Best way to remove all methanol from tires.

   #31  

oosik

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Sorry - I did not intend to upset anybody. Just some of my experiences. Generally speaking - increased weight will improve traction. To get improved roll over protection - spread out the rear wheels.

And you are spot on about my Kubota Op Manual on weight. They basically say - be sure to add enough weight on the 3-point or rear tires to offset whatever will be lifted with the FEL. End of recommendation .......
 
   #32  

Have tractor will travel

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Following up on TractorGuy's comment - I use two concrete lintels, both 5 foot, laid across the box blade. I'm not able to lift either of them, but can lift one end of each of them. So let's say they each weigh 160 lbs., 320 lbs combined.
For my aerator, I use 8 concrete blocks at 40 lbs each, so 320 lbs
Those implements are used with one of my Kubota's
The Ingersoll has RimGuard. It's attachments are not so heavy, nor strong enough to carry a lintel
 
  
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#33  
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ljjhouser

ljjhouser

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That's ok. You didn't. I probably over reacted anyway. Thanks for the post. Best Wishes.
 
  
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ljjhouser

ljjhouser

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Have Tractor Will Travel - when I saw you post, I had to scratch my head for a while. It has been a long time since I built with concrete blocks. I had forgotten. That is a good suggestion. I have tried 8x8x16 blocks, but they only weigh 32 pounds and I could only secure 6. About 190 pounds. But you may be right, a lintel might be heavier and easier to secure. The blocks are still too light. Home Depot listed one, but only 2" @4' very light. there must be a place around here to get one. I will check it out. Thank You.
 

mo1

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Reading this thread, the OP clearly is overloading the front axle and will destroy it if he continues to use too little ballast. He should read the owner's manual to see their ballast recommendations and follow it. I suspect it will call for a lot more 3 point ballast than a 400 pound box blade even with 75% fill in the tires. The OP probably will have to fill the tires to 75% with something, either topping up the methanol/water or replacing it with beet juice and then adding wheel weights and/or having a lot more weight on the 3 point hitch. He could either get a much heavier box blade, add extra weight (iron, solid concrete blocks, etc.) or some combination of the two. Without knowing the exact ballast recommendations, it will be hard to say exactly what he should do.

The discussion about 40% liquid fills relates to radial tires on row crop tractors where ride quality while roading >20 MPH and power hop are major concerns. Those are not going to be concerns with a tractor that has a top speed of less than 16 MPH and the main concern here is using a loader instead of a giant no-till drill or ripper or some other high draft load pulled at high speed.

I also live in the general region the OP does and bought my tractor here. My rear tires came filled to 75% with water/methanol and this is essentially standard for any ag tractor. It used to be calcium chloride and water but that has been moved away from due to the corrosiveness of the calcium chloride. The commentary about beet juice locally is that it's a pain in the behind as it makes servicing tires extremely difficult due to the sticky mess it creates, and it's expensive stuff, so few ag tractors run it. There is little row cropping done here, cattle ranching is the main agricultural pursuit, so ballasting tractors properly for handling large round and square bales is much more important here than mitigating power hop. Shoot, power hop isn't even possible on many tractors here as that only occurs with driven front wheels. You don't need MFWD to run hay equipment or feed bales, so there are a lot of 2WD tractors around here.
 

jyoutz

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I was thinking the same way. But I think it is highly flammable. I know water is added when putting it in, I just don't know how much water is usually added. Wonder if you could let it evaporate with no issues.
It’s usually a 50-50 mix with water, so I don’t think it’s flammable.
 

jyoutz

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Reading this thread, the OP clearly is overloading the front axle and will destroy it if he continues to use too little ballast. He should read the owner's manual to see their ballast recommendations and follow it. I suspect it will call for a lot more 3 point ballast than a 400 pound box blade even with 75% fill in the tires. The OP probably will have to fill the tires to 75% with something, either topping up the methanol/water or replacing it with beet juice and then adding wheel weights and/or having a lot more weight on the 3 point hitch. He could either get a much heavier box blade, add extra weight (iron, solid concrete blocks, etc.) or some combination of the two. Without knowing the exact ballast recommendations, it will be hard to say exactly what he should do.

The discussion about 40% liquid fills relates to radial tires on row crop tractors where ride quality while roading >20 MPH and power hop are major concerns. Those are not going to be concerns with a tractor that has a top speed of less than 16 MPH and the main concern here is using a loader instead of a giant no-till drill or ripper or some other high draft load pulled at high speed.

I also live in the general region the OP does and bought my tractor here. My rear tires came filled to 75% with water/methanol and this is essentially standard for any ag tractor. It used to be calcium chloride and water but that has been moved away from due to the corrosiveness of the calcium chloride. The commentary about beet juice locally is that it's a pain in the behind as it makes servicing tires extremely difficult due to the sticky mess it creates, and it's expensive stuff, so few ag tractors run it. There is little row cropping done here, cattle ranching is the main agricultural pursuit, so ballasting tractors properly for handling large round and square bales is much more important here than mitigating power hop. Shoot, power hop isn't even possible on many tractors here as that only occurs with driven front wheels. You don't need MFWD to run hay equipment or feed bales, so there are a lot of 2WD tractors around here.
Could beet juice be added to tubes, thereby eliminating the sticky mess issues?
 

mo1

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Could beet juice be added to tubes, thereby eliminating the sticky mess issues?

You can add ballast to tubed tires. It would add quite a bit of extra work to install a tube in a tubeless tire as most tractor tires today are tubeless. Also any leaks in the tube will result in the ballast getting inside of the tire and rim, just somewhat less of it compared to no tube.
 

jyoutz

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You can add ballast to tubed tires. It would add quite a bit of extra work to install a tube in a tubeless tire as most tractor tires today are tubeless. Also any leaks in the tube will result in the ballast getting inside of the tire and rim, just somewhat less of it compared to no tube.
I tubed the front tires on my tubeless tires because they had too many leaks, but of course the front tires don’t have ballast
 
 
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