Liquid filled tires

  
  • Thread Starter
#11  
OP
C

chander

Silver Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
113
Location
Chatsworth, NJ
Tractor
Ford 1710, 1910, 2120
I believe my next step will be to remove some fluid so I can at least check the air pressure.
The tractor was jacked up on a level pad with the tire stems at the 12 o'clock position. I have checked these tires for many years with out this happening.
I don't know either if calcium expands in volume with temperature change. This just had me scratching my head, this is the reason I posted here.
 
   #12  

bmaverick

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
2,951
Location
Beloit-WI
Tractor
Yanmar YM2610, retired JD 850, retired DYT-4000
I believe my next step will be to remove some fluid so I can at least check the air pressure.
The tractor was jacked up on a level pad with the tire stems at the 12 o'clock position. I have checked these tires for many years with out this happening.
I don't know either if calcium expands in volume with temperature change. This just had me scratching my head, this is the reason I posted here.

Glad you posted. We can all learn from experiences too. :)
 

Surshot

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
40
Location
NW Florida
Tractor
Kubota L4400 4x4
So for mowing with the industrial tread rear tires should be about 20 psi at about a 70% fill with liquid for 100% ground contact? I use a 6’ Bush Hog, bush hog for a counter balance on my L4400 4x4 standard transmission tractor.

I have tree farm so do not do plowing or disking. But I do a good bit of downed tree pickup with a heavy root rake with two piston grapple, so keep my front wheels at 40-45 psi, just to keep the tires on the rims at a turn.
 

LouNY

Super Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2015
Messages
7,706
Location
Greenwich, NY
Tractor
Branson 8050, IH 574, Oliver 1550 Diesel Utility (traded in on Branson)
Normally the volume of calcium will not change.
Guessing I'd say your pressure is lower then it used to be.
Most rear tractor tires will not look low even when down to 12-15 PSI
Mine are not liquid filled but are carrying 600#s of iron on each side with 15PSI in them.
 

Surshot

Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2008
Messages
40
Location
NW Florida
Tractor
Kubota L4400 4x4
My tractor tire company owner died of C-19. So his guys replaced my tires, filled them to 100%,right up to the top, then blew them up to 32 psi. They loaded the tractor on my trailer, when I backed it off, I knew something was way wrong.

So I have been adjusting a little at a time to get the ride right or back where it was before they fixed it.
 

jyoutz

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2000
Messages
3,659
Location
Edgewood, New Mexico
Tractor
Kubota MX6000
I've not heard of rear tube tires filled with fluid before. But, if it works, then fine.

Since the late 80s, the calcium chloride fill has dropped in popularity for either the beet juice fill or the RV/Marine propylene glycol (pink stuff) as it will not corrode the rims nor the cheap valve stems. Also protects the inside of the tire wall and the metal rim. Helps reduce rim leaks too. Has protection in -40F temps and can be used all year.

Additionally, the RV/Marine pink stuff is pet safe, kid safe, and even approved as a food sweetener by the FDA in gummy bears, Swedish fish, lots of salad dressings, salsas, etc. That's what organic farms use too in their machines.

Back to your question. What is making the CC leak out? A chemical reaction? Filling more air increases the pressure. Maybe the tube rotted out inside?
There is a new non corrosive, non toxic liquid fill alternative. The dealer installed this in my tires.

 

Fallon

Super Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Messages
6,554
Location
Parker, CO
Tractor
Kubota L4060hstc, formerly L3200hst
There is a new non corrosive, non toxic liquid fill alternative. The dealer installed this in my tires.

The slightly more common one is beet juice. Usually sold under the name Rim Guard. Bio Ballast is some byproduct of some food something, but supposedly not beet juice. Either are way better than calcium. Alcohol (windo washer fluid) is lighter per gallon & has the low freezing point, but is pretty cheap.

Used automotive anti-freeze is cheap but even more toxic than calcium.

My dealer sells bio ballast so that's what I have. Works well.
 

jyoutz

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2000
Messages
3,659
Location
Edgewood, New Mexico
Tractor
Kubota MX6000
The slightly more common one is beet juice. Usually sold under the name Rim Guard. Bio Ballast is some byproduct of some food something, but supposedly not beet juice. Either are way better than calcium. Alcohol (windo washer fluid) is lighter per gallon & has the low freezing point, but is pretty cheap.

Used automotive anti-freeze is cheap but even more toxic than calcium.

My dealer sells bio ballast so that's what I have. Works well.
My dealer said corn, but hard to tell. The manufacturer just says organic content.
 

ROUSTABOUT

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
1,203
Location
Luther Willis Hill, AR
Tractor
Pettibone, Ford, Massey Ferguson, International, JD, David Bradley, home mades
Every off road tire we have has tubes and fluid. Somewhere near 50-100 tires. We use water, anti freeze.
 
 
Top