Contemplating Career Change

grsthegreat

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north idaho
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i get about $95 per hour servicing generators. dont advertise anymore, stopped doing that 5 years ago. more work than i want to have right now. everytime i service 1 new one, they always want business cards to hand out to friends looking for generator service.
 

mbohuntr

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Upstate NY
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Mahindra 1533
Well, I'm on my 3rd career, and contemplating starting over (again).. I left my first career as a fabricator partly because I couldn't make enough to support my family. And partly because my back gave out, and the Dr. suggested I find something easier on the body. I did security work for a while, and found it unchallenging.. so I went back to school and got a degree in electronics, and became an industrial electrician.

I absolutely love what I do, but I am very tired of unrealistic timelines, constantly changing expectations, and the general BS. It seems like every job is an end of the world emergency, and we are just a convienence to MGMT to further their careers. We are on call 24/7 Just got a write up after finishing a rush job 1/2 hour early, but missing a signature.... Again...I love what I do, but if it wasn't for the good benefits, I'd have quit and told them to stuff it long ago. It isn't worth the stress...
 
  
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WVH1977

WVH1977

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Richmond, VA
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New Holland TC40, Ford 841
Thanks for all the replies. My wife stays home and she is homeschooling. Mid-life=early 40's for me. I had another long day today but it went by quick. I really appreciate all the replies.

I am not rushing anything. Just seeking advice and received great feedback. Also talking wth close friends and family too. I am lucky and blessed to be in a good position with job security. However, at the same time due to benefits, pay and job security I am a slave to it as well.

The biggest risk I have taken in this life so far was joining the military and leaving home. That turned out to be the best thing I ever did with my life and led me to where I am at today. I am also very good at what I do. I sometimes wish I was better at other things but it is what it is. If I do decide to leave my current job, I will make sure I have a path forward and enough to get me through.

The good thing is I don't have to leave the position and I don't have to make any rush decisions. I just know the last couple of months it has really been on my mind to just start over. If I did not have a family I think I would have already jumped and took the risk.
 

PuffyC

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Nov 5, 2020
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Oklahoma
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Deere 3032e
I went through exactly this at 40 - had a great paying job but it sucked so bad everyday I’d think the money wasn’t worth it even if it meant we had to live in a shack. I even went to some sessions about a couple skilled trades and was about to pull the trigger, but then I didn’t. Looking back it was probably one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. The job got better and by staying I’ll be able to retire at least 15 years earlier than if I hadn’t. But it’s all just luck and you can’t predict the future. Maybe quitting and becoming a plumber would have led to my own chain of plumbing companies, you never know.
 

ovrszd

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My Dad always said "leave a job for a better job only". His point, always improve your position. Sometimes that is hard to lock down. Good luck in your choices. Keep us posted on whatever course you take!!!
 

Citydude

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Northeast Wyoming
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I guess I always looked at the financial side of jobs I had. It had to support my living standards.

My dream job would have not met that standard.
 

EddieWalker

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Tyler, Texas
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Several, all used and abused.
I forgot to mention that one of the hardest parts of being self employed is getting up and making things happen without anybody telling you what to do. I've met so many contractors that come and go because they start out full of energy and they are getting lots of jobs, but then they lose that drive and slowly it all falls apart. They never seem to realize that they are the problem, that they have become combative with clients instead of understanding that when you work for them, you have to kiss up to them. Being self employed means doing what they want. Every day, you have to be able to push yourself to get up, go do the job, then after the job, buy supplies, look at jobs, write bids and still take care of your home.

Best description that I ever heard is that self employed people only work half the day. You even get to pick which 12 hours you want to work!!!

There are just a lot of people that need somebody to set their schedule for them, tell them what to do that day, and then make sure that they do it properly, who will never succeed on their own. You have to be brutally honest with yourself if you are that type of person, or if you are a go getter, self motivator type of person that does not need encouragement, or atta boys to do the best job possible, every day.
 

MoKelly

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Best description that I ever heard is that self employed people only work half the day. You even get to pick which 12 hours you want to work!!!

You are so correct!

My wife quit her office job (accounting) and opened up a tennis club (her dream - since her early 20’s).

She worked hard and long hours - first refurbishing a huge warehouse then building a membership base. She was everything - owner, maintenance crew, back office, marketing and pro. She opened at 7am and closed at 9pm. 7 days a week.

After 6 months she was able to hire folks to work at front desk and more pros. Still worked many hours but it got so she could spend more time with members - which is what she wanted.

10 years later she was doing very well. Decent money - but still not an overwhelming per hour rate.

Then, she was given an offer to buy the business. More than she thought possible. They had big expansion plans. They wanted indoor soccer and other sports. Basically, they wanted the facility.

So, she decided she could make more money selling and investing then working - both in total and per hour.

She looks back fondly on all the work and stress. But, she did sell when the opportunity arose.

I 1000% admire all folks who run their own business. It’s not easy snd definitely not for most.

MoKelly
 
 
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