Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2

   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,081  

Larry Caldwell

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I agree. Nobody breaks the 2nd law of thermodynamics - you can't get as much out as you put in. The only way hydrogen would be a viable fuel is if we had unlimited cheap energy to put into it. Blowing steam over burning coal won't do it.
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,082  

RoyJackson

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I agree. Nobody breaks the 2nd law of thermodynamics - you can't get as much out as you put in. The only way hydrogen would be a viable fuel is if we had unlimited cheap energy to put into it. Blowing steam over burning coal won't do it.
Personally, I think hydrogen is a viable fuel once storage methods are developed. As you or another TBNer wrote, hydrogen doesn't have the BTU's other fuels have, so there will be limitations.
However, hydrogen is the most prevalent element in the universe...there's no running out of hydrogen
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,084  

Doughknob

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OK, thanks. I had a 2015 wrx with the 2.0L engine and I got just over 30mpg. That’s y wondering….
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,086  

Egon

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Hydrogen seems to be able to handle the heavy haulers. Battery mode will take care of light duty local needs.

The off shore wind farms offer an acceptable approach to hydrogen. These seem to be at the hands of private companies.

Keep in mind technological advances are always happening!
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,087  

MossRoad

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I agree. Nobody breaks the 2nd law of thermodynamics - you can't get as much out as you put in. The only way hydrogen would be a viable fuel is if we had unlimited cheap energy to put into it. Blowing steam over burning coal won't do it.
That reminded me of when we took one of our kids to a visit to Purdue while selecting colleges. We spent a couple hours with seniors doing a Q&A session about things they learned at Purdue. I specifically remember one engineering student being asked if they had anything they could do over, what would it be. Answer:

”I wouldn’t have taken thermodynamics my freshman year.”
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,088  

Larry Caldwell

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Hydrogen seems to be able to handle the heavy haulers. Battery mode will take care of light duty local needs.

The off shore wind farms offer an acceptable approach to hydrogen. These seem to be at the hands of private companies.

Keep in mind technological advances are always happening!
If you scale up wind production by several orders of magnitude. Right now we are already short on power, and we are faced with decommissioning all those old coal burning plants and nuclear power plants that are no longer repairable. It's not the consumption end of hydrogen that is the problem, it's the production end.
 
   / Battery based vehicles of today and tomorrow pt 2 #2,089  

Doughknob

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Personally, I think hydrogen is a viable fuel once storage methods are developed. As you or another TBNer wrote, hydrogen doesn't have the BTU's other fuels have, so there will be limitations.
However, hydrogen is the most prevalent element in the universe...there's no running out of hydrogen
Yes, true it is most plentiful. But it takes too much energy to densify it where it is economically feasible to transport in small quantities like cars.

When we find a way to crack water efficiently, then we will have made hydrogen progress!
 
 
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