Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2

   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #1,684  

NoTrespassing

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East Central Illinois
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Kubota 1999 L3710 HST FWA
Here, we’ll make it easy for everyone…
Over $3 in 2007.
Over $4 in 2008.
Over $3.90 in 2011.
Over $3.90 in 2012.
Over $3.70 in 2013.
Over $3.70 in 2014.
Stayed under $3 for the next 7 years.
Dropped below $2 in April 2020 at the start of the pandemic, when supply and demand went nuts. Nothing’s been the same since. Will take years for things to sift out. Everything will eventually settle, but nothing, nothing, will ever come back to the same prices. I am still surprised at the low cost of gasoline over my lifetime compared to the rest of the world.

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"Everything will eventually settle, but nothing, nothing, will ever come back to the same prices."

Oil is down to 93$ If a recession happens, prices will drop. I think we'll see a national average gas price around $3.00 before summer 2023.
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #1,685  

MossRoad

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South Bend, Indiana (near)
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Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
"Everything will eventually settle, but nothing, nothing, will ever come back to the same prices."

Oil is down to 93$ If a recession happens, prices will drop. I think we'll see a national average gas price around $3.00 before summer 2023.
I’m happy with it a $1.85. 🙃
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #1,686  

Oaktree

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Coös, N.H.
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Kioti LK3054xs
Nuclear is a great option for the PNW because we have massive hydro capacity on the Columbia that can be shut down during low demand periods. Starting or stopping a turbine is as easy as turning a valve, while the nuke needs to run full out 24/7.
How long before there's pressure to remove some of those hydro dams if/when nukes provide most of the electricity? Read somewhere recently that there's a movement to remove some of the dams on the Snake river in Washington to try to bring the salmon population back.
My 1959 Rambler has a much better AM than my BMW or Toyota... so does my 80's Chevrolet Truck...
Many/most of those old school AM-only car radios were very good...they had to be, back then that's where the listening was, but there were a lot fewer stations than there are today, so you often needed to listen to something non-local. GM factory radios were quite good on AM even into the 90s.
Aftermarket car stereos were a different story, even back in the 70s AM was clearly an afterthought on most of them.
Me thinks the AM broadcasters don't know no one listens and this includes the sports broadcasts...
Not sure what you're saying. Radio stations subscribe to ratings (Nielsen, just like tv), and the data can be sorted by demographic group and zipcode. They know who's listening, when and where (well, not individuals but demographics).
Most AM listenership is men in the 65-to-death age group, the one exception being sports talk which trends a bit younger.
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #1,687  

NoTrespassing

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Joined
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East Central Illinois
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Kubota 1999 L3710 HST FWA
How long before there's pressure to remove some of those hydro dams if/when nukes provide most of the electricity? Read somewhere recently that there's a movement to remove some of the dams on the Snake river in Washington to try to bring the salmon population back.

Many/most of those old school AM-only car radios were very good...they had to be, back then that's where the listening was, but there were a lot fewer stations than there are today, so you often needed to listen to something non-local. GM factory radios were quite good on AM even into the 90s.
Aftermarket car stereos were a different story, even back in the 70s AM was clearly an afterthought on most of them.

Not sure what you're saying. Radio stations subscribe to ratings (Nielsen, just like tv), and the data can be sorted by demographic group and zipcode. They know who's listening, when and where (well, not individuals but demographics).
Most AM listenership is men in the 65-to-death age group, the one exception being sports talk which trends a bit younger.
Count me as the odd man out then, I've been an AM listener all my life starting with transistor radios in about 1970. WLS came in loud and clear to central Illinois. I did listen to some FM in my 20s but honestly I can't listen to the same songs over and over and most newer music didn't interest me. I even used to listen to Art Bell Coast to Coast AM overnights. AM has pretty much been on the radio every work day for the past 38 years too.
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #1,688  

Doughknob

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Oct 26, 2013
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ohio
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Deere X500, Bobcat CT4045
....I am still surprised at the low cost of gasoline over my lifetime compared to the rest of the world.
Govt subsidized fuel was great! Now that big-oil has to make it on their own, they must raise prices in the US also.
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #1,689  

NoTrespassing

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East Central Illinois
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Kubota 1999 L3710 HST FWA
Govt subsidized fuel was great! Now that big-oil has to make it on their own, they must raise prices in the US also.
The chart below was published by the CBO in 2012.


So I guess we can agree that if oil/gas/diesel prices drop it's not because of government subsidies? As you say, "big-oil has to make it on their own".
 

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