6.0 Power Stroke Questions

   #1  

podagrower

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By default, I have found myself in charge of maintaining a company truck. 2006 6.0 PSD, F350, 4x4 flatbed. We finally got to 36,000 miles on it this year (yes really), and I checked with the garage that was doing the oil changes, and the oil changes were the only work ever done. So I had them do the 30,000 mile service, and that's where the fun started. I don't think we need a new mechanic, but it is possible. The truck has been back to them twice since the service, and the check engine light is on again.

The first check engine light was obvious enough, a turbo hose had split, truck was down on power.

The second check engine light was not so obvious, the mechanic said the turbo and MAP sensor were not in agreement on pressures, so they replaced the MAP sensor.

The current check engine light, I'm going to guess is the same thing.

I don't have the exact code, but I will have to get it out of the computer shortly. The mechanic says we can replace the turbo or ignore the check engine light. Neither of these is a good option. It doesn't need a new turbo-I towed a 14,000 pound trailer with it right after the MAP sensor was replaced (before the check engine light came on the third time), and the truck was not down on power, temps were normal.

I'm assuming that at some point with the check engine light on, the truck will go into "limp" mode and cut the power and richen the fuel? (Not that you would notice a decrease in mileage with this pig, but power would be missed).

Anybody have a good starting point to keeping this engine happy?
 
   #2  

doxford jim

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1959 MF-65 sold, 2007 Jinma 554 diesel.
6.0 litre engine has been a real dog for Ford and it's customers. The engine has quite a reputation for needing repairs - try googling and see what you can come up with. It sure sounds like the mechanic really isn't up to snuff on these engines and setups.
Good luck with the repairs - there seem to be a lot of them to do.
 
   #3  

Diamondpilot

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Big issue is the truck is not used enough. Not good on diesels. Drive it like you stole it to blow the crap out of the carboned up turbos. Keep fresh fuel in it and tow heavy often and it will be happy.

Chris
 
   #4  

roadhunter

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Ahh another 6.0 diesel problem that makes no sense. I feel for folks who have been burned by this engine, and there are plenty. We have 2 where I work and both have been absolute disasters, dozens to trips to the shop in the first 100k along with thousands of dollars in repairs. Now one of our supers bought a f550 with a 6.4 and from what I can read that motor has many problems as well. Just waiting for the call to take that one to the shop.
 
   #6  

dodge man

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They have a variable vane turbo that can carbon up, but that's not going to happen sitting. It has been speculated that driving them and not working them hard makes this happen. Problem with a 6.0 is you work it to hard it will lift the head and blow the head gasket, but this usually happens on truck that have been modified.
 
   #7  

jaotguy

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the vanes and linkages rust up and stop working properly ... leaving the vanes in the closed position ( full turbo ) ... sensors then sense this and reduce the timing and fuel.... and cause limp mode ....

or get stuck in the open position and you have reduced power ( little turbo action )

they also like to blow o-rings on the turbo oil lines ....

earlier 6.0 had a poorly designed fuel advance driven off the engine oil pressure ...
if the engine pressure dropped, the truck quit running and would not start till it cooled off enough to thicken the oil again ...
the original thought was with a cold engine , the pressure was higher and it increased the fueling for cold running ... tapering back when the motor warmed up and oil pressure dropped ... reducing the amount of fuel injected ...
but if the oil got too thin , the system failed.... leaving the driver stuck in traffic or worse....
 
   #8  

Jimbrown

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Well I got a 06 60 and it has never had a wrench turned on it except for oil and filters. I have a friend with 05 and his is the same. But, neither of us fix things that ain't broke. I am gonna bet this is what happened. the guy doing the service pried the airfilter off without taking the turbo inlet hose assemply off. In the process this puts strain on the MAP sensor and the plug that goes to it. I bet the MAP connector has bent pins that aren't matching up to the sensor assembly.
 
   #9  

Diamondpilot

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Well I got a 06 60 and it has never had a wrench turned on it except for oil and filters. I have a friend with 05 and his is the same. But, neither of us fix things that ain't broke. I am gonna bet this is what happened. the guy doing the service pried the airfilter off without taking the turbo inlet hose assemply off. In the process this puts strain on the MAP sensor and the plug that goes to it. I bet the MAP connector has bent pins that aren't matching up to the sensor assembly.

I'm with you. 200,000 combined on my 04 and current 06 F350 and only one issue, a bad dash cluster. Runs like a scalded dog.

Chris
 
   #10  

FTG-05

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They have a variable vane turbo that can carbon up, but that's not going to happen sitting. It has been speculated that driving them and not working them hard makes this happen. Problem with a 6.0 is you work it to hard it will lift the head and blow the head gasket, but this usually happens on truck that have been modified.

No it doesn't.

It happens due to the interactions of a crappy EGR design, poor coolant choice, poor head bolt choice and poor cooling design.

To whit:

Ford designed the EGR coolant flow to go through the liquid/liquid oil cooler first, then to the EGR to cool incoming exhaust gases. The coolant side of the oil cooler has very small coolant passages that is prone to being plugged up. When this happens, coolant no longer flows through the oil or EGR cooler and the EGR cooler starts overheating and eventually fails, leaking coolant into the cylinders. Enough coolant leaks and you can then lift the heads leading to a headgasket failure.

So in addition to this poor EGR cooler design, Ford also uses their universal Gold coolant in the 6.0. This is a good coolant except not for diesel engines with EGR coolers since the Gold coolant has silicates in it. These silicates under high temps, precipitate out and, you guessed it, plug up the small oil cooler coolant passages. Now couple this with the fact that Ford designed the 6.0 heads with bolts (180ksi yield) instead of studs (220ksi yield) and you have a recipe for disaster.

Simple fixes for the above:

- Install a coolant filter - stat!
- Replace the Ford Gold coolant with CAT EC-1 spec'd ELC (or Ultra ELC) coolant. CAT EC-1 coolants have no silicates that will precipitate out under high temps.
- Install an aftermarket gauge that will allow you monitor coolant vs oil fluid temps. +15 degrees difference means you have a plugged oil cooler and an impending EGR cooler failure. Example is a Scangauge II that will monitor ECT and EOT.

Upgrades include installing an EGR delete kit and replacing the head bolts with studs (plus alternator and battery cable upgrades).

Once you do the above, the 6.0 is pretty bulletproof.

Those who say to "drive it like you stole it" are exactly right. These trucks need to be worked, not pansied around getting groceries.

Hope this helps.
 
 
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