Got a new grapple that is a year old. Still crated. Condensation in lines?

   #1  

Hersheyfarm

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Before hooking the lines up to my machine I took the hydro lines off to make sure there was no water or anything in them. The lines coming from the part of the cylinders that were open/extended had a few drops worth. This was shipped dry. Now I did open and close the cylinder by hand by lifting the grapples up several times after greasing. I wonder if by doing this I created a little condensation in the closed system. Amount of water was drops, and when blowing air through you could see a little fog blowing out. This is the first time I’ve bought equipment with dry hydraulics. Usually the dealer hooks up to equipment during prep. 352761AA-6699-4361-8FFF-4C4E7F0BB0F5.jpeg02B848D2-D44F-48CD-8865-7DCB1F74524E.jpeg
 
   #2  

oosik

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Whatever - it's not a whole lot of moisture. This is what will happen when you finally connect it up. Hydraulic oil will fill the hoses. Check to see if you have to top up the hydraulic tank.

If there is water/moisture in the hoses - it will be flushed to the hydraulic tank/reservoir. Using the unit will heat up the hydraulic oil and whatever water/moisture will be evaporated off.

BTW - nice looking grapple.
 
  
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#4  
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Hersheyfarm

Hersheyfarm

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I wonder how much condensation gets into equipment? Some mornings in the barn everything metal is just dripping with water. Probably why rarely started equipment is considered severe duty by some manufacturers because of water intrusion and not getting up to running temp often.
 
   #5  

k0ua

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Every time you raise your FEL (Front End Loader) arms, moisture is sucked into the tank (your transmission reservoir) from the outside air. If the transmission is cold that water vapor will condense into water drops. As the transmission heats up that water will be expelled back out the vent as water vapor.

If you only operate your tractor when it is cold, as in just a few minutes at a time, water will accumulate over time in your hydraulic system tank. Tractor hydraulic systems are not really closed systems. They are always sucking in and expelling large amounts of moisture and dust laden air. Nice to know, huh?
 
   #6  

Midniteoyl

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Might not have been condensation but a little oil left over from function testing the cylinder.
 
   #7  

BeezFun

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Single acting cylinders condense moisture in the end of the cylinder that never sees oil. That's why it's better to store them in the position that makes that volume as small as possible.
 
  
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Hersheyfarm

Hersheyfarm

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Single acting cylinders condense moisture in the end of the cylinder that never sees oil. That's why it's better to store them in the position that makes that volume as small as possible.
Good point. I can see water blow out cylinder vent when lowering my bush hog sometimes. I store it in the up position.
 
   #9  

LittleBill21

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worrying about a teaspoon of water, in multi gallons of hydro, is a waste of time, it effects nothing.
 
 
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