Diesel newbie-operating questions

   #1  

etpm

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Recently I bought my first diesel engine. This 40 year old engine came complete with a 40 year old Yanmar YM2310 tractor wrapped around the engine.
The manual says to pull the throttle handle all the way to full throttle, pull the decompression knob out and crank the engine until it starts. Once it starts set throttle to 1500 RPM or lower and let it run for at least 3 minutes before using the tractor. When stopping the engine it should be run at an idle for 1 minute to cool off before shutting down.
I have questions now about how to run this engine. I live just north of Seattle so the temperatures the engine will experience will be pretty moderate most of the time. Is it really necessary to run the engine for 3 minutes to warm it up? if so then why? And do I really need to idle the engine for 1 minute to cool it down? It's not that hot here usually and when we do have weather above 90 degrees I'm not gonna be running the tractor anyway.
I see folks who let their diesel engines idle away for long periods of time on a pretty regular basis. Not just big trucks but pickup trucks, backhoes, excavators, and small engined equipment like my tractor. I shut off my gasoline engined Case 580 CK backhoe rather than let it idle for more than a few minutes. Is it a bad thing to shut off my diesel, shovel stuff into the loader, and then restart it after maybe 5 minutes to do more work? And to do this several times a day?
For the next couple days I will be using a rock rake on an area I will be planting with grass. After a few passes with the rake I sort out and shovel all the rocks into the loader and then dump all the rocks into a hole I dug with my 580CK for this purpose. It takes 5 to 10 minutes to do this shoveling and sorting. I don't like having to let the diesel idle while I sort and shovel. So that's why the above question is asked.
I guess my last question for now is about fuel. I use the diesel fuel that comes from the pump right next to the gasoline pump at my local gas station. It's the same fuel that over the road vehicles use. I know it is low sulfur fuel and that 40 years ago engines were designed to use different fuels. On top of that, my engine was designed to be used in Asian countries, not the USA, and maybe their diesel was significantly different than the fuel available to me today. Because of this I am using a diesel fuel additive that is supposed to clean injectors and increase the cetane rating. Should I continue to do this?
Thanks,
Eric
 
   #2  

mrmikey

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These are just my opinions so take it for what they're worth and what you paid :) :
Is it really necessary to run the engine for 3 minutes to warm it up?
I always let my engines run a bit before I do anything with them, truck, tractor, chainsaw, trimmer or what have you. I have a remote start on my truck and I always start it a bit before I'm ready. My theory is everything will reach their operating temperature and clearances before there's any load on the engine as well as lubrication gets where it's supposed to.
And do I really need to idle the engine for 1 minute to cool it down?
Cool down is kind of a misnomer, equalize temperatures would be a better description IMHO unless you're referring to a turbo. Again, I do the same to any engine powered piece of equipment.
Friend of mine had a turbo something truck. He'd come to work right off a 110KPH highway and shut the engine off....I'd cringe thinking about the oil coking around the bearings in the turbo.

Is it a bad thing to shut off my diesel, shovel stuff into the loader, and then restart it after maybe 5 minutes to do more work? And to do this several times a day?
Depends...if it's been run hard from dumping the load to come back to be filled up, I'd leave it running. If you can just idle back to the location for a couple of minutes I'd shut it off.
If you're working it and then have to do something else, I'd let it idle for a bit.

Because of this I am using a diesel fuel additive that is supposed to clean injectors and increase the cetane rating. Should I continue to do this?
Exact same as I do, I use Hawes but to each his own............Mike
 
   #3  

Hay Dude

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I’d love to have time to warm up everything, but in my world, you gotta move fast. What I do is start up, wait maybe a minute, then idle slowly out of the tractor shop or through the field to get things lubricated, then being up the throttle.
On shut down, I idle a few minutes for the turbo charger. Been living this way for over 30 years of diesel operation. I have never had an engine failure, or turbocharger failure or really any engine related issue.
I have seen many an owner start up and go straight to 2000RPM and shut down immediately after a long day of work. I don’t recommend that.
You might want to include a lubricity additive to your fuel.
5 minutes of idling isn’t a big deal. You are not hurting anything. Frequent stopping and starting is not the best because of the extra work on your battery & starter. Diesel engine is higher compression and harder to get cranking.
If you don’t have a turbo, you can shut down after a brief idle-down. I have had lots of non turbo diesels I have shut down after merely dropping the rpm to idle, again zero engine issues.
With Diesel engines, the most important thing is fresh, clean fuel.
 
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   #4  

SmallChange

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It's hard to beat having the manufacturer's own recommendations in front of you.

My manual says to start the engine with the fuel control set midrange. It does not call out a wait time before beginning operations. For shutting down, it says to set the fuel control all the way down, then do other things (parking brake, 3PT lower, etc), then turn key off. There's no time called out but it would take maybe half a minute to see to all the other things.

I have the idea that a cold engine would prefer to run fast rather than slow, though of course without a load. At least, the car I had with an automatic transmission wouldn't let the engine work below maybe 2500 rpm until the moment the blue "cold" light went out. The first mile or two of my morning commute, I sounded like a vacuum cleaner.
 
   #5  

Avenger

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Is it really necessary to run the engine for 3 minutes to warm it up? if so then why?

Yes. And probably better to let it warm up for longer, especially in colder times of the year. Why? Several different reasons, but mainly lubrication and wear. Think of how an engine works, oil sits in the bottom of the oil pan when the engine is not running. The oil is cold and thick, and doesn't move very well. Even at more moderate climates, oil is simply thicker than at operating temps. That oil needs to get pumped up and moved around the engine to lubricate it before stressing the engine by putting a load on it.

Another reason to let it warm up is wear. Along with lubrication, the engine will start to expand and seal its self up. This is kind of a gross over simplification, but think of the pistons and the cylinders. They are cold and the rings are not sealing very well. The engine starts and the hot exhaust starts warming up the pistons, right about where the exhaust port is. Now, before the engine is warmed up, you put a significant load on it. The exhaust temps rise quickly, expanding the side of the cylinder, piston, and rings. You'll get uneven wear and in extreme cases, scaring. Again, its an oversimplification, but hopefully starts to make sense.
And do I really need to idle the engine for 1 minute to cool it down? It's not that hot here usually and when we do have weather above 90 degrees I'm not gonna be running the tractor anyway.

Yes. And again, I'd do it for longer. This is more critical if your tractor has a turbo. The turbo on a diesel, especially after working hard, is going to be screaming hot. So hot that it will burn off any lubrication if simply turned off. The oil pump delivers oil to the turbo during operation. The oil flow suddenly stops flowing (because the engine is off), but the turbo is still glowing red hot, then any oil will simply burn away. This can cause serious turbo issues. Let the turbo cool down by idling the engine. If it cools too quickly, it can also crack!
Another good reason to let the engine idle before shutdown is to simply normalize the temps in the engine. Remember that piston ring with the hot exhaust temps? That is still the case here, the engine is hotter on one side, than the other. Let it simply idle for a few minutes before shutting it down. Simply helps minimize wear.
Is it a bad thing to shut off my diesel, shovel stuff into the loader, and then restart it after maybe 5 minutes to do more work? And to do this several times a day?

Again, following the advise above, I'd let it idle before shutting it off. Now, if you went out on a cool morning, fired it up, let it run for a few minutes, moved it slowly over to the stuff pile, and shut it off. There is probably nothing wrong. However, if you go out, fire it up, go mow at high RPM, do other heavy work with it for more than a few minutes, getting that engine really warmed up, pull up to the stuff pile, and simply shut it off, then yeah... thats not good.
Diesels can run, at an idle, for a very long time without any issues. Simply let it idle while you shovel your stuff.

I guess my last question for now is about fuel. I use the diesel fuel that comes from the pump right next to the gasoline pump at my local gas station. It's the same fuel that over the road vehicles use. I know it is low sulfur fuel and that 40 years ago engines were designed to use different fuels. On top of that, my engine was designed to be used in Asian countries, not the USA, and maybe their diesel was significantly different than the fuel available to me today. Because of this I am using a diesel fuel additive that is supposed to clean injectors and increase the cetane rating. Should I continue to do this?

Ah, the fuel question. This question has been asked and answered many times over the last several years. To be honest, diesel is diesel. And in your case, with your 40 year old diesel engine, you can run pretty much anything. However, I'm personally not a fan fuel additives. If you get clogged injectors, its not hard to replace them. You're more likely to get a clogged injector from particulates in the fuel and your tank than you are from deposits left behind. Make sure you change your fuel filter often. I'll probably catch some hate for saying this, but I believe that most fuel and oil additives are snake oil. The big question is dyed or clear diesel. There really isnt any difference, and if I were you, find some dyed diesel for your tractor. No reason to pay the State even more taxes.

Hope this has answered your questions.
 
   #6  

Jerry/MT

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Recently I bought my first diesel engine. This 40 year old engine came complete with a 40 year old Yanmar YM2310 tractor wrapped around the engine.
The manual says to pull the throttle handle all the way to full throttle, pull the decompression knob out and crank the engine until it starts. Once it starts set throttle to 1500 RPM or lower and let it run for at least 3 minutes before using the tractor. When stopping the engine it should be run at an idle for 1 minute to cool off before shutting down.
I have questions now about how to run this engine. I live just north of Seattle so the temperatures the engine will experience will be pretty moderate most of the time. Is it really necessary to run the engine for 3 minutes to warm it up? if so then why? And do I really need to idle the engine for 1 minute to cool it down? It's not that hot here usually and when we do have weather above 90 degrees I'm not gonna be running the tractor anyway.
I see folks who let their diesel engines idle away for long periods of time on a pretty regular basis. Not just big trucks but pickup trucks, backhoes, excavators, and small engined equipment like my tractor. I shut off my gasoline engined Case 580 CK backhoe rather than let it idle for more than a few minutes. Is it a bad thing to shut off my diesel, shovel stuff into the loader, and then restart it after maybe 5 minutes to do more work? And to do this several times a day?
For the next couple days I will be using a rock rake on an area I will be planting with grass. After a few passes with the rake I sort out and shovel all the rocks into the loader and then dump all the rocks into a hole I dug with my 580CK for this purpose. It takes 5 to 10 minutes to do this shoveling and sorting. I don't like having to let the diesel idle while I sort and shovel. So that's why the above question is asked.
I guess my last question for now is about fuel. I use the diesel fuel that comes from the pump right next to the gasoline pump at my local gas station. It's the same fuel that over the road vehicles use. I know it is low sulfur fuel and that 40 years ago engines were designed to use different fuels. On top of that, my engine was designed to be used in Asian countries, not the USA, and maybe their diesel was significantly different than the fuel available to me today. Because of this I am using a diesel fuel additive that is supposed to clean injectors and increase the cetane rating. Should I continue to do this?
Thanks,
Eric
In my opinion, any IC engine should be allowed to idle for a few minutes before being put under load. That's mainly to make sure the lube oil is starting to circulate.
From a warm up stand point, diesels are different than spark ignition (SI) engines. Spark ignition engines run within a relatively very narrow range of fuel/air ratios and therefore the peak cylinder temperatures are relatively constant. Power is controlled via the throttle plate regulating the airflow. SI engines naturally warm up quicker without load.
Diesels, on the other hand run with an unrestricted intake and power is controlled by fuel flow so the diesel runs over a wide range of fuel/air ratios. This means the peak cylinder temperatures vary with power output. It takes a long time to warm up an idling diesel on the typical tractor. (The Powerstroke diesel on my F350 uses an exhaust throttle plate to increase fuel air ratio on cold start up to facilitate warm up.) The best way to warm up your diesel tractor is at moderate load until it starts to come up to temperature.

I also believe it is better to let any IC engine idle for a minute or two before shut down. If you have a turboed Diesel, let it idle for at least a minute after full load operation. This allows the internal turbomachinery to cool down and not rub on the external casing leading to poor performance and possibly damage. Also many turbos rely on the engine oil pump for lube so you want the turbomachinery to slow down before the lube supply is cut off.
 
   #7  

CobyRupert

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There’s no throttle plate in a diesel, so it takes in the same amount of air per revolution at idle that it does revving or working hard. The compression cycle creates heat, but I believe it’s the fuel, when working, that will warm the engine faster than just pumping cold air through the motor with an idle amount of fuel being burnt.
 
   #8  

Diggin It

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Is it a bad thing to shut off my diesel, shovel stuff into the loader, and then restart it after maybe 5 minutes to do more work? And to do this several times a day?
That can be hard on batteries and starters. It can run a battery down since it takes a lot more power to start an engine repeatedly than some charging systems provide in short duration runs.
 
   #9  
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I agree with all of the above. Gently. That's the way I treat my vehicles (tractor's included). The only thing I'd add - I enjoy working outside on my farm, listening to the birds, wind, etc. When I stop the tractor to dismount and work on the ground, I shut off the tractor. Batteries and starters may be the price I pay for doing that, but the pleasure exceeds the cost. I've got 1200 hours on the tractor I've had since new, and still with the original starter. Replaced one battery since 2009 - doesn't seem to be too much of a cost to work without the sound of engines running.
 
   #10  

Tinhack

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I'd lean to the cautious side. A 40 year old running tractor is still running because the previous owner(s) followed the operating and maintenance suggested in the manual. 😏
 
   #11  

Tx Jim

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There’s no throttle plate in a diesel, so it takes in the same amount of air per revolution at idle that it does revving or working hard. The compression cycle creates heat, but I believe it’s the fuel, when working, that will warm the engine faster than just pumping cold air through the motor with an idle amount of fuel being burnt.
I agree that there's no throttle plate in a diesel engine BUT I'd like to see some proof that a diesel engine ingests same amount of air at idle speed as full rpm's. May I ask what you think the purpose of a turbo-charger is? Please explain your theory of how fuel warms an engine without the aid of heat of combustion?
 
   #12  

IndyJay

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I agree that there's no throttle plate in a diesel engine BUT I'd like to see some proof that a diesel engine ingests same amount of air at idle speed as full rpm's. May I ask what you think the purpose of a turbo-charger is? Please explain your theory of how fuel warms an engine without the aid of heat of combustion?
Per stroke, not total consumption.
 
   #13  

Egon

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Turbo’s pressurize the inlet air forcing more into the cylinder on each suction stroke.

just compressing air will generate heat. That’s why intercoolers are used to cool the compressed air so it’s denser.

On a piston air compressor note that the head gets hot.
 
   #14  

Beeenvenue

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I agree that there's no throttle plate in a diesel engine BUT I'd like to see some proof that a diesel engine ingests same amount of air at idle speed as full rpm's. May I ask what you think the purpose of a turbo-charger is? Please explain your theory of how fuel warms an engine without the aid of heat of combustion?
He said same amount per revolution. Higher rpm - higher airflow.
 
   #15  

ROUSTABOUT

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You can shut the engine off and start it up to save a dollar worth of fuel. You can also buy a 300.00 starter which is way more than the fuel you save. My neighbor cranks his truck each morning early. Leaves it running all day until he comes in at 7:30 pm. Keeps them 500k miles. If he goes in the office it's out there idling. If he's on a location (oilfield) truck is idling all day six days week.
 
   #16  

Williy

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A truck is different than a tractor! Tractors are not
made to idle and the tier 4's you don't want to idle
them at ALL! I run my tractor at 1500 rpm's set
brake put in neutral and get off tractor and do what
I have to do then back in cab and back to work! IMHO
I don't believe its good to shut off tractor hop off for a
few minutes and then start back up believe its better
to keep tractor running keeping engine hot believe its
much better this way.

willy
 
   #17  

CobyRupert

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I agree that there's no throttle plate in a diesel engine BUT I'd like to see some proof that a diesel engine ingests same amount of air at idle speed as full rpm's. May I ask what you think the purpose of a turbo-charger is? Please explain your theory of how fuel warms an engine without the aid of heat of combustion?

Yeah, for her sake of simplicity I didn’t get into turbos, or friction losses in the intake and exhaust that are a function of rpm.

There’s the heat of combustion and the heat of the (air) compression. I believe that the combustion heat (by dumping fuel in and working motor at an rpm above idle) warms the motor quicker.
 
   #18  

SmallChange

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and the tier 4's you don't want to idle
them at ALL!
Can you please say more about this? I've heard similar things but never understood why. I have a pretty new tier 4 with about 60 hours on it, and still haven't gone through a re-gen cycle. It works hard some times, but usually it has a light load. And I'm also unclear whether by "idle" most people are referring generally to running the engine without a load, or more specifically doing that at low rpm. I think I've heard people use the word both ways.
 
   #19  

CobyRupert

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I think with Tier IV, what they really mean is that a low exhaust temp will clog the filter faster. An idle exhaust temp is probably lower than a faster (non-loaded) rpm, which is a lower temp than working it hard, etc..etc..
Even without Tier IV, my understanding is a low exhaust temp can cause wet stacking.
 
   #20  

Williy

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I want to keep the exhaust hot so I don't need
to regen any time soon so running/standing I
keep 1500 rpm's

willy
 
   #21  

deserteagle71

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Can you please say more about this? I've heard similar things but never understood why. I have a pretty new tier 4 with about 60 hours on it, and still haven't gone through a re-gen cycle. It works hard some times, but usually it has a light load. And I'm also unclear whether by "idle" most people are referring generally to running the engine without a load, or more specifically doing that at low rpm. I think I've heard people use the word both ways.
What does your owner's manual say? The manual for my Kubota specifically states, in no uncertain terms, to keep idling at a minimum. That means keeping the rpms up so the exhaust stays hot.

Screen shot from my owner's manual:
Idling engine.jpg


(PM = particulate matter)
 
   #22  

CobyRupert

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…what if you idle it unnecessarily, but then make sure to work it hard and hot for an extended period of time at the end of the day? Or every few days. Or often…often enough. It has to partially mimic a regen cycle.
 
   #23  

SmallChange

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What does your owner's manual say?

Mine does not say much about this. It does say that when driving the tractor the "throttle lever" should be set for an engine speed above 1500 (though it's not a throttle). And it lists various RPMs such as min, max, and nominal in the table showing driving speeds for different gears. There's no reference to "idle" in the index and text searching only turned up the things I mentioned, and no advice on running the engine without a load. Also no mention on setting engine speed when the tractor is sitting still but working through the PTO or hydraulics (other than notes about what engine speed correlates to 540 RPM PTO speed).

Thanks! The explanation about exhaust temperature does make sense!
 
   #24  

PILOON

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With all the gearing in a tractor I don't hesitate to drive my tractor immediately after start up, even on cold winter days.
OK, I do so at idle speeds and I do have it plugged in so the oil is warm and flowing.
Sort of just put putting along and naturally not working it. When I slip the clutch there is no change in RPM's at all.
OK, not idling but for sure loafing.
 
   #25  

Midniteoyl

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When just doing general non-PTO duties, loader work, driving around, etc, I run my idle up to ~1500 rpm and use the linked pedal. About 3.5 months with no regen yet.
 
   #26  

RalphVa

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Recently I bought my first diesel engine. This 40 year old engine came complete with a 40 year old Yanmar YM2310 tractor wrapped around the engine.
The manual says to pull the throttle handle all the way to full throttle, pull the decompression knob out and crank the engine until it starts. Once it starts set throttle to 1500 RPM or lower and let it run for at least 3 minutes before using the tractor. When stopping the engine it should be run at an idle for 1 minute to cool off before shutting down.
I have questions now about how to run this engine. I live just north of Seattle so the temperatures the engine will experience will be pretty moderate most of the time. Is it really necessary to run the engine for 3 minutes to warm it up? if so then why? And do I really need to idle the engine for 1 minute to cool it down? It's not that hot here usually and when we do have weather above 90 degrees I'm not gonna be running the tractor anyway.
I see folks who let their diesel engines idle away for long periods of time on a pretty regular basis. Not just big trucks but pickup trucks, backhoes, excavators, and small engined equipment like my tractor. I shut off my gasoline engined Case 580 CK backhoe rather than let it idle for more than a few minutes. Is it a bad thing to shut off my diesel, shovel stuff into the loader, and then restart it after maybe 5 minutes to do more work? And to do this several times a day?
For the next couple days I will be using a rock rake on an area I will be planting with grass. After a few passes with the rake I sort out and shovel all the rocks into the loader and then dump all the rocks into a hole I dug with my 580CK for this purpose. It takes 5 to 10 minutes to do this shoveling and sorting. I don't like having to let the diesel idle while I sort and shovel. So that's why the above question is asked.
I guess my last question for now is about fuel. I use the diesel fuel that comes from the pump right next to the gasoline pump at my local gas station. It's the same fuel that over the road vehicles use. I know it is low sulfur fuel and that 40 years ago engines were designed to use different fuels. On top of that, my engine was designed to be used in Asian countries, not the USA, and maybe their diesel was significantly different than the fuel available to me today. Because of this I am using a diesel fuel additive that is supposed to clean injectors and increase the cetane rating. Should I continue to do this?
Thanks,
Eric
Drove diesel cars for 38 years. Never ever just let them sit and idle after starting. Just started and drove close to normal. Just didn't rev to maximum for about a mile. On the Benzes, you had to rev to maximum to get anywhere.

On the tractors for 17 years, just start and run gently for a few minutes. Diesels won't warm up much just sitting.

Very seldom used an additive. Did after one Benz was stored for 4 years, and diesel had turned brown. It won't do that now with ULSD. Diesel sits in 60 gallon tank for the generator for much longer.

P.S. Had one diesel car for 25 years and 215k. It was the one that got stored those 4 years.
 
Last edited:
   #27  

Tx Jim

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Very seldom used an additive. Did after one Benz was stored for 4 years, and diesel had turned brown. It won't do that now with ULSD. Diesel sits in 60 gallon tank for the generator for much longer.
Storage life of ULSD is dependent on if fuel has any biodiesel in it. Biodiesel doesn't store very well for extended periods of time
 
   #28  

DieselBound

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[Pertaining to the question of idle time] Allowing the hydraulic fluid to warm up a bit is, IMO, more important that trying to warm up the engine.

I pretty much go by the look of the exhaust. Initially you're going to see visible particles*, but then that clears up, and at that point the engine oil is likely flowing well enough to begin to operate the tractor. I always have to travel a bit of distance before I'm actually engaging in work, so the travel is at 1,500 to 1,800 rpm and then I'll crank it up as needed.

* Note that even with a DPF you'll see signs. Might be moisture? At any rate, it's still a gauge that I use/go by.
 
   #29  

Bentrim

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Tractor
Massey Ferguson 245
Just a few thoughts of someone that has worked with farm machinery for over 20 years, small engines for over 15 years. Also studied recommendations of people that should know how to operate engines, manufacturers, and other "experts".

Most recommend to start engine allow a minimum time to run at about half throttle, 30 seconds to a minute, the go to work s l o w l y. Reason-- the engine will warm up faster doing work than sitting idle, wear is reduced as the engine warms up faster, fuel is burned more efficiently by a warmed up engine, pollution is reduced. On diesels recommend starting at WOT then pulling the throttle back as soon as it "hits" before the rpm starts to climb. This usually gives a full fuel load for quicker starting, some pumps has an excess fuel button for the same purpose.

If an engine especially a diesel is left to sit idling the combustion chambers cool down and fuel is not burnt efficiently or completely. You will get what is called wet stacking on most diesels that are not worked hard. Wet stacking is when unburned fuel collects in the exhaust system and runs out of the manifold, muffler, or exhaust connections, most folks will say "oil is leaking where the muffler connects to the manifold" nope not oil but diesel fuel that has turned black from soot. After an diesel has been warmed up and started it is usually not difficult or hard on the starter to restart, of course there are some that need glow plugged even in 90* weather. Shutting the down save wear on the whole tractor and reduces pollution.

As for shutting down the engine IF the tractor has been loaded do NOT shut off immediately leave it idle to half throttle for a few minutes before shutting down. Years ago some farmers had a problem cracking heads, found they would be plowing, or other heavy loads and just shut it off. Give the engine temperatures time to equalize and get rid of the hot spots before stopping the engine, then bring down to an idle for a minute before shutting down, especially the turbo needs the heat equalized and removed from the exhaust side or the seals coke with oil and leak thru the exhaust. Ever hear a turbo whirring after engine shut down? remember no oil no lubrication.

Even had some farmers who never used the throttle on NA engines. Started it wide open and shut it down wide open. Wonder why his repair bill was high?
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#30  
OP
E

etpm

Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2021
Messages
695
Location
Whidbey Island, WA
Tractor
yanmar ym2310
Just a few thoughts of someone that has worked with farm machinery for over 20 years, small engines for over 15 years. Also studied recommendations of people that should know how to operate engines, manufacturers, and other "experts".

Most recommend to start engine allow a minimum time to run at about half throttle, 30 seconds to a minute, the go to work s l o w l y. Reason-- the engine will warm up faster doing work than sitting idle, wear is reduced as the engine warms up faster, fuel is burned more efficiently by a warmed up engine, pollution is reduced. On diesels recommend starting at WOT then pulling the throttle back as soon as it "hits" before the rpm starts to climb. This usually gives a full fuel load for quicker starting, some pumps has an excess fuel button for the same purpose.

If an engine especially a diesel is left to sit idling the combustion chambers cool down and fuel is not burnt efficiently or completely. You will get what is called wet stacking on most diesels that are not worked hard. Wet stacking is when unburned fuel collects in the exhaust system and runs out of the manifold, muffler, or exhaust connections, most folks will say "oil is leaking where the muffler connects to the manifold" nope not oil but diesel fuel that has turned black from soot. After an diesel has been warmed up and started it is usually not difficult or hard on the starter to restart, of course there are some that need glow plugged even in 90* weather. Shutting the down save wear on the whole tractor and reduces pollution.

As for shutting down the engine IF the tractor has been loaded do NOT shut off immediately leave it idle to half throttle for a few minutes before shutting down. Years ago some farmers had a problem cracking heads, found they would be plowing, or other heavy loads and just shut it off. Give the engine temperatures time to equalize and get rid of the hot spots before stopping the engine, then bring down to an idle for a minute before shutting down, especially the turbo needs the heat equalized and removed from the exhaust side or the seals coke with oil and leak thru the exhaust. Ever hear a turbo whirring after engine shut down? remember no oil no lubrication.

Even had some farmers who never used the throttle on NA engines. Started it wide open and shut it down wide open. Wonder why his repair bill was high?
Thanks all for the good replies. My Yanmar YM2310 doesn't have a turbo so no worries there about coking up bearings and since it's 40 years old no worries about modern pollution devices. But the other info is helpful and I think I know now how long to let it idle before shutting it down when the job requires manual labor such as shoveling. BTW, the manual says to use the decompression knob when starting, and even when cold, say 50 degrees F, the engine lights right up. So starting is easy on the starter and battery, which amazingly still holds a charge after sitting two years.
Eric
 
   #31  

Beeenvenue

Silver Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2019
Messages
219
Location
Ennis, TX
Tractor
Kioti 3510SE HST
Just a few thoughts of someone that has worked with farm machinery for over 20 years, small engines for over 15 years. Also studied recommendations of people that should know how to operate engines, manufacturers, and other "experts".

Most recommend to start engine allow a minimum time to run at about half throttle, 30 seconds to a minute, the go to work s l o w l y. Reason-- the engine will warm up faster doing work than sitting idle, wear is reduced as the engine warms up faster, fuel is burned more efficiently by a warmed up engine, pollution is reduced. On diesels recommend starting at WOT then pulling the throttle back as soon as it "hits" before the rpm starts to climb. This usually gives a full fuel load for quicker starting, some pumps has an excess fuel button for the same purpose.

If an engine especially a diesel is left to sit idling the combustion chambers cool down and fuel is not burnt efficiently or completely. You will get what is called wet stacking on most diesels that are not worked hard. Wet stacking is when unburned fuel collects in the exhaust system and runs out of the manifold, muffler, or exhaust connections, most folks will say "oil is leaking where the muffler connects to the manifold" nope not oil but diesel fuel that has turned black from soot. After an diesel has been warmed up and started it is usually not difficult or hard on the starter to restart, of course there are some that need glow plugged even in 90* weather. Shutting the down save wear on the whole tractor and reduces pollution.

As for shutting down the engine IF the tractor has been loaded do NOT shut off immediately leave it idle to half throttle for a few minutes before shutting down. Years ago some farmers had a problem cracking heads, found they would be plowing, or other heavy loads and just shut it off. Give the engine temperatures time to equalize and get rid of the hot spots before stopping the engine, then bring down to an idle for a minute before shutting down, especially the turbo needs the heat equalized and removed from the exhaust side or the seals coke with oil and leak thru the exhaust. Ever hear a turbo whirring after engine shut down? remember no oil no lubrication.

Even had some farmers who never used the throttle on NA engines. Started it wide open and shut it down wide open. Wonder why his repair bill was high?
WOT Perhaps on older diesels. That is exactly opposite of what most modern user manuals say. My kioti for example (covers 2610 mechanical and 3510/4010 common rail with DPF) are start at idle and let warm before operating at load.

So I start at idle (1000 rpm), back out of the barn, rev to 1500 until the temp gage begins moving, rev to 2200-2400, and work lightly until temp is normal then run hard.

On shutdown I let idle (1000 rpm) for 1-2 min per the manual
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#32  
OP
E

etpm

Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2021
Messages
695
Location
Whidbey Island, WA
Tractor
yanmar ym2310
WOT Perhaps on older diesels. That is exactly opposite of what most modern user manuals say. My kioti for example (covers 2610 mechanical and 3510/4010 common rail with DPF) are start at idle and let warm before operating at load.

So I start at idle (1000 rpm), back out of the barn, rev to 1500 until the temp gage begins moving, rev to 2200-2400, and work lightly until temp is normal then run hard.

On shutdown I let idle (1000 rpm) for 1-2 min per the manual
My tractor will start when the throttle is set to about 1000 RPM but is quite noisy when I forget and do that. It sure seemed weird to me starting at full throttle but like I said in my first post this is my first diesel.
 
   #33  

deserteagle71

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2017
Messages
1,145
Location
northern Nevada
Tractor
John Deere 2020 diesel, Kubota M7060HDC12
Here's what the owner's manual for my 2016 Kubota M7060 says about warmup:
Kubota engine warmup.jpg
 
   #34  

HEY YOU

New member
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
5
Tractor
John Deere 5075M
I let my 5075M idle at 1100 RPM and John Deere says to idle it at that speed so.... I don't let it idle all day, I dont shut it off for less than 15 minutes of idle, I cool it down 4 minutes after mowing etc.I dont have DEF, its a 2013.
 
 
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