Chimney Repair

   / Chimney Repair #1  

citytransplant

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What would be the best way to repair this chimney and does it pose any danger in its present condition outside of a piece of concrete falling atop someone's head?
 

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   / Chimney Repair #2  

the old grind

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Call your insurance agent if you have one. If not, or also, call your local building inspector. It matters less what we think of what you have, and plenty to either or both of them. If the inside isn't a lot tidier than the outside, the nearest reliable liner installer guys are usually up on local requirements.

Also depends a bit on what vents through the chimney. Solid fuel heaters usually cause bigger temp fluctuations than similar gas or oil devices. Possibility of freezing between heating cycles wants something to minimize moisture absorption in veneers or facings.

A lot of small, post-war homes around here have metal weatherproof housings or shrouds with brick-looking paint jobs. Some were built with metal chimneys from day one, others a refit for sale or for insurance specs. I've seen both types go up in smoke after wood heaters were added to tiny homes built with wall heaters vs larger, more modern forced air units. Flue fires are no fun to stand and watch while fire vols are still on their way.
 
   / Chimney Repair
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citytransplant

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Is the chimney actually used or does it have a stainless steel stovepipe going through the center of it?

Thanks for the reply. There are 2 flues: 1 for oil furnace and 1 for wood stove. I believe the furnace flue is clay (it's the one on the left in the photo) and I'm sure that the wood stove vents through a metal chimney liner, possibly triple-wall (stainless inner wall, aluminized steel center wall, galvanized outer wall per some paperwork the previous homeowner left behind). I think the wood stove metal chimney liner runs through (is threaded inside) a clay flue pipe that is identical in size as its sister to the left.
 
   / Chimney Repair #5  

Redlands Okie

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You could cover the whole thing with lath and stucco type products or with something like Hardiboard siding. With a carefully cut and fitted and sealed lid on top, metal likely to be the easiest for that part. Keep in mind feature maintence such as painting so you can keep that to a minimum. Hardiboard and good paint helps with that. Stucco or EFIS type products are perfect for it.

That thing has some major issues. Bottom line is you need to keep water away from the structure your picture shows. Careful attention should be applied to the top and where it meets the shingles. The pictures are hard to see details but does it have proper step flashing under the shingles? The flashing you see at the bottom that covers the step flashing is called counter flashing

You really need to find someone that knows what their doing or read up carefully on the manufactures recommended method of proper installation of the products installed. For that matter knowing the manufactures recommendation is a good idea no matter who does the work. Their are a lot of well intentioned and experienced contractors that do not really know the details of some things. This is one project that need those details done correctly.

Might be a good time to have the inside of the flues inspected by a certified chimney tech before you spend a bunch of money on the outside.
 
   / Chimney Repair #6  

Egon

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A replacement rather than repair would be a good way to go.

It looks like ordinary concrete blocks were initially used with some being cracked and parged over.
 
   / Chimney Repair #7  

EddieWalker

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It's beyond repair and it needs to be removed. You need to have something new built.
 
   / Chimney Repair #8  

Oldpath05

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And I thought my chimney was bad when I rebuilt it 20 years ago, that's the worst looking chimney I ever seen, I would definitely replace it. Looks like the chimney on the old TV show Green Acres....
 
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citytransplant

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Thanks for the recommendations, opinions, etc. so far. .

I failed to provide a shot of the entire chimney in my initial post. I've done so here, simply to give folks a clearer picture of what I'm dealing with. The brickwork appears to be in good shape. I think at some point the brick work ends and blocks were used, agree? If so, would you guess the brickwork ends at Point B (where the parging begins) or immediately at the top of the corbel, Point A?

I will post a photo of the results of my feeble effort to temporarily patch this mess later. All the masons that I contacted that came highly recommended have already packed it up for the season as far as outdoor work goes so I bit the bullet and did the best I could.
 

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   / Chimney Repair #10  

rekees4300

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What would be the best way to repair this chimney and does it pose any danger in its present condition outside of a piece of concrete falling atop someone's head?

It's beyond repair, best way to fix the problem is replacement or elimination. It does pose a danger of burning your house down via the cracked liner and/or crashing through your roof via collapse.
 
 
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