Best oven type: Gas, electric or induction?

   #1  

CobyRupert

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Wife wants the old 30+ year old electric range to go. ...I don't agree..... I say: "So what if the burner indication dial doesn't spin when you turn it? It still works. You can tell if it's hot-medium-or-low by how far you turned it, right?" Plus you can buy a new handle. Now I think she's just sabotaging it: She got rid of all the old crusty burner pans and replaced them with new ones that aren't notched correctly, so every burner is tilted. This makes it really hard for me to perfectly fry my bacon! Definitely sabotage. Sure, I could track down properly fitting ones too..

...but I probably won't win this (choose yer battles)...so...
..both of us don't like electric stoves, we could get gas (rural propane) , but would have to get an account, a tank, install the line/regulator (who does that? Owner or gas company?). We're thinking going induction. What's everybody's preference?
Any good/bad tips or experiences on induction?
 
   #2  

k0ua

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Wife wants the old 30+ year old electric range to go. ...I don't agree..... I say: "So what if the burner indication dial doesn't spin when you turn it? It still works. You can tell if it's hot-medium-or-low by how far you turned it, right?" Plus you can buy a new handle. Now I think she's just sabotaging it: She got rid of all the old crusty burner pans and replaced them with ones that aren't notched correctly, so every burner is tilted. This makes it really hard for me to perfectly fry my bacon! Definitely sabotage.

...so...
..both of us don't like electric stoves, we could get gas (rural propane) , but would have to get an account, a tank, install the line/regulator (who does that? Owner or gas company?). We're thinking going induction. What's everybody's preference?
Any good/bad tips or experiences on induction?

We have both electric and gas. Electric upstairs in the main Kitchen, and gas in the small kitchen downstairs. There is plus and minus to both. I think most real chef's would prefer gas due to the better heat control. A gas oven makes more of a moist heat, which can be good or bad depending on what you are baking in it. An electric is convenient, and maybe safer without an open flame. I have never had an induction.
 
   #3  

Sawyer Rob

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My take on it is, chef's LOVE gas for the stove top, (fast, easier to adjust heat) BUT want electric for the oven... (more even baking)

SR
 
   #4  

4570Man

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My take on it is, chef's LOVE gas for the stove top, (fast, easier to adjust heat) BUT want electric for the oven... (more even baking) SR
Agree 100 percent. Another plus is a gas stove works in a power outage. I have a gas stove and an electric convection oven. I wish I had a gas water heater.
 
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   #6  

PILOON

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We have used gas, electric and convection!

The ideal is probably induction for the top and convection for the oven.

Our convection is a counter top unit that uses 110vac and beats gas and regular hands down.
Based on 110vac and fact that it cooks 1/2 regular time of 220 ovens it is very economical.
Baking on all levels is even due to convection.

For top gas is sure fast but today induction seems to be same or maybe better except it needs steel pots and pans.
 
   #7  

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We have induction. Better than gas. Except requires magnetic pots and pans. (Pretty common now adays) Glass top, easy to clean, instant heat change, top stays relatively cool. When I boil water for the wife's pot of tea, the whistling kettle stops whistling the same for shutting off with pot in place or lifting kettle off the burner. Great control. Also, high heat input density with induction than gas. No hot handles from hot gases going up the side of pots.
Downside, won't heat your kitchen in a power outage
 
   #8  

ruffdog

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With induction, are there warnings about watches and rings?

We have a electric glass top and it is slow to react to temp changes. The gas at the other house was better. The electric oven is good though.
 
   #9  

Sawyer Rob

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I wouldn't even consider a stove top that I can't use my All American canners on... NO way no how...

My stove is gas, I also have a wood fired cook stove...

SR
 

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I have had an induction cooktop for about 12 years now. Also a double wall unit convection oven. I like them both. My Kenmore Elite just gave up the ghost about 6 months ago. We replaced it with a Bosch. I use mostly cast iron pans. I love the way they cook. And I have a soft spot for the old American cast iron. I also have some new pans and pressure cookers. When I build my new place, I would like to have another induction cooktop but I may have to fight my wife over it....she wants a Schmanttzy "restaurant quality" gas unit. Since she cooks about 5 times as much as I do, and there is a nice meal at the table almost every night, I will probably do what she wants.
 

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So how well does the stainless steel pots work on the induction stovetop.?
 

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So how well does the stainless steel pots work on the induction stovetop.?

Some stainless is designed to work with induction. It is either magnetic stainless (yes, some grades of stainless are magnetic) or has a composite base. If you already have stainless cookware it's likely it won't work well.

We have induction and it is great once you get used to it. It heats very quickly and you can adjust the level instantly. The ability to control the heat input and the evenness of heating can't be matched by any other system.
 

dstig1

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As noted - gas cooktop, electric oven. That is what you find at the high end. You can get a range that is a "dual fuel" type that does just this. Of course you need to pull serious 220V electric and a gas line to it... We have separate units so the gas cooktop uses just the gas line (and a 110V line for the piezo igniters - don't forget you might need that), and the dual oven has a 40 or 50A 220V dedicated circuit feeding it. I forget which it was, but I think I pulled 6ga Cu for it to allow for 50A and lower voltage drop, so I probably ran a 50A breaker.
 

TomSeller

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On the cooktop I have had a GE induction unit for six years and will never have anything but induction from this point on. Faster and more accurate than gas and much easier to clean up. I am an old school (100 year old vintage Griswold and Wagner) cast iron nut and that cookware works great on induction. I also have induction rated All Clad and Sur La Table stainless sets. Also Cuisinart and Lodge enameled Dutch oven and casserole pans. All work great on induction.

If magnets stick solid to the bottom of your cookware, they will work with an induction cooktop.

On the oven, I have a double Kitchen Aid electric oven. Love it.

When I found out years ago that induction would work well with my vintage cast iron collection, I was excited. But once I cooked with induction, I was even more pleased.
 
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joefromga

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With induction, are there warnings about watches and rings?

We have a electric glass top and it is slow to react to temp changes. The gas at the other house was better. The electric oven is good though.
Induction units won't heat small items. They are smart in their design and aren't just on/off.

I needed to test an induction unit one time in a rental and had nothing like a pot to test it with. I tried pliers, hammers, crow bars, and everything else in my tool box. I eventually found something in the garage that had enough magnetic area to trigger the coils.

I love induction. Gas heat is fine in a commercial kitchen but it's basically a fireplace and will cook your whole kitchen. Induction is ultra fast and accurate. Rice? Boil then set timer to 20 minutes on low. Walk away, go do something else etc. Gas will just burn your house down. It also has some leaking dangers to it although it's pretty safe these days.

Induction is the future! It makes the pot bottom hot. Not everything else. They even make induction scoop shaped tops for wok cooking.

uploadfromtaptalk1453880514102.jpg

This is real. I've done it myself.
 

robstaples

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So how well does the stainless steel pots work on the induction stovetop.?

Lots of the current stainless steel cookware is laminated. They use to put a disk of copper or aluminum surrounded by ss for uniform heat conduction. Now they use a magnetic alloy that conducts heat better than just ss.
 

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We used to have infrared cooktop but the glass broke after about 10 years of use. It was replaced by induction and we love it. Have it over a year and it still looks like new. Since it heats the pot its surface doesn't get too hot so spilled food doesn't bake to it. It is easy to wipe. We had to get all pots and pans new. We used to have gas in one of our previous houses the burners were all dirty and hard to keep clean after few years of use.
 

k0ua

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Lots of the current stainless steel cookware is laminated. They use to put a disk of copper or aluminum surrounded by ss for uniform heat conduction. Now they use a magnetic alloy that conducts heat better than just ss.

On the cooktop I have had a GE induction unit for six years and will never have anything but induction from this point on. Faster and more accurate than gas and much easier to clean up. I am an old school (100 year old vintage Griswold and Wagner) cast iron nut and that cookware works great on induction. I also have induction rated All Clad and Sur La Table stainless sets. Also Cuisinart and Lodge enameled Dutch oven and casserole pans. All work great on induction.

If magnets stick solid to the bottom of your cookware, they will work with an induction cooktop.

On the oven, I have a double Kitchen Aid electric oven. Love it.

When I found out years ago that induction would work well with my vintage cast iron collection, I was excited. But once I cooked with induction, I was even more pleased.

Some stainless is designed to work with induction. It is either magnetic stainless (yes, some grades of stainless are magnetic) or has a composite base. If you already have stainless cookware it's likely it won't work well.

We have induction and it is great once you get used to it. It heats very quickly and you can adjust the level instantly. The ability to control the heat input and the evenness of heating can't be matched by any other system.

Thanks for the input on the induction cooktops guys.
 

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I prefer gas over all others, but in our last house and the current one, it wasn't a good option.

The last house we had an electric glass-top stove (not induction) and I hated it. Too wimpy. I would rather have been cooking on the propane grill outdoors. It took forever to heat up pots and pans and was either too hot or too cold.

We begrudgingly got another electric glass-top stove (again not induction) in our new house, and I couldn't be more impressed. It's a GE Cafe model, marketed as their "pro" cooktop/stove line. I guess it just puts out higher wattage or something. The gal at the supply house raved about it, and she was right. So I have a new appreciation for the glass-top stoves. This one even has a cast iron griddle that sits over the top of two burners, and it fries the best pancakes of my life.
 

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we have induction, real nice. Faster than a microwave. Down side is all your pots/pans must be magnetic
 

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As a safety note on induction. It heats the pan really fast. When I first got it we would time it to see how fast we could boil water. One pot brought cool tap water to a rolling boil in just over 2 minutes. That was a steel pot. I still have a steel kettle and will put it on high right away for coffee in the morning. But you do not want to do that with cast iron ( that includes enamel coated cast iron). I put those on medium. If you put it on high you risk thermal shock. You can warp or break the pan. Just like if you overheat cast iron on any other heat source. The difference is that the pan heats up so fast it can fail dramatically. I put an empty frying pan on the stove and absentmindedly hit pulse and started talking to my son. Soon thereafter there was a very loud noise and the pan exploded. Blew into 3 major pie shaped pieces. Scared the heck out of us and ruined a pan that dated to just before the depression.
 

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I think the primary disadvantage of gas ovens is that water vapor is a by-product of combustion. Would be great for roasting (I cook turkeys only on the gas grill), probably takes a little patience for baking. I'm not an expert so correct me if I'm wrong. In our new house we have electric oven and gas cook-top. Took some time to get used to gas but I love the control (other than our unit requires "simmer plates"...hard to regulate heat down).
 

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we have induction, real nice. Faster than a microwave. Down side is all your pots/pans must be magnetic
And, that leaves out my pressure canners!

I grow and can my own food and LOVE my canners, so....

SR
 

4570Man

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And, that leaves out my pressure canners!

I grow and can my own food and LOVE my canners, so....

SR

What would happen if you put a piece of steel under the canners?
 

polo1665

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And, that leaves out my pressure canners!

I grow and can my own food and LOVE my canners, so....

SR

I can see where induction would work well, but I'm with you. I have too many different pots and pans that I like to use, so for me it's a gas cook top all the way. I do prefer convection oven for indoor cooking, and run a wood fired bake oven for outdoor cooking.
 

polo1665

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What would happen if you put a piece of steel under the canners?

You would lose that quick response time that the induction cook top users like so much.
 

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I think the primary disadvantage of gas ovens is that water vapor is a by-product of combustion. Would be great for roasting (I cook turkeys only on the gas grill), probably takes a little patience for baking. I'm not an expert so correct me if I'm wrong. In our new house we have electric oven and gas cook-top. Took some time to get used to gas but I love the control (other than our unit requires "simmer plates"...hard to regulate heat down).

In the past, when we had gas appliances, I never noticed any specific impact of the water vapor. As noted above, we have an induction range which gives you all the advantages of gas and electric at the same time, and more. For an oven we have a double oven with a convection microwave and an electric steam oven. I'm no cooking expert, but the steam oven let's you customize the moisture while baking/roasting and it actually does work (when you know as much as my wife does about cooking.)
 

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In the past, when we had gas appliances, I never noticed any specific impact of the water vapor. As noted above, we have an induction range which gives you all the advantages of gas and electric at the same time, and more. For an oven we have a double oven with a convection microwave and an electric steam oven. I'm no cooking expert, but the steam oven let's you customize the moisture while baking/roasting and it actually does work (when you know as much as my wife does about cooking.)

Steam is essential to bread baking. If I ever buy another oven it will have steam injection. When I bake in my wood fired oven I use a small steam generator with a hose hooked to the door.
 

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They make canners that work with induction cook tops.

They also have induction adapter plates for the purpose of using older pots. It does lose the benefits but still works.

I'm surprised everyone on this site complaining about modern stuff aren't all still using 8n tractors. Or steam tractors.
 

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Baking cookies and pies and cakes takes place in our convection oven. Great results. If I'm making bread I do it in a wood fired pizza oven. No moisture issues. And cooking any kind of meat or soup produces outstanding results.
 

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They make canners that work with induction cook tops.

They also have induction adapter plates for the purpose of using older pots. It does lose the benefits but still works.

I'm surprised everyone on this site complaining about modern stuff aren't all still using 8n tractors. Or steam tractors.

SO, just because they make something more hi-teck than I already own, I should sell or throw away what "I" already have, just to buy something new?? :confused2:

Heck, if I had some cows to chase, I'd have kept the 8n I use to have... As for steam, I still like that, it's what makes my canners work! ha ha ha

SR
 

joefromga

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No, when you upgrade to a new technology there are other upgrades that go along with it. You don't have to do anything. But if you want the best and newest tech then you gotta get with the program.

If your canner is aluminum you could get 8 bucks from the recycler for it.
 

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No If your canner is aluminum you could get 8 bucks from the recycler for it.

I guess I'll pass on the "yuppie" thinking and keep the cook stove that I have...

And, seeing as scrap prices are down right now, so I guess I'll keep the canners I have too... lol

SR
 

teejk

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In the past, when we had gas appliances, I never noticed any specific impact of the water vapor. As noted above, we have an induction range which gives you all the advantages of gas and electric at the same time, and more. For an oven we have a double oven with a convection microwave and an electric steam oven. I'm no cooking expert, but the steam oven let's you customize the moisture while baking/roasting and it actually does work (when you know as much as my wife does about cooking.)
Don't get me wrong! My grandma had a gas oven and everything came out perfect (but that might just be because it was grandma). I think modern ovens are "tight" so any needed moisture for baking is already present in electric ovens if you don't open the door. Same thing for gas ovens...probably too tight to maintain proper humidity. I'm sure they work but one might need to ignore the package cooking times. As an aside most "pros" suggest using toothpicks to check for "doneness" on baked goods. My mom used to use straws from her broom! Thinking back it would probably send a lot of people into fits but somehow I survived.
 

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Electric convection oven and induction cooktop for use in our home. We had a gas range and oven in the last house we were at. I would rather have our setup 7 days a week, twice on Sundays. There is no substitute for the immediate temperature control of induction, simply unparalleled.
 

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As a safety note on induction. It heats the pan really fast. When I first got it we would time it to see how fast we could boil water. One pot brought cool tap water to a rolling boil in just over 2 minutes. That was a steel pot. I still have a steel kettle and will put it on high right away for coffee in the morning. But you do not want to do that with cast iron ( that includes enamel coated cast iron). I put those on medium. If you put it on high you risk thermal shock. You can warp or break the pan. Just like if you overheat cast iron on any other heat source. The difference is that the pan heats up so fast it can fail dramatically. I put an empty frying pan on the stove and absentmindedly hit pulse and started talking to my son. Soon thereafter there was a very loud noise and the pan exploded. Blew into 3 major pie shaped pieces. Scared the heck out of us and ruined a pan that dated to just before the depression.

You are correct. I've always babied my 100 year cast iron anyway. Too much invested in cleaning and curing the 30 or so pieces I guess. About the time I first bought induction I changed the way I cook a little. The FIRST thing I now do when cooking with cast iron is to put the skillet or oven on the induction top and turn it on to "1" (low). That starts warming up the cast iron but not enough to get it to smoke. I THEN start to gather my ingredients, etc. Shortly before using the cast iron I switch it to half the setting I will use. Then 20 or so seconds later I move it to the setting I want and will cook with. Seldom over 50%. Sounds complicated but it is not, it is just like warming up an engine.

With my stainless, I don't worry. If I need to boil water for my morning coffee, dog-gone-it, I need it now. Straight to 90%.

Having said all that, I don't know that I would change my cooktop just for induction. If you have pots and pans that are not induction rated, it may not be worth it. I was lucky in that I had a kitchen full of cast iron when my 30 year old standard cooktop died. So the decision was simple and I have no regrets.
 

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You are correct. I've always babied my 100 year cast iron anyway. Too much invested in cleaning and curing the 30 or so pieces I guess. About the time I first bought induction I changed the way I cook a little. The FIRST thing I now do when cooking with cast iron is to put the skillet or oven on the induction top and turn it on to "1" (low). That starts warming up the cast iron but not enough to get it to smoke. I THEN start to gather my ingredients, etc. Shortly before using the cast iron I switch it to half the setting I will use. Then 20 or so seconds later I move it to the setting I want and will cook with. Seldom over 50%. Sounds complicated but it is not, it is just like warming up an engine. With my stainless, I don't worry. If I need to boil water for my morning coffee, dog-gone-it, I need it now. Straight to 90%. Having said all that, I don't know that I would change my cooktop just for induction. If you have pots and pans that are not induction rated, it may not be worth it. I was lucky in that I had a kitchen full of cast iron when my 30 year old standard cooktop died. So the decision was simple and I have no regrets.
How do you store 30 pieces? I have maybe half that many pots and pans and my cabinet is jammed.
 

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How do you store 30 pieces? I have maybe half that many pots and pans and my cabinet is jammed.

One nice thing about Griswold cast iron is that they stack or "nest" inside each other. Same for Dutch ovens. Griddles are flat and stack nicely. Casserole pans stack inside each other as well. If enamel, they need some sort of fusion since enamel is glass. Lids are a bit of a challenge.
 
 
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