Chainsaw touched power line - guy died

   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #2  

Torvy

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Looking to purchase a Compact Tractor in 30-50 HP range.
At least he was in Friendly Fridley when he passed. (People from the area will know the reference...as long as they are 50+)

In all seriousness, I am with you. I am overly cautious with electricity. I'll throw the main breaker when working on wires in the house.
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #3  

Thomas

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Kubota B2650HSD w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046 & Craftman T2200 lawn mower.
:( Thoughts prayers to family.
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #4  

Jstpssng

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It sounds like he was working for a tree service when he did it. Generally it's a good idea to notify the power co when working near wires. They can change a setting so that the breaker will throw after one short, rather than the normal 3.
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #5  

mo1

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It sounds like he was working for a tree service when he did it. Generally it's a good idea to notify the power co when working near wires. They can change a setting so that the breaker will throw after one short, rather than the normal 3.

The issue is that you are dealing with some pretty stiff voltages on those lines, more than high enough to cause significant burns and arc flash even with a very brief exposure before a fuse or cutout blows and de-energizes a line. The absolute lowest voltage you will see on a distribution line is 2400 volts (phase to ground on an older 2400/4160Y system) but generally it is quite a bit higher, typically 7200 volts or more phase to ground and 12,470 volts or more phase to phase. Depending on the voltage of the line/lines, you may not even need to touch the line, simply getting close to it can cause a discharge.
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #6  

RandyT

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As an utility forester, had to respond to a fire under a 230 kva line years ago and discovered the cause of the fire after finding small globs of metal and a knee cap. Guy dropped a tree into the overhead transmission line.
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #7  

Fxfymn413

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Ever notice the warnings that are on every aerial lift? "Do not operate within 10 feet of any electrical line." Unless it was a pole saw they were probably too close.
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #9  

ArlyA

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As a certified sawyer and with 30,000 saw accidents per year in the USA, I run the other direction when someone with no saw training what-so-ever shows up at a job site with their saw. Ya, this statement will crank up some people here. I do like to do sawyer work in the woods, but not haul people to town to reconnect arms, fingers or heads. That just ruins my day. 😁
 
   / Chainsaw touched power line - guy died #10  

Jims1025R

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Ontario, Canada
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During training as a firefighter many decades back, a trainier from the local electric utility gave us a seminar on safety near wires. Included in this was a video, in which many actual deaths were captured (by news crews, I expect) which certainly did not make it to the public. It was terrifying! There is so much to learn about the hazards of power line contact! I recounted this training to those I trained in the fire department. I did a lot of chainsaw training too. Yeah, you have to have a lot of confidence in the common sense of the trainee, 'cause you can't account nor even train for all the stupid things you can do with a chainsaw. I've had to yell "freeze" a few times. And firefighters use chainsaws in places they do not belong - like on roofs for ventilation during house fire attack - often at night. Fortunately, when I have had to use a chainsaw on a roof, I've usually had a ladder truck or aerial platform close by as a support, or at least stop should I slip. After that, regular, and appropriate use of a chainsaw - with feet on the ground - seems much less traumatizing! But never take them for granted, particularly slicing around where you cannot see what's there really well!

All that said, in 28 years on the job, I saw circular saws and lawnmowers as the greater hazards. I don't recall a medical call attending a chainsaw injury, but I have picked fingers and thumbs of three different patients out of the sawdust to accompany them to the hospital, and pieces of hands and feet from lawnmowers and PTO's. At the end of the day, it seems that the hazard is there to be found by the unwitting in many machines - stay one step ahead while operating, and considering the operating environment!
 
 
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