How do they make several different HP tractors with all the other specs being the same?

   #1  

SmallChange

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New Holland WM25 with 200LC front end loader, filled R4 tires 43X16.00-20 and 25X8.50-14 (had a Kubota B6200D with dozer and R1 tires)
Browsing the product line sold at my friendly nearby dealer, I notice that different models are in subgroups of about three that are exactly the same in every specification except horsepower. For example there are 92, 100 and 112 horsepower versions, whose weights and dimensions and engine displacements and RPMs and transmission options and hydraulic capacities and... well, every number in the table of specifications, are exactly the same. Then there might also be fairly similar 80, 72 and 65 horsepower versions that are smaller and lighter and have other specifications that are generally lesser, but those three will also be identical to each other.

How do they do this? What are they actually changing? Are they grinding the camshafts differently? Some engine control electronic settings that are fiddled with?

Are the most powerful horsepower models in each of these subranges less reliable because they stress all the same components more?

Are the least powerful horsepower models in each of these subranges hobbled in some way?
 
   #3  

LD1

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It's all tuning.

It really isn't cost effective to have three totally different tractors to hit 3 HP requirements.
 
   #4  

Hay Dude

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I have (2) Kubota tractors as you describe. Physical dimensions exactly the same.
The only things that are different are the decals (M126x and M135x) and the fuel pump settings.
Manufacturers aren’t going to produce a physically different tractor for each step in horsepower.
 
   #5  

Agvg

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You can have differences with pistons cooling, more HD radiator and etc, particular if the higher HP have a turbo.
 
   #6  

Sawyer Rob

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I have two tractors that appear to be the same, other than tires and HP...

But with a closer look, I noticed there are some internal differences, like the higher HP tractor has a bigger clutch.

SR
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#8  
OP
S

SmallChange

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New Holland WM25 with 200LC front end loader, filled R4 tires 43X16.00-20 and 25X8.50-14 (had a Kubota B6200D with dozer and R1 tires)
It's all tuning.

It really isn't cost effective to have three totally different tractors to hit 3 HP requirements.
Yeah, I was wondering this. And now you're going to find out why I will never have a career in marketing.

I'm totally out of step with this one. I mean, I'm sure you're correct, but I think they're wrongheaded in their strategy.

The highest HP tractor will hit all 3 HP requirements. Too much power is never, itself, a problem.

Less HP is generally something you accept because you need a smaller or lighter machine -- which is fine, because a small light machine can't use huge power anyhow.

So what they are doing here, for all but the highest HP model, is building more machine than the customer needs, and dialing it back, and probably getting a bit less money for it.

For that matter, it's less cost effective to have dealers stocking more models when one would have satisfied all the needs.

It's like the computers they were selling maybe 20 or 25 years ago in which parts of the microprocessor were disabled. They didn't cost makers any less to make, but the makers sold them for less.

I don't get it.

But then, if you put me in charge of selling raisins, I'd make rabbit-shaped dispensers, and have you lift the tail to have a delicious raisin dropped in your palm.

Guess I need to stick to my day job.
 
   #9  

MechanicalGuy

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Yeah, I was wondering this. And now you're going to find out why I will never have a career in marketing.

I'm totally out of step with this one. I mean, I'm sure you're correct, but I think they're wrongheaded in their strategy.

The highest HP tractor will hit all 3 HP requirements. Too much power is never, itself, a problem.

Less HP is generally something you accept because you need a smaller or lighter machine -- which is fine, because a small light machine can't use huge power anyhow.

So what they are doing here, for all but the highest HP model, is building more machine than the customer needs, and dialing it back, and probably getting a bit less money for it.

For that matter, it's less cost effective to have dealers stocking more models when one would have satisfied all the needs.

It's like the computers they were selling maybe 20 or 25 years ago in which parts of the microprocessor were disabled. They didn't cost makers any less to make, but the makers sold them for less.

I don't get it.

But then, if you put me in charge of selling raisins, I'd make rabbit-shaped dispensers, and have you lift the tail to have a delicious raisin dropped in your palm.

Guess I need to stick to my day job.
They are only working within what our government has created as a framework in regards to horsepower and emissions compliance.
 

jaxs

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92, 100 and 112 horsepower isn't that much difference and easily be the result of different components manufactured by different suppliers to different plants. I seriously doubt they intentionaly detune some models simply to say they added a model to their line. The same thing can be seen in tractors from over 50 years ago. For instance Ford's 600 and 800 series have only used 2 cid engines but hp ratings are all over the place and all but a few replacement parts are same stock #s accross both lines. Speaking of hp ratings and old tractors,I have a MF65 rated at 45 hp that will out pull my 841 Ford rated at 62 hp. Now that's worth chewing the rag over amoungest brand faitful owners.
 
 
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