Homemade, prefab, concrete and pine post

   #1  

rbstern

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Prefab pole barn posts with a concrete base seem to be gaining in popularity (see image below for reference).

With building material so scarce and prices so high right now, I've delayed my pole barn build. It's not a must have, so it can wait. But I'm also thinking I could use the delay time productively, and cut my own posts on my saw mill. The issue for use in a build, obviously: Not treated lumber.

I was thinking of cutting 6" true posts, drilling the base of the pine vertically for a piece of 1/2" x 4' rebar, leaving 3' of the rebar exposed. Then, I would attach a concrete pouring form, 6"x6"x42", to the bottom of the post and pour in standard, 4000psi Quikcreate or Sakcrete. The rebar would be center-suspended in that mix and provide both lateral and vertical adhesion between the concrete and the post, and keep the pine off the ground when placed in the post hole.

Thoughts? Any reason that can't work?



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   #4  

MossRoad

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...

I was thinking of cutting 6" true posts, drilling the base of the pine vertically for a piece of 1/2" x 4' rebar, leaving 3' of the rebar exposed. Then, I would attach a concrete pouring form, 6"x6"x42", to the bottom of the post and pour in standard, 4000psi Quikcreate or Sakcrete. The rebar would be center-suspended in that mix and provide both lateral and vertical adhesion between the concrete and the post, and keep the pine off the ground when placed in the post hole.

Thoughts? Any reason that can't work?
How would that provide any vertical adhesion? It would keep the post form sliding horizontally, but what would keep it from lifting off the rebar?
 
  
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rbstern

rbstern

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What is your thought with the rebar?

What is it's purpose?

Threefold:

Resist lateral loads
Resist vertical loads (the rebar is hammered in snugly, with some construction adhesive in the hole)
Reinforce the concrete
 
  
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rbstern

rbstern

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Why not just use something like this sturdi wall plus?

View attachment 702149

Budget build.

For the price of one of those, I'm 85% of the way to a 16' 6x6 PT post, or halfway to the cost of a 20' 6x6 PT post, which I can use in a traditional, in-ground install, and the barn will likely last longer than I will.

I do love the looks of those, though.
 
  
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rbstern

rbstern

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How would that provide any vertical adhesion? It would keep the post form sliding horizontally, but what would keep it from lifting off the rebar?

If you've ever hammered 1/2" rebar into a 1/2" hole (with a sledgehammer)...it takes a lot of force to drive in. Would also add adhesive to the hole.
 
   #8  

MossRoad

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Threefold:

Resist lateral loads
Resist vertical loads (the rebar is hammered in snugly, with some construction adhesive in the hole)
Reinforce the concrete
I'd be very surprised if rebar pounded into a wooden hole with adhesive were an accepted practice by code because the load pulls with the grain, not across it like bolts through brackets. Think about it. If you drive a nail into end grain, it is very easy to remove. If you drive it across the grain, it is less easy to remove. Maybe it's acceptable? I do not know. I think I'd use the brackets. They add more strength.

 
   #9  

MossRoad

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Budget build.

For the price of one of those, I'm 85% of the way to a 16' 6x6 PT post, or halfway to the cost of a 20' 6x6 PT post, which I can use in a traditional, in-ground install, and the barn will likely last longer than I will.

I do love the looks of those, though.
Budget build still requires sound practices.

I built a 24 x 24 garage addition last summer. After getting quotes for $6K on concrete I did it myself for half. Lumber, siding, roofing, fasteners etc., were $5K and I did all that myself as well. It was a budget build. I still had to follow code and sound building practices. Some things you can't skimp on.

It might be 'good enough'. I wouldn't do it.
 

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I did it the other way around. Set the rebar into the concrete first and let it set a few days. Then drilled the posts and lifted them into place. Used a smaller piece of steel strapping as brackets.

These were only 4 x 4 x 8 posts though and it's only for a shed roof/awning. And I only came an inch or s above ground. And I don't have any codes, permits or inspections to deal with.
 
 
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