Gravel for Driveway...

   #1  

JDGreenGrass

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Should I use 1" or 2" or 3" gravel to get my driveway up to grade.??

Thanks.
 
   #2  

Gary Fowler

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Jun 23, 2008
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Bismarck Arkansas
lI would use a crushed stone rather than gravel. Gravel never really locks together like crushed rock does. I used SB 2 for my drive and it has fines and large rocks up to 3/4". It grades out nice and hardens up nice. I had a firm well drained areal
 
   #3  

gregsons

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Jul 30, 2009
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new york
This is what i do, deliver stone for driveways, Yes you want # 1 or 2 crusher run Ez to grade and packs down tight after a rain, the best way to gom, a 4 inch # 2 base and then 2 inch #1 topcoat. Welll thats the way to go in the north east.
 
   #4  

patrick_g

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South Central OK
All good advice so far but there are more good options.

Definition of terms:

Many folks call crushed limestone gravel. Natural gravel has smooth edges from previous water tumbling action and is NOT the best choice for a firm weatherproof driveway.

Crusher run is crushed rock and contains all sizes down to dust from the size specified on down. It has been screened to remove larger chunks than specified.

Do not use washed (septic) gravel as there are no fines and it is a waste of $.

Shale is a good alternative to crushed limestone. It typically is delivered in larger pieces but even light traffic quickly breaks it down. It ends up looking like blacktop consistency wise but in an attractive blue-grey color. It has less of a dust problem than crusher run limestone. It is lighter per volume so cheaper to haul. I use both but prefer shale, especially near the house.

Pat
 
  
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#5  
OP
JDGreenGrass

JDGreenGrass

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Recycled asphalt is what is on the drive now. It has broken down over the years and I was a bit muddy last spring......so, I am looking to bring it up to grade and add a mild slope for better run-off.

The other thing is I am not looking to do my entire driveway at this point. Just a couple of sections that "need" to be done.

Will 1" gravel get me through winter and spring.??
 
   #6  

veresjwv

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May 31, 2009
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Piedmont Area, NC
All good advice so far but there are more good options.

Definition of terms:

Many folks call crushed limestone gravel. Natural gravel has smooth edges from previous water tumbling action and is NOT the best choice for a firm weatherproof driveway.

Crusher run is crushed rock and contains all sizes down to dust from the size specified on down. It has been screened to remove larger chunks than specified.

Do not use washed (septic) gravel as there are no fines and it is a waste of $.

Shale is a good alternative to crushed limestone. It typically is delivered in larger pieces but even light traffic quickly breaks it down. It ends up looking like blacktop consistency wise but in an attractive blue-grey color. It has less of a dust problem than crusher run limestone. It is lighter per volume so cheaper to haul. I use both but prefer shale, especially near the house.

Pat

Great info, is shale specific to certain areas of the country? I am somewhat new to North Carolina and shale sounds perfect for me. Would most rock quarry's handle it or is it shipped from somewhere?
 
   #7  

radioman

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Ontario, NY
Recycled asphalt is what is on the drive now. It has broken down over the years and I was a bit muddy last spring......so, I am looking to bring it up to grade and add a mild slope for better run-off.

The other thing is I am not looking to do my entire driveway at this point. Just a couple of sections that "need" to be done.

Will 1" gravel get me through winter and spring.??

My neighbor has a 600 foot driveway along side of my lot. There was one year he was having issues so he ordered soft rock (shale) that was basically 2 inch in size. he put that down and drove all summer long and everytime he drives on it, over time the soft rock breaks down into smaller peices simalar to crusher run. This went became a very hard packed driveway and he havent added anything since. I think you need to call around to your local quarrys and see if you can find stones that breaks easily from driving on it. (FYI it kinda noisy to drive on but over time it will stop completely when it becomes hardpacked)
 
   #8  

amigauser

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Oct 11, 2005
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Unionville, Connecticut USA
We use something similar to "crusher run" here in Connecticut for driveways. It is called process gravel. The most common being 3/4 process which has crushed rocks from 3/4 inches down to dust mixed together. It locks together well after grading it and then driving over it to pack it down.
 
   #9  

Charles Billings

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Apr 12, 2008
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Vermont
I live on a private road and have a 1/4 mile drive way off that. There are many problems that arise here in the northeast, and they only seem to be getting worse. The worst problems occur when it thaws in the spring and during heavy rain storms in the summer. Summer storms wash away whole town roadways here, not just private drives.

Over the last 20 years I have tried everything from very course gravel pit deliveries, to crushed stone, and to finely crushed shale. Nothing is fool proof. Too small, which can grade and pack very well like the shale, will be washed away with even a modest storm. Too course, and it will not grade well, and traffic will form deep ruts that eventually just move the stone off to the side. It is always a balance between your terrain, your traffic and Mother Nature. At least here in Vermont the best you can achieve in a hilly terrain is the heaviest crushed stone mix that will grade and pack well. I have found this to be similar to the coarser grade of underlayment that pavers put down before they pave.

Regardless, expect yearly maintenance. Most importantly, keep the road graded and ditched so the water will run off to the side rather than tearing down the middle, and so the tires will not keep jigging or rutting it deeper.
 
Last edited:

ctgoldwing

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Jun 3, 2009
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Central Connecticut
We use something similar to "crusher run" here in Connecticut for driveways. It is called process gravel. The most common being 3/4 process which has crushed rocks from 3/4 inches down to dust mixed together. It locks together well after grading it and then driving over it to pack it down.

I just spread ~50 tons of this on my driveway & proabably need 1 more load (~abt 24.5 tons). When compacted it is a very hard surface. My driveway has a steep grade so one thing I'm trying to do is give it enough pitch that water runs off the sides, not straught down eroding everything. This material ran me $11/ton plus delivery ($90). I really wish I had a box blade to smooth it out well.
 
 
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