Bucket Forks

   #1  

TWINKLE_TOES

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Looking for advice on loader forks for my B21 (TL421 Loader). I looked at quite a few but not having any experience thought maybe I should ask. My use is lifting Pallets, irregular objects (stumps) and big ole rolls of black berries that I can't seem to get in the bucket.
 
   #2  

scruffy

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Twinkle Toes, The following is a cut and paste of a response made by Harv down on the Rural/culvert project initially posted by Harv:
About the bucket forks --

Do you like them?

I love them to pieces. Handiest bang for the buck so far.

Have you tried them to lift and carry brush?

A little, and they worked great. I'll be doing a lot more of that pretty soon.

How long to get on and off?

Less than a minute for both forks. (See attachment)

Where did you get them?

I just told my tractor broker ('Miracle Mike') I wanted them and they arrived with the tractor. They're Gearmore forks, so they should be pretty easy to come by.

How much?

I paid $350 through Miracle Mike. Brand new.

I got the smallest of the four available sizes. They weigh 90 lbs. apiece (one reason for getting the small ones), but the built-in handles make them quite easy to handle. They are 2 x 3 x 32 inches and have a lift capacity of 1,000 pounds (more than my loader).

I did connect with the bucket rake manufacturer, as I mentioned in a previous post, but when neither Miracle Mike nor 2 tractor dealers I talked to had never seen or heard of them, I got cold feet. The $600 price tag didn't help any, either.

Fact is, I really I wish I had the bucket rake for my trail blazing adventure the next couple of days, but I'm gonna just get familiar with what I do have and keep the rake in the back of my mind.

Feel free to get one and let me know what you think.


ONCE AGAIN, that was posted by Harv.
 
  
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TWINKLE_TOES

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Thanks Scruffy,(and Harv)
Sounds like Harv is a happy forker. I never looked at Gearmore, I will check them out. I did see the $600 price tag on a lot of brands.
 
   #4  

scruffy

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Twinkle Toes, you should probably scroll down and take a look at the string, at least to get the proper context of Harv's post. He appears to like his bucket forks very much.
Can't say I blame him, I can think of a few times (more than a few) that they would have been very handy to have around!
 
   #5  

Tinmann

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San Juan Islands
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3710 HST
I bought a set for my 3710 but I am sure they would basically be the same. Mine do not connect to the front loader, instead I disconnect the loader by way of a quick disconnect and can have the forks and all on in about 3-4 minutes. The dealer told me this was a better setup because the weight of the loader is off the tractor thereby being able to lift even more. For my setup it was about $1200 for the total package, disconnect, a set of 42 inch forks along with the rear mounting plate. I couldn't get along without them. They are on an equal with the front loader as far as being used and being handy to lift things. I use them to move trees, stumps and brush to the burn piles. I would buy them again in a second!!! Highly recommended!
 
   #6  

TomG

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If you're lifting pallets, then you probably want forks that have adjustable widths. For safety, you also want a backrest, or carriage, that is as tall as the loads worked. It's not good to risk a load falling off the back of the forks during a high lift. Note that with loader type forks, the load is over the tractor when it's raised high. I think these features eliminate many of the simpler bucket add-on type forks. I believe that some bucket replacement units have these features, but they also are a bit pricey.

I ended up with 3ph pallet forks myself. The true vertical lift and carriage tilt is good, and the load is carried on the back wheels (where it belongs). In addition, I always have a steel carriage frame as well as the ROPS bar between the load and me. However, I got 3ph forks mainly because I wanted to use the loader bucket and forks at the same time, and the price of the 3ph forks wasn't much more than a loader type with the features I wanted. The 3ph forks also have a side-shift option, which I didn't get, and I'm not sure loader type forks have such an option.
 
   #7  

bsauter

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central Indiana
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I just got some forks at my Kubota dealer last week. They are from AgriTek (made in Michigan) and cost me $375. I needed them quickly to help move a huge brush pile that I didn't relish loading on a trailer by hand. Work great. Two seperate units that attach to the bucket with chain binders. Takes about a minute to do. Very secure. Don't know if I really like the binders, I've always considered them a pain but seem to work well.

Brad, Kubota L3010HST, loader, R4 tires
Pictures at http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumIndex?u=179207&a=9183978
 
   #8  

TomG

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Yep, I couldn't get along without my 3ph forks either. They end up on the 3ph more often than not. I can plan other projects and know when I need a particular 3ph implement, but I never know when I need to lift something heavy and bulky. Of course, pretty soon I'll never know when it's going to snow, so I guess the blower will be on most times.

A few days ago, I brought the tractor back from our camp. I loaded a 6' scraper into a pickup bed with a cap on it, and a backhoe onto a utility trailer--each implement was setting loosely on pallets. I took the implements home, returned, drove the tractor home and then unloaded the implements.

There's a bunch of lifting problems that have to be solved for such work. I might have been able to figure out how to do it with bucket and chain, but the idea seems pretty iffy. Real pallet forks, whether a 3ph or a bucket replacement type, are great--especially if you've got to work alone. Without the forks, I think I would have had to put the bite on some neighbours to help muscle the stuff around.
 
   #9  

TomG

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With binders, I usually run a chain loop secured with grab hooks. If the loop needs tightening, I just grab onto the loop in two places with the binder hooks and close it. Then, there's a slack length of chain between the two binder hooks. I like that better than trying to piece the binder directly in the chain loop. Still sort of a pain though.

I've got old style binders, and I have to tie the handles closed to make sure the binders don't pop open in route. I haven't seen the new style binders, but they're probably less of a pain.
 
 
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