfortable seat, too.
    A Kubota M59 & a JD310SG for TLB work....giving us options on doing heavy jobs.
    We'll not forget Mr. Big & Mrs. Little - 33 & 16 hp Yanmars - now gone.
    And a line-up of well-used implements that still work better than they look.


  5. #5
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    Central florida
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    you shouldn't ride a clutch. it's not meant to be a full time speed control device.

    slipping it to get going or engage a pto is what it's made for.. otherwise it's made to lokup.

    I don't have a powershift currently to compair too.. but those function

  6. #6
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    3,246
    Location
    Kansas
    Tractor
    YM3810D Yanmar

    Default Re: Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    I have gotten in the habit of clutching when using my PS in higher gears and higher rpm's its a lot less shock on the final drive etc. When tilling I dont though I set the tiller spinning down in the dirt and shift into 1st and shift up w/o clutch that works like a charm.

    Its amazing to me these clutches and throw out bearings work at all when we buy grey market machines considering the wet environment they came from. Id guess they get replaced fairly often and we may be the benefactor of that but that's only a thought.
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  7. #7
    Super Member kenmac's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
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    5,872
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Tractor
    yanmar 3110D

    Default Re: Proper Yanmar Clutch Operation

    Quote Originally Posted by Car Doc View Post
    I have gotten in the habit of clutching when using my PS in higher gears and higher rpm's its a lot less shock on the final drive etc.



    Its amazing to me these clutches and throw out bearings work at all when we buy grey market machines considering the wet environment they came from. Id guess they get replaced fairly often and we may be the benefactor of that but that's only a thought.
    I do the same....it's alot less shock on me as well


    Mine had new T O bearing and clutch installed when I bought it
    Yanmar 3110D
    07 Dodge 2500 5.9 Cummins
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    Honda 300 4 trax
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    16' Tow Master Dump Trailer ,20' Yanmar Hauler

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