Maintenance of the Power Sweeper.

   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #1  

smartguyz

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Messages
488
Location
Beaverton, Oregon
Tractor
JD318, Power-Trac PT425 with scuffed-up green paint.
Hi gang,

As many of you know, I purchased the 48" Power Sweeper for my 425. It does an outstanding job clearing the courtyard, the access road, and the long drive. It cleans the roadway in a fraction of the time it used to take with brooms and pressure washers. It has made my cleanup time (especially after moving a load of bark mulch) a breeze. I believe it will even work well in light snowfalls. We'll see.

The problem is, PT doesn't see fit to offer or ship any kind of stand for the Power Sweeper. This is problematic, as the Power Sweeper is much too heavy to simply let sit on it's nylon bristles (or wafflers). I would guess the weight to be several hundred pounds. I'd been meaning to rig something up for it to rest on, but never got around to it. I spun the brush up the other day to do some cleaning of the road, and one part of the brush was really matted down - right where it has been sitting. It was kind of weird, with the brush only being 80% effective. Anyway, I called Terry and PT and asked him about it, and after a quick chat with the engineers, he agreed that I should never leave the sweeper on its bristles (although they have no instructions for the brush, and no recommendations - like written maintenance instructions... I just discovered a zerk fitting on the outer bearing(!)). He recommended I rig up a stand for it, and he mentioned they would consider making a change to the sweeper so that it would have some kind of self-storing stand.

Anyway, I went to the basement, and spent about 2 hours with the hair dryer and some gloves, separating the matted portions, and using the hair dryer to heat up the bristles and push them back to their correct positions. It was a lot of work, but I pretty much have it back to normal. I have ended up using a couple of sturdy jack stands from my car tools to hold up the axle of the brush - so now it is resting on the caster wheels and the jack stands - this keeps the bristles off the ground, and the weight off the bristles. I believe another solution would be to keep it on the PT, and just angle it up and back, and then allow the arms to stay in the float position for storage. It appears that there is enough pressure in the angle cylinder to keep the bristles from touching the ground during storage, although I have not tested this long-term.

Just thought I'd pass it along to anyone who might need to know. Frankly, I'd be pretty happy if PT could engineer a couple of braces that could flip down to help the Power Sweeper be 'self-storing' when not in use. It would really help things out a bunch. Or, perhaps I'll teach myself to weld and make something up myself.

Merry Christmas, Guys!

Sincerely,

Rob /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 
   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #2  
A couple of heavy duty kick stands could be bolted to it maybe? Then it could rest on the stands and gauge wheels? Or, maybe two hydraulic cylinders, one on each end, with feet. You could use the PT angle cylinder power to connect the jacks, pump them down, then disconnect. Do the reverse at hook up time. Or some type of steel cradle on casters could be fabricated by a local welder pretty economically. Just pull up to the cradle, dump the brush and back away. Then roll it out of the way for storage.

Heck, you are already using, a pair of jackstands... Just buy another set for $19.95, put them on a piece of cardboard, arrange them to the proper position, then draw around them on the cardboard with a marker to make a template. Take the stands and the template to the local welder and have then weld a tube or two between them so they are always in the proper position. You could even use 3 or four jackstands and have them weld on some casters for mobility. Should be under a hundred bucks for the entire project.

I don't know, just some thoughts. /forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
 
   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #3  
HI,
YOU MIGHT TRY THIS. A 3 INCH SQUARE TUBING, A LITTLE WIDER THAN THE SWEEPER. ONE END SUPPORTED BY A WALL STUD. THE OTHER END SUPPORTED BY A SIX FOOT 3X3 STEEL TUBING . YOU COULD ALSO MAKE IT SO THAT IT WOULD SWING OVER TO THE WALL FOR OUT OF THE WAY STORAGE. THEN ADD TWO CHAINS HANGING FROM THE TOP BEAM. ADD ONE CHAIN HOOK AT EACH OF THE SWEEPER . YOU SIMPLY DRIVE UP TO ASSEMBLY AND HOOK UP THE CHAINS AND RELEASE THE QUICK ATTACH.DISCONNECT THE HOSES AND BACK OUT. YOU COULD ALSO HANG IT FROM ROOF RAFTERS IF THEY ARE STRONG ENOUGH, OR SUPPORT THEM WITH 4X4 STUDS. HOPE THIS HELPS. GOOD LUCK


J.J.
 
   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #4  
J.J.

TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 
   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #5  
I am old and tired and my eyes are weak, but I will try to oblige.

J.J.
 
   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #6  
Well in that case keep using your caps. At least now we know you are not yelling at us(which caps usually mean). /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

My dad has a hard time seeing things on the screen so I just set his screen to use 800 x 600 and large fonts. Although you get less on the screen at least he doesn't have problems seeing what's on it.
 
   / Maintenance of the Power Sweeper. #7  
Now don't you feel bad telling your elders with tired eyes to stop using caps lock? /forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Hee hee. /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

But seriously, there are some handy features in windows for those with vision problems. Larger fonts, and I once saw a magnifying tool that was pretty cool.
 
 
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