Gas Pressure

DL Meisen

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I understand completely I worked in a industry where one had to be jack of all trades from manual threading 6 inch stationary diesel engine exhaust pipe to splicing fiber optic cable.... And above all you had to use the correct terminology so everybody understood the whole processes and to avoid any confusion... Retired as top title telecommunications technician...
 
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bindian

bindian

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I'm sorry my comment was not intended for you, I am in total agreement with you in principal.... THE comment with graphic was intended for Brandi who insists on using the incorrect term of PSI, Yes, you and I both know the Burdon tube type gauge reads pressure and is calibrated through a orifice and DISPLAYED AS CFH.... So CFH is proper terminology...

Sorry if I ruffled your feathers, it was not my intention at all to disagree with you....
So I ask a question and you say I am insisting? Wow. So CFH is proper terminology...nitpicker. You could have just stated............................crank the regulator up to 20 and let it rip. It's the first gauge I ever used that is CFH and not PSI................and after 28 years as an aircraft mechanic with Southwest Airlines...................I have used a few gauges once or twice.
nohugs, Brandi
 
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bindian

bindian

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Dale, you and I are NOT arguing, I merely added an explanaton of HOW the gauge on the left accomplishes a FLOW indication - "I too set mine at 20 CFH. BTW, that IS a pressure gauge too, but it measures the pressure DROP across an orifice in order to show FLOW rate. Some regulator sets use a rotometer (bb in a tube) to measure flow, either one is fine."

Proof - if I'm wrong, then the "flow" gauge would drop to ZERO when you release the trigger on the MIG gun, right? Try it; once you've released the trigger, the "flow" gauge will actually INCREASE its reading slightly - does NOT usually mean there's a leak...

Brandi, please re-read my earlier post - yes, that gauge (on the left in Dale's picture) reads PRESSURE, 'cause it's a pressure gauge - but it MEASURES the FLOW rate (ONLY when the mig gun is actually WELDING - the gauge on the RIGHT only reads TANK pressure (once you SLOWLY open the tank valve ALL THE WAY)

If either of you needs more info to understand how this works, please ask; my entire career was spent in tech fields, the last 33 years in heavy industrial instrumentation and control, so NOT some "internet expert"... Steve
Steve,
Thanks for all your input. It's still a pressure gauge to me. It just reads differential pressure measured in CFH. Closest thing in aviation is a differential pressure gauge.
hugs, Brandi
 

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Brandi, you got it; I knew your background, we even talked on the phone a few months back - Don't be too hard on Dale, he always tries to help. It may come across as nitpicking, but unless everybody uses the SAME "lingo" on a forum there's too much chance of mis-communication, I'm pretty sure that was his only intent...

BTW, your comment about "crank it up to 20 and let er rip" could conceivably cause some errors ( I know someone with your background will probably be OK, but these forums help OTHERS who might not be "brave enough" yet to ASK their own questions) - the thing is, as I mentioned earlier that "CFH" gauge doesn't tell you true flow UNLESS it's moving gas - so The way I've always done it is to briefly pulse the torch trigger once I get close to the target flow setting, then after a few pulses (and minor tweaks) it'll go right to the 20 mark each time. Most MIGs won't instantly start to feed wire, so if you're quick you usually won't have to clip off excess wire after setting gas flow..

Another handy trick I've found - check out the larger hole in these MIG pliers


That hole has a diagonal cutter, but it's about flush to ONE side of the plier jaws - the recessed side gives a near perfect "stick-out" if you hold the nozzle of the torch against the pliers from that recessed side, then clip the wire. Once you get used to grabbing the pliers the same way, it's noticeably faster than having to "eyeball" the cut each time.

There's a LOT more info to be had, one of the better sites is weldingtipsandtricks.com - if Jody can't weld something, it might just be impossible :=) HTH... Steve
 
  
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bindian

bindian

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That is pretty neat. But after 42 years in aviation, flush sided cutters are preferred to cut safety wire, as the angled cutters leave a sharper point that can snag your arm. I have wore out lots of Snap On pliers (free replacement) over the years. The old Craftsman pliers I go to for welding wire cutting are flush cut, and larger than my wire cutters that handle the safety wire. I got them Christmas 1977 while in A&P School. Over the years, I learned to wrap a finger inside the handles to make the spring action. I am used to cutting the wire to length with them. Experienced pliers, have a certain feel. Over time, you can tell them from someone else's same make and model pliers just by picking them up. Thanks anyway.

Also, when someone replies that I am insisting or otherwise making no sense, others on here will not ask because they will feel ridiculed. "but these forums help OTHERS who might not be "brave enough" yet to ASK their own questions"
hugs, Brandi
 
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DL Meisen

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"Flush cut" pliers are also preferred for plastic ZIP Ties.... Yes as safety issue ... But the end of welding wire it sort of deems it moot when once you strike a arc then tends to end up with a ball end on wire....
 
  
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bindian

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"Flush cut" pliers are also preferred for plastic ZIP Ties.... Yes as safety issue ... But the end of welding wire it sort of deems it moot when once you strike a arc then tends to end up with a ball end on wire....
Yes, it's moot. But you brought it up anyway. Also, in aviation where they have been used for decades and decades, they are called Ty-wraps, not zip ties.
Brandi
 

DL Meisen

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Yes, it's moot. But you brought it up anyway. Also, in aviation where they have been used for decades and decades, they are called Ty-wraps, not zip ties.
Brandi
Careful here because TY-WRAP is a bastardization of TY-RAP which is a product/brand of plastic wire ties or cable tie made and sold by Thomas & Betts Corporation, and I have probable installed 10,000 of them over my career....It just so happen the car group I hangout with prefers the bastardization of "ZIP-TIE" because of the sound it makes when pulled tight...
 

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bindian

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Careful here because TY-WRAP is a bastardization of TY-RAP which is a product/brand of plastic wire ties or cable tie made and sold by Thomas & Betts Corporation, and I have probable installed 10,000 of them over my career....It just so happen the car group I hangout with prefers the bastardization of "ZIP-TIE" because of the sound it makes when pulled tight...
Oh please forgive me for misspelling the word. I was trying to go by what you said in post #11.

I am so proud of you installing "probably" 10,000 over your career. I probably dyked 10,000 in my career and installed way more than that. Sometimes standing on my head, upside down in an open cockpit biplane, having to hold the TY-Raps in my mouth.

History lesson for you and your car group, please have them go here to get schooled on how Ty-Raps started in avaition..........https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_tie
Bet you didn't insist your car group use the right terminology (or even spelling) like you are trying to do here.
Brandi
 
 
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