finish nail puller deluxe.

   #1  

ArlyA

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
4,913
Location
Houghton MI (the Lake Superior snow belt) USA
Tractor
Polaris Boss 6x6 with pods (tracks) Center actuating lawn mower by Husky
Here is a finish nail puller I put together. Its not my idea, and works like a charm when you have finish nails in old trim or boards and you'd like to pull the nails through, not backwards like most nail pullers. This very much lessens the damage to the wood. That's a little piece of pipe I welded onto the jaw. The pipe was smoothed up so as to scratch less.
P1100373.jpg
 
Last edited:
   #4  

downsizingnow48

Elite Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2013
Messages
2,749
Location
Sacramento, California
Tractor
Kubota B21
I spent some years as a carpenter and contractor. Never owned or used the dedicated nail puller. For that matter never seen anyone use it. My uncle had one in the bottom of a tool box, but I never saw him use it either. I am sure it works fine.

For most situations I use the two tools below. They provide a lot of leverage. Use with a piece of 1/4" plywood to avoid denting the material you are working with, assuming it is worth treating carefully. For big rusty nails you cannot beat a crowbar. I also have a specialized tool for dismantling decks board by board, it is like a 5 foot pipe welded to a claw hammer.

I think the modified vise grips will work really well for a range of situations.


pullers.jpg
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#5  
OP
ArlyA

ArlyA

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
4,913
Location
Houghton MI (the Lake Superior snow belt) USA
Tractor
Polaris Boss 6x6 with pods (tracks) Center actuating lawn mower by Husky
Seem there is some confusion as to that this tool does. This pulls the nails through the board, not backwards like most nail pullers do. This is best for trim nails in old wood or trim, that you'd like to reuse.
 
Last edited:
   #6  

MossRoad

Old Timer
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Messages
51,488
Location
South Bend, Indiana (near)
Tractor
Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
You should check out a crescent 56
I've used those to dismantle large wooden shipping crates. They damage the heck out of the wood if the head is buried. I don't think it would work very well for finish nails pulling them through the backside of trim work like the OP's vice grip tool, since there's no head on that end. But they do work great on sinkers.
 
   #7  

MossRoad

Old Timer
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Messages
51,488
Location
South Bend, Indiana (near)
Tractor
Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
Seem there is some confusion as to that this tool does. This pulls the nails threw the board, not backwards like most nail pullers do. This is best for trim nails in old wood or trim, that you'd like to reuse.
I've usually just used channel locks on the backside to pull finish nails through, but your tool looks like it has a good rocker with that pipe welded to it. (y)
 
   #8  

s219

Super Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
8,567
Location
Virginia USA
Tractor
Kubota L3200, Deere X380, Kubota RTV-X
Channel lock pliers do a great job pulling nails through the backside (or any direction for that matter).
 
   #9  

Diggin It

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
10,602
Location
Three Posts A Day. Or less.
Tractor
LS MT125 TLBM
Seem there is some confusion as to that this tool does. This pulls the nails through the board, not backwards like most nail pullers do. This is best for trim nails in old wood or trim, that you'd like to reuse.
No, we understand. I use either vise grips like that or channel locks, but use the larger rounded 'back' edge, opposite of where you welded the pipe.
 

hunt4570

Super Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
5,374
Location
South Carolina
Tractor
Grand L3540 ,724 loader, bucket, grapple and now forks also! And just for OP.. a pool!
Seem there is some confusion as to that this tool does. This pulls the nails through the board, not backwards like most nail pullers do. This is best for trim nails in old wood or trim, that you'd like to reuse.
Same way the blue handled tool in the pic on post #4 does.. Always pull from the backside.
 

Hay Dude

Super Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
9,431
Location
The Corrupt Rust Belt
Tractor
Case-IH MX-270, MF7495, Kubota M135XTDSC, Kubota M126XTDC, Kubota F3680, Kubota ZD331
I use blue handled nail nippers and just pull. If I have to bend the nail, the curved jaw face usually doesn’t damage, but if it’s real delicate, I just pin a wood shim under them to protect wood surface. They are a must have in my tool pouch. They come in different sizes.
 

DaveinValdez

Bronze Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2021
Messages
59
Location
Valdez, Alaska
Tractor
Kubota B2601
Taught Wood Shop for 25 years. I always taught to kids to pull the finish nails through to lessen damage on the good face of the board. Used vice grips, the rounded edge and put a thin scrap piece in between. Almost always worked great.
 

DaveinValdez

Bronze Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2021
Messages
59
Location
Valdez, Alaska
Tractor
Kubota B2601
" Almost always worked great."
Cautious optimism?
or
alternate facts?

LOL, It gave me a good chuckle.

I always considered it good teaching year if i kept the stiches under 12. Managed the entire career maintaining the ability to count to ten! 🖐🖐 Retirement is great!
 

Hay Dude

Super Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
9,431
Location
The Corrupt Rust Belt
Tractor
Case-IH MX-270, MF7495, Kubota M135XTDSC, Kubota M126XTDC, Kubota F3680, Kubota ZD331
Only problem with pulling finish nails through the back is if you have a piece of window/door trim mostly nailed on. Then you have to pull it out the way it went in. Usually a grasp and a twist and it’s out....kinda like a wisdom tooth. Lol
 

MossRoad

Old Timer
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Messages
51,488
Location
South Bend, Indiana (near)
Tractor
Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
Only problem with pulling finish nails through the back is if you have a piece of window/door trim mostly nailed on. Then you have to pull it out the way it went in. Usually a grasp and a twist and it’s out....kinda like a wisdom tooth. Lol
Oooo I've done that a few times. Just a couple nails left in the trim and WHACK!

I've learned over the years I'm more awesome on the demolition crew. :ROFLMAO:
 

downsizingnow48

Elite Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2013
Messages
2,749
Location
Sacramento, California
Tractor
Kubota B21
This is a bit off topic. There were a few times when I wanted to save a piece of trim with an out-dated profile. The alternative might be to spend a few hundred dollars at a local mill for them to grind a matching set of knives and make some new material.

But mostly it does not make sense to pay someone to pull nails so you can put back up a (usually) cracked and (always) paint chipped old piece of wood that is worth about $2.00. Throw away the old stuff and put up new, you will be money and time and quality ahead.
 

lennyzx11

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2015
Messages
1,255
Location
Bennington Vermont
Tractor
Kubota L3301 HST/LA525 & 1964 Ford 2000 gas
This is a bit off topic. There were a few times when I wanted to save a piece of trim with an out-dated profile. The alternative might be to spend a few hundred dollars at a local mill for them to grind a matching set of knives and make some new material.

But mostly it does not make sense to pay someone to pull nails so you can put back up a (usually) cracked and (always) paint chipped old piece of wood that is worth about $2.00. Throw away the old stuff and put up new, you will be money and time and quality ahead.

Even farther off topic.
I usually just cut the nails off on the back side with a pair of side cutters or my cordless angle grinder with a cutoff wheel on it for a whole bunch.
The little stick out (1/8” approximately) works good to “tack” the piece in place holding it while the real nails get driven.

Pulling them through seems to crack the older dry trim for me so I cut them off and leave the head buried in the wood under the original filler done long ago.

To remove the trim, I use a paint scraper/putty knife jabbed down to protect the wall as a backer and a set of thin 90degree trim bars to get started. Like these.
Pry Bar Set (3-Piece)

 

Scar0B2150

Bronze Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
90
Location
SW Wa State
Tractor
Kubota B2150 HSD
We had oak floors in our house. They were "sanded" to refinish them very poorly, before we bought the house. So I ripped them all up and installed a new bamboo floor.
Now to the point. There were several boards that were still in decent shape that I figured would be good for some projects. But there were several 100 nails still in the boards.
So I came up with this.
A cable tie clamp that you screw into a wall to hold phone lines, a small nut, and a rivet gun.
Worked like a charm! No tear out on either side.
Rivet2.jpg


BracketJig.jpg


Pile.jpg

Coffee table made from the flooring.
Photo11030630.jpg


I also made a dining room butterfly table out of it.
 
Last edited:

Diggin It

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
10,602
Location
Three Posts A Day. Or less.
Tractor
LS MT125 TLBM
Taught Wood Shop for 25 years. I always taught to kids to pull the finish nails through to lessen damage on the good face of the board. Used vice grips, the rounded edge and put a thin scrap piece in between. Almost always worked great.

" Almost always worked great."
Cautious optimism?

or
alternate facts?
Straight fact. No twist. Almost because sometimes the nail breaks off. Then you use the grinder or file as mentioned below.
Even farther off topic.
I usually just cut the nails off on the back side with a pair of side cutters or my cordless angle grinder with a cutoff wheel on it for a whole bunch.
The little stick out (1/8” approximately) works good to “tack” the piece in place holding it while the real nails get driven.

Pulling them through seems to crack the older dry trim for me so I cut them off and leave the head buried in the wood under the original filler done long ago.

To remove the trim, I use a paint scraper/putty knife jabbed down to protect the wall as a backer and a set of thin 90degree trim bars to get started.
Yeah, I don't understand the other post about trim. A thin blade or prybar, even the type used for automotive trim gets behind the molding enough to pull it loose from the wall.

Way, way, waaaayyyy off topic. I passed through Valdez in '71 or '72 after they relocated it after the massive 'Quake of '64.
 

mikester

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Messages
1,733
Location
Canada
Tractor
M59 TLB
Taught Wood Shop for 25 years. I always taught to kids to pull the finish nails through to lessen damage on the good face of the board. Used vice grips, the rounded edge and put a thin scrap piece in between. Almost always worked great.
Kinda hard to do when you are air nailing trim and you manage to hit a hidden drywall screw and the finishing nail turns into a coiled up mess on the surface of the trim.
 

MossRoad

Old Timer
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Messages
51,488
Location
South Bend, Indiana (near)
Tractor
Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
We had oak floors in our house. They were "sanded" to refinish them very poorly, before we bought the house. So I ripped them all up and installed a new bamboo floor.
Now to the point. There were several boards that were still in decent shape that I figured would be good for some projects. But there were several 100 nails still in the boards.
So I came up with this.
A cable tie clamp that you screw into a wall to hold phone lines, a small nut, and a rivet gun.
Worked like a charm! No tear out on either side.
View attachment 694839

View attachment 694840

View attachment 694841
Coffee table made from the flooring.
View attachment 694842

I also made a dining room butterfly table out of it.
I wish I could hit the like button multiple times on this post! (y) (y) (y)
 

Hay Dude

Super Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
9,431
Location
The Corrupt Rust Belt
Tractor
Case-IH MX-270, MF7495, Kubota M135XTDSC, Kubota M126XTDC, Kubota F3680, Kubota ZD331
Straight fact. No twist. Almost because sometimes the nail breaks off. Then you use the grinder or file as mentioned below.

Yeah, I don't understand the other post about trim. A thin blade or prybar, even the type used for automotive trim gets behind the molding enough to pull it loose from the wall.

Way, way, waaaayyyy off topic. I passed through Valdez in '71 or '72 after they relocated it after the massive 'Quake of '64.
Why wouldn’t you understand that?
If a finish carpenter is trimming a window, and the molding takes 18 finish nails to apply it to the jamb, who would want to pull the whole piece of trim off with a pry bar, just to pull out one nail through the back, when he could just pull it out from the front?

Using a pry bar to pull it off is a lot more work and risks breaking the trim.
I framed and trimmed 100s of houses and would never pull an entire piece of trim off just to pull a nail through the back-even if it only had 2 nails in it.

Back in the day, you’d be fired as a finish carpenter for removing trim, just to pull a nail from the backside. It would take an extra 1/2 hour and risk breaking the trim.
 
Last edited:

PILOON

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
10,864
Location
North of Mtl,Que,Can (Ste Adele)
Tractor
MT180D
I re ground a pair of end cutters so that they cut nails flush to the backside of the trim.
End vs side cutters as it is easy to first try pulling B4 cutting as a last resort.
A slight rocking motion of the end cutters usually gets things going but failing to do so you simply reposition and 'clip the nail flush'.

For straight pulling a good pair of vice grips works just OK on soft wood trim.
 

EddieWalker

Epic Contributor
Joined
May 26, 2003
Messages
23,523
Location
Tyler, Texas
Tractor
Several, all used and abused.
Nice idea for a nail puller. I use needle nose pliers. Most of the time, I spin the nails out by gripping what's exposed and turning the pliers so the nail bends. It usually comes out right away, but sometimes I use the leverage from the length of the pliers to pull them out.

As a remodel contractor, I'm constantly removing trim from a house and its not uncommon for there to be over a dozen nails in a single piece of door trim. I haven't found anything faster or easier then needle nose pliers.

Sometimes the nail breaks off. I just bend it over and make it flush, or break it off close to the wood by twisting what's left back and forth until it breaks off.
 

Zetorboy

New member
Joined
Jan 25, 2020
Messages
15
Tractor
Zetor
He guys! Thi site is'nt it suppose to be a ....tractor subject post site?????
Love those diverst subjects discussed.
Have a great day.
Zetor Boy
 

S H Bishop of Bliss

New member
Joined
Jul 25, 2016
Messages
3
Location
Bliss, Idaho
Tractor
John Deere M, MT, MC, & 430. J I Case 430 & 730
We had oak floors in our house. They were "sanded" to refinish them very poorly, before we bought the house. So I ripped them all up and installed a new bamboo floor.
Now to the point. There were several boards that were still in decent shape that I figured would be good for some projects. But there were several 100 nails still in the boards.
So I came up with this.
A cable tie clamp that you screw into a wall to hold phone lines, a small nut, and a rivet gun.
Worked like a charm! No tear out on either side.
View attachment 694839

View attachment 694840

View attachment 694841
Coffee table made from the flooring.
View attachment 694842

I also made a dining room butterfly table out of it.
 

Diggin It

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
10,602
Location
Three Posts A Day. Or less.
Tractor
LS MT125 TLBM
Why wouldn’t you understand that?
If a finish carpenter is trimming a window, and the molding takes 18 finish nails to apply it to the jamb, who would want to pull the whole piece of trim off with a pry bar, just to pull out one nail through the back, when he could just pull it out from the front?
Why would you want to pull just one nail? Unless it bent on the way in, and then it wouldn't take much to pull it back out.
I use needle nose pliers. Most of the time, I spin the nails out by gripping what's exposed and turning the pliers so the nail bends. It usually comes out right away, but sometimes I use the leverage from the length of the pliers to pull them out.


Sometimes the nail breaks off. I just bend it over and make it flush, or break it off close to the wood by twisting what's left back and forth until it breaks off.
I've done that too. Works best with small nails or brad from a pneumatic nailer.

If it breaks off, you hope a nail set will drive it below the surface enough to fill over it.
 

Hay Dude

Super Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
9,431
Location
The Corrupt Rust Belt
Tractor
Case-IH MX-270, MF7495, Kubota M135XTDSC, Kubota M126XTDC, Kubota F3680, Kubota ZD331
Why would you want to pull just one nail? Unless it bent on the way in, and then it wouldn't take much to pull it back out.
We must be disagreeing to agree, because this is so silly simple.
In my example, if I apply a piece of trim to a door or window, and I have a bunch of nails holding it in place, then I bend a nail, why in heck would I remove the entire piece of trim off the window, just so I can pull the nail through the BACK of the piece of trim?
Wouldnt you simply leave the mostly-nailed piece of trim where it is and just yank the bent finish nail out towards you, from the front?
 

S H Bishop of Bliss

New member
Joined
Jul 25, 2016
Messages
3
Location
Bliss, Idaho
Tractor
John Deere M, MT, MC, & 430. J I Case 430 & 730
IMG_0384.jpg


I found out that the next most important thing to the having/using the right tool to pull the nail, is having a way to keep the board immobile, and up where I can work on it. I usually set up some sawhorses, but one time I inherited a trailer load of used lumber, from a person who had mental problems that he solved by driving nails into wood in as many ways as he could. So I built myself a super sawhorse out of 2x6 lumber, with additional pieces to hold it steady while I pulled, yanked, and twisted the nails. I used large F style clamps to secure the boards to the sawhorse. I built a shelve to hold my tools, and I kept a magnet-on-a-stick handy to pickup the nails and screws that got away. Some lumber I was able to salvage for my son-in-law to use for building stage flats for the local theatre he helps out, and the rest I turned into firewood. Of course having a black lab to supervise is always important, even if she sleeps most of the time.
 

Richard

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
4,490
Location
Knoxville, TN
Tractor
International 1066 Full sized JCB Loader/Backhoe and a John Deere 430 to mow with
He used his tractor to bring his tool box to the jobsite.

I thought he was going to use the thumb on his backhoe to pinch the nail and pull it.
 

DaveinValdez

Bronze Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2021
Messages
59
Location
Valdez, Alaska
Tractor
Kubota B2601
Every 6th nail is designed to be imperfect at manufacture to bend in different directions. The tool manufactures pay for this so that "we" will have to buy more than one tool to remove them. It is simple economics.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#35  
OP
ArlyA

ArlyA

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
4,913
Location
Houghton MI (the Lake Superior snow belt) USA
Tractor
Polaris Boss 6x6 with pods (tracks) Center actuating lawn mower by Husky
Nonetheless, this nail puller works like a charm when you have finish nails in old trim or boards and you'd like to pull the nails through, not backwards like most nail pullers do. This very much lessens the damage to the wood. That's a little piece of pipe I welded onto the jaw. This one little tool with make your nail pulling day the best. (not three tools as other folks said they use) :cool:
P1100374.jpg
 

stuckmotor

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2009
Messages
4,737
Location
Lower Up State S.C.
Tractor
AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs
Several years ago Tractor Supply had a similar tool in the bin at the front of the store. The price was very low and I bought one thinking it might work on fencing staples. Don't think I've ever tried it.
 

Richard

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
4,490
Location
Knoxville, TN
Tractor
International 1066 Full sized JCB Loader/Backhoe and a John Deere 430 to mow with
I bought one of these once (large size) Absolutely loved it....so on a whim when I was at the store and they had a set on sale, I bought it (giving me two large, one small and one medium).

Love how this grabs onto a nut or bolt....BUT in keeping with the spirit of this thread, I've found it to be very useful in pulling out nails too. The rounded head simply lets you roll it after you grab the offender. It will pull through the wood (finish nails) or back out (finish or regular)




download.jpg
 

stuckmotor

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2009
Messages
4,737
Location
Lower Up State S.C.
Tractor
AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs
I bought one of these once (large size) Absolutely loved it....so on a whim when I was at the store and they had a set on sale, I bought it (giving me two large, one small and one medium).

Love how this grabs onto a nut or bolt....BUT in keeping with the spirit of this thread, I've found it to be very useful in pulling out nails too. The rounded head simply lets you roll it after you grab the offender. It will pull through the wood (finish nails) or back out (finish or regular)




View attachment 695243
I saw those in the TS store and couldn't figure out what they were for. The one I got was flat black, with long handles, and doesn't lock.
 
Last edited:

Richard

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
4,490
Location
Knoxville, TN
Tractor
International 1066 Full sized JCB Loader/Backhoe and a John Deere 430 to mow with
Of the various vice grips I have.....these are ALWAYS now my first go-to.
 

Richard

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
4,490
Location
Knoxville, TN
Tractor
International 1066 Full sized JCB Loader/Backhoe and a John Deere 430 to mow with
Thought to add... I've used these pulling finish nails (out face and out back) regular nails (ditto), wiring staples that hold wiring to your studs, FLOOR staples back when I used "U" shaped staples for an oak floor. I've used them when I ripped up an old pine floor that had been stapled down and all the staples needed to be removed.

That rounded head really makes them handy to use when pulling something out. To protect the face of things, I'll also put a piece of wood between to help protect the finish.

I've even pulled out what turned out to be old screws (yeah it buggered up the wood but I was probably "de-nailing" it for the burn pile)
 
 
Top