Does anyone have one of these

   / Does anyone have one of these #2  
Barryh said:
Do they work? I have two chain saws setting here with dull blades. :rolleyes: Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

Of course, doesn't everyone . Just kidding. I just picked one up about a month ago. I then bolted a piece of angle to the bottom to mount it in vise.

What I have used n the past, was a Dremel tool with the chain sharpener stones. Does quite will. I also have one of the Oregon chain saw grinder that hooks up to the 12v battery for sharpening in the field.

I just received a bar and chain for my hydraulic chain saw. Ebay is a great place to shop. I hope to check it out in the near future. If I can get it fitted just right on a boom, I have some tree work planed.
 
   / Does anyone have one of these
  • Thread Starter
#3  
J_J said:
Of course, doesn't everyone . Just kidding. I just picked one up about a month ago. I then bolted a piece of angle to the bottom to mount it in vise.

What I have used n the past, was a Dremel tool with the chain sharpener stones. Does quite will. I also have one of the Oregon chain saw grinder that hooks up to the 12v battery for sharpening in the field.

I just received a bar and chain for my hydraulic chain saw. Ebay is a great place to shop. I hope to check it out in the near future. If I can get it fitted just right on a boom, I have some tree work planed.
I get tired of ordering and replacing my chains so guess I'll buy one. Thanks.
 
   / Does anyone have one of these #4  
Any idea how long that price is good for?
 
   / Does anyone have one of these #5  
J_J said:
I just received a bar and chain for my hydraulic chain saw. Ebay is a great place to shop. I hope to check it out in the near future. If I can get it fitted just right on a boom, I have some tree work planed.

JJ:

Are you referring to one of those hydraulic concrete-cutting chain saws?
If not, what kind do you have? Is it intended to be remote-controlled?
 
   / Does anyone have one of these #6  
dfkrug said:
JJ:

Are you referring to one of those hydraulic concrete-cutting chain saws?
If not, what kind do you have? Is it intended to be remote-controlled?


I have one of those hydraulic chainsaws that is used by the tree people. It is hand held, but can be moved as far as the hoses will allow. It could be used with the PT to cut and maintain trails. If I put it on the end of a boom which is attached to my PT-1445, I can reach up into lower tree limbs and do some trimming. I also have the hydraulic backpack which can drive the hydraulic chain saw and 10 in disk with carbide blades. There is a picture of it on this forum if I can find it. I believe the manufacture is Fairmont.
 

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   / Does anyone have one of these #7  
I got one of the 12v ones.. but really prefer to just use a rat tail file on it.. I think it makes the chins last a bit longer.. etc..

Soundguy
 
   / Does anyone have one of these #8  
Don't cut anymore, but in our first 18 years here (in the country) I cut an average of 6 cords each year. Always used a hand file and a depth/angle gauge. Doesn't take more than 5-8 minutes to field dress a chain, and then perhaps 20 minutes with a small flat file every 3-4 sharpenings to adjust the depth guides. I tried a couple of different chain holders/automatic or semi-autmatic sharpeners, and none was as consistent as I was with a hand file. Before we actually moved I had paid someone to sharpen a chain a couple times before I figured out it was not even remotely rocket science. Also learned the incredible difference in chain quality. Found stihl branded chain way outlasted most others, clearly justifying the increased price, and learned that Oregon (and others) make multiple grades of chain...and yes, the best costs the most.
 
   / Does anyone have one of these #9  
LMTC is right, it is no where near rocket science. Buy a file for that size chain and have at it. It helps when starting out to have a new chain tooth to help show you how to properly orient the file. They make different types of depth and angle gauges for filing chains, the one I find easiest is the flat plate type with guide marks for proper angle that attaches right to the file. I have used one of those fancy mechanical file olders that holds the file in the perfect orientation, but I never noted any real leap in finished sharpening quality over doing it by hand to justify the cost and additional time it takes to set it up and use it to do both sides of a chain. As mentioned it takes about 5 minutes to touch up a chain and a little longer occasionally to reset the depth gauges. A little practice to get a feel for it and you will be able to do a passable job without an angle gauge.

I have used a rotary chain file grinder bit in a dremmel tool to rough in a really bad chain such as one I have used cutting stumps and roots and has seen a lot of rock damage. Even using this, I always follow up with a file to finish the job and true up the cutting circle on the teeth.

The problem I see with the abrasive type grinder bits and wheels is that they are not overall as hard as the chain teeth and shed their abrasive material while cutting. In doing this, they will change their shape and size and transfer these changes on down the line in the form of cutting different shaped teeth. Following up with a file(harder than the chain tooth) will restore the proper cutting circle shape/size to the tooth. If used, you also want to make sure you get all of the abrasive dust off the chain or it will cause wear in places you don't want it to such as the chain links or the bar.
 
   / Does anyone have one of these #10  
I have the HF chain saw sharpener. Works dandy for me... There is a knack to how you do it, quickly learned. Worth the cost to me. I got it on sale about a year ago.
 
 
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