Elevation = rough start up..?

TMGT

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Yeah give it more throttle. That’ll help resolve it.…
It actually does help as it is more efficient at higher rpm/fuel setting, since it already has a higher fuel to air ratio due to the lower atmospheric pressure it can help smooth it out.
 

Hay Dude

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It actually does help as it is more efficient at higher rpm/fuel setting, since it already has a higher fuel to air ratio due to the lower atmospheric pressure it can help smooth it out.
I know, that’s why I supported the suggestion!
 

the old grind

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Yeah, diesels have to have the right fuel/air mixture at any rpm. Just give it a little more choke. ;)
 

PILOON

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I had my MT125 here at an elevation of 7,000 ft..... yes it starts a bit rougher when cold. I used to hold the glow plugs for at least 20 seconds, the results were dramatic! Try it and see if it improves your startup.
Also a MT owner but at 1500 ft.
In winter I always need a block heater for 1 hour and often cycle the glow plugs twice.
Heck even in summer I need glow plugs, just the nature of the beast.
 

sea2summit

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Sea level air pressure is average 14.7 lbs/PSI. Let's call it 15. 15 divided by 2 equals 7.5 which can also be expressed as 13.3%. So that would translate into about 13.3% lower pressure when compressed in the engine. I dunno how that translates into temperature drop but less air compressed into the same space will have a lower temperature. I do know though that there will be about 13.3% less air available for combustion. So I guess max HP would be lower. But since the diesel engine types I'm familiar with, which are 40 years old or older, always compress as much air as possible since the air isn't throttled, it seems like there would be plenty of air at any setting below max fuel injection. So maybe less air compressed leads to lower compressed air temp which leads to harder starting.
Eric
Ummmm, pretty sure that's not how math works to get a percentage.

"Air" is also a dangerous assumption. "Air" doesn't cause ignition it's the O2 in the air.

For partial pressure O2 at sea level it's ~20.9 at ~14.7PSI, going to 3,200' it's just less than ~2 PSI lost (about 1.8), so (1.8PSI/14.7PSI)*20.9 PPO2=~2.55PPO2.

So loosing ~2.55PPO2 from sea level that's ~2.55PPO2/20.9PPO2= 12.2% loss of O2 per volume.

Carry on.
 
 
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