Common sayings that are wrong or butchered

   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #1  

gsganzer

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I was listening to some folks talking and realized how many people confuse or butcher certain sayings. In some cases, I guess it might be regional differences in common sayings.

Here's an example, "Take it for granted" or do you say, "Take it for granite"?

There are a ton of other examples.
 
   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #3  

CalG

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Ya can't dance, and it's too wet to plow!
 
   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #4  

croquet

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Might I recommend the Trailer Park Boys for an intensive course in mondegreens? Look up "Rickyisms" on the YouTube. Also, it is a course in coarse language.
 
   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #6  

Xfaxman

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One reply to "how are you doing" is "so far so good".

I turn it around, "so good so far", to see their reaction.
 
   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #8  

stuckmotor

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Saying "You can’t eat your cake and have it, too,” instead of the more common, “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” got the Unabomber where he is today, in prison.
 
   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #9  

/pine

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Welp... (actually mean "well")

Ying and yang...(actually mean "yin and yang")
 
   / Common sayings that are wrong or butchered #10  

JasperFrank

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The original 14th Century wording of "Head over Heels," was "Heels over Head;" as in being so excited that one would do a cartwheel or somersault. Somehow the wording got switched by writers in the 19th century. And we have been using it incorrectly ever since.
 
 
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