Golf cart charging

   #1  

rbstern

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I've got a 2014 EZGO RXV (48 volt DC-to-AC golf cart). Have owned it since 2019. It came with 4x12v Crown batteries, 2017 mfr date and an EZGO branded 48V digital charger.

The batteries have just about had it. I try to be good about keeping them watered, but these batteries and this charger boil off water like nobody's business. Stain the garage floor with acid, too. Seems like I am constanty going through gallon jugs of distilled water.

Before I plunk down nearly $800 on another set of Crowns, or Trojans, wondering if I should rework how I charge the batteries. Maybe it would pay to invest in a 4 bank smart charger, and wire each battery for individual charging. Usually charge overnight. Could easily live with a 5A per bank rate. Cart gets lightly used a few times a week, mostly on the weekends. Every once in a while it will have a hard day's workload (some longer trips or towing a heavily loaded yard trailer). When the batteries are in better shape, it gets more use. With the current setup, I frequently don't let the full charge cycle run, cause I don't trust that damn 48V charger.

Any comments from experience or suggestions appreciated.
 
   #2  

/pine

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I suggest navigating over to buggiesgonewild.com...they are experts on different battery packs and chargers...they also know how to get the most from their batteries...be sure to read everything the member "scottyb" has about batteries...a great tutorial on breaking in a new pack and proper charging practices...

Also see the 'EZGo Electric' forum for specific issues on your cart...

FWIW...I am using a set of Crowns that are 6.5 years old and still take a full charge...after following the advice I referenced above...

Good Luck...
 
   #3  

Grumpycat

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I think if you have water/acid on the floor then the charger is over-charging.

Put a voltmeter on the individual batteries. Should not go over 14.5V when charging.
 
   #4  

4get gto

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I think if you have water/acid on the floor then the charger is over-charging.

Put a voltmeter on the individual batteries. Should not go over

Charging golf cart batteries are an all different animal.
When charging 6/8volt batteries its not uncommon to see upwards of 60+ volts..
14.5V when charging.
 
   #5  

RjCorazza

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I don't know how newer oem chargers are, but the old 36v transformer chargers were horrible on batteries.
I have used an on board charger for 10 years that has been great on batteries. It's a Delta QuiQ with 10 (?) Installed charge profiles from various battery manufacturers.
 
   #6  

Grumpycat

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Charging golf cart batteries are an all different animal.
When charging 6/8volt batteries its not uncommon to see upwards of 60+ volts..
15.5V is permissible for short periods on nominal 12V lead-acid batteries whether "golf cart" or "deep cycle" or "starter" designs. 60V would quickly destroy a 6V, 8V, or 12V battery.

The O.P. has (4) 12V batteries for which 15.5V x 4 = 62V.

My instruction was to check each battery for 14.5V which is the most one should see if the battery is nearly charged. 13.0V is where a maintainer would hold.

Is important to check at each battery because one weak battery can shed voltage to the others, resulting in boiling of the electrolyte, which is what the O.P. has observed with "water on the floor."

Finally because these are wet lead-acid a battery hydrometer is a useful diagnostic tool. Just as measuring voltage on each battery in series helps isolate problems, the specific gravity of the electrolyte in each of the 6 cells per battery will indicate the relative health of the battery. Much the same as a compression check on an engine to identify a bad cylinder. The hydrometer can measure the SOC (State Of Charge) of the cell. If charger is still trying to push a charge but the SOC is nearly full, then the charger is doing something wrong.
 
   #7  

CobyRupert

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….but fundamentally, is there any problem with using 4 smart chargers simultaneously, one on each battery? I wouldn’t think so, but maybe I’m missing something.
Seems like it might prevent overcharging.
 
   #8  

ronjhall

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I have used Battery Saver Charger/Maintainer for years on my Golf Cart. First set of Batteries lasted 12 years. Second set still tested good when I sold it last March. They were 7 years old. Very seldom needed to add water to them. For a quick charge I used the OEM charger.
 

ponytug

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You could even get used Nissan Leaf batteries (48V).

All the best,

Peter
 
 
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