How to make asphalt millings smooth and nice black colour?

   #1  

summit151

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Jul 22, 2014
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Drayton Valley Alberta
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Massey 1135
I recently installed some millings on the side of my drive way to park my camper on. I am wondering what the best way to make the surface smooth and add some black colour? Have heard a lot of different ways…. With mixed comments and reviewes


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   #4  

oosik

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Aug 22, 2012
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AMBER, WA
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2009 Kubota M6040
summit151 - are those millings already starting to track into your house? I see them on the cement and in the clean-off grating in pic #2. Getting them rolled good and tight will probably eliminate this.
 
   #5  

Egon

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Spray on some real tackcote ( not the hardware type ) and then use a vibrating roller to pack it. Keep the roller wet. When finished cover it with sand and pack again. It will turn black after a year or so.
 
   #6  
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Jun 7, 2021
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Rolling hills north of historic Leesburg, VA
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Kubota B3200, L2550, Ingersoll 7020, 2 walk behind Gravely's and a Yanmar Vi0-45 mini-ex
Egon suggests sand. I'm guessing that is to serve as packing material - to lock the millings together. Fines would be better, as the particles would be larger and the irregularity of the fine would help to lock the particles together - unlike sand which would stay loose. Also consider ground black coal slag. It's black and is fractured, and would have the irregular profile of fines - the better to lock together. I don't know if the largest size - medium - is large enough to do you any good. Ask for a sample

 
   #7  

Egon

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Egon suggests sand. I'm guessing that is to serve as packing material - to lock the millings together. Fines would be better, as the particles would be larger and the irregularity of the fine would help to lock the particles together - unlike sand which would stay loose. Also consider ground black coal slag. It's black and is fractured, and would have the irregular profile of fines - the better to lock together. I don't know if the largest size - medium - is large enough to do you any good. Ask for a sample

Sand is a generic tern for small sizes of rock. Grading depends on how well the particulate sizes are distributed.
It’s use will help keep the tackcote from tracking. Over time the tackcote will get hard and dry and the sand just blends into the topcoat.
 
 
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