MF 1010 Charging issue

   #1  

SnowHillMan

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
4
Location
Snow Hill, MD
Tractor
David Brown 990, MF 1010
Hello,

I purchased a new battery for my MF 1010 earlier this year. When I tried starting the tractor today, it turned over few times and then clicked. The battery showed 11.8 volts. I jump started it and then checked the voltage across the postive/neg terminals. It showed 12.4. When I rev'ed the engine, it went to 12.6.

Is this a correct voltage? I was thinking it should be closer to 14.5 volts when running/charging. Is that correct?

I did some research and found some discussions on needing to "reset" a voltage regulator after a battery disconnect. This is done by "sparking" a "fld" lead. In checking my wiring on the tractor, it has a voltage "rectifier" with 5 wire coming out of it. In checking a wiring diagram in an operator's manual I have, it shows:

2 wires go to generator
2 wires go to ignition switch
1 wire goes to a charging light in a display.

Does the rectifier need to be "reset" like a regualtor? If so, I'm not sure how to accomplish that on this rectifier.


Any insights are appreciated.

Thanks!


rectifier.jpg
 
   #2  

Agvg

Elite Member
Joined
May 25, 2013
Messages
2,540
Location
Norway
Tractor
Mf135, Ursus C-355, David Brown 995
Never heard anybody need to reset a regulator, what do they mean by sparking and fld?

Does your charge light work as I supposed to?
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#3  
OP
S

SnowHillMan

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
4
Location
Snow Hill, MD
Tractor
David Brown 990, MF 1010
I was a little unclear in the initial post. The voltage regulator isn't getting reset, but you are polarizing the generator via the voltage regulator with the procedure mentioned above.

Here's a link that shows a video of the polarizing process on an old Ford tractor:

youtube.com/watch?v=ROFbX8e-snQ

In researching my issue and tractor more, I found out that I do need to do the above procedure. In fact, I do not have a generator. It's an alternator on my MF1010 "Hydro" with hydrostatic drive. However, it still makes use of a voltage rectifier.

I found a wiring diagram for it and information on the charging system. It shows that the uncontrolled voltage (before it hits the rectifier) should be 25 volts on a MF1010 and 30 volts on a MF1020.

After the voltage regulator, the voltage should be 14.5 plus/minus .5 volts. Amps should read 11-12 for the MF1010 and 16-18 for the MF1020.

The alternator is listed as a GP 8122 for the MF1010 and GP 9153 for the MF1020.

In the General Information section for both the MF1010 and MF1020, it states:

"Both tractors utilize a charging system consisting of an alternator and remotely located regulatory rectifier assembly to maintain correct system voltage and battery charge state whenever the tractor is operating.

The alternator produces alternating current (AC) and features permanently magnetized fields rotating around a stationary stator coil. As the fields are permanently magnetized, no excitation current is necessary to initiate system charging. The alternator is very basic in design as no brushes are required and all rectification and control of output current takes place in the regulatory rectifier. "

I list this out in hopes it helps others.

I am unsure if the voltage light is working. I have seen it come on momentarliy in the past, so I believe it functions in some capacity. It does not come on now, however the battery fails to properly charge.

I will hopefully be checking my unit out later this week and will post more.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#4  
OP
S

SnowHillMan

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
4
Location
Snow Hill, MD
Tractor
David Brown 990, MF 1010
I checked the AC voltage coming out of the alternator and it was right at 25 volts, so that seems fine.

I turned my attention to the rectifier and when I pulled the plug off it, one of the tabs was hanging on by a smidge and then broke off. It is the tab that the red wire conencts to which ties back to the battery by way of the ignition switch. I suspect my problem has been with this piece, slowly loosing connectivity over time.

I'm posting pics of the damaged rectifier and the wiring diagram for the MF1010 Hydrostatic for future reference.

Now, where can I get a replacement rectifier?

20190813_191757.jpg

20190813_190313.jpg
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#5  
OP
S

SnowHillMan

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2012
Messages
4
Location
Snow Hill, MD
Tractor
David Brown 990, MF 1010
Well, I replaced the regulator/rectifier with a model AM101406 rectifier. From the research I did, it is supposed to convert/put out 14.5 DC volts. It was an exact hook up for the existing plug on my MF1010. When I started the tractor, it registered 12.8 when reving the engine.

I was not a happy camper, so I tore down the tractor and traced all the wires. I took out a couple wires that were present for a belly mower that was no longer attached. I removed a safety bypass switch that had been installed to get around safety switches that were not longer working (bad connections). I replaced a couple old, cracked connector plugs with straight through butt connectors, making sure I ran them in the same configuration. I scraped down all the ground wires to make sure there were good connections.

I got everything working properly, including lights, horn and glo-plugs (which had not been working for years). However, when I fired up the tractor, it still showed 12.8 volts at the battery (and at ignition switch) when running high speed.

I did more research and found faulty, new regulators are not that uncommon, so I had another one shipped. I hooked it up today and I am now getting 13 volts at high speed (insert scream here).

The MF1010 manual I ordered indicates the voltage should be 14-15.

The alternator is sending out a steady 25 AC Volts. The conversion to 14.5 DC volts seems to be troublesome.

Unless someone has some new insight, I think I will replace the alternator and regualtor with a new one-wire alterator/regulator combo. I'm not worried about restoration. I just want a working, reliable tractor. I don't think that the recharging 13 volts currently coming though will be enough to properly maintain my battery. I only run the tractor a few times a month.

Any thoughts or ideas are appreciated.

Thanks,
SnowHillMan
 
   #6  

jfraser2065

New member
Joined
Mar 23, 2015
Messages
8
Location
Acworth, GA
Tractor
1986 MF1010
Well, I replaced the regulator/rectifier with a model AM101406 rectifier. From the research I did, it is supposed to convert/put out 14.5 DC volts. It was an exact hook up for the existing plug on my MF1010. When I started the tractor, it registered 12.8 when reving the engine.

I was not a happy camper, so I tore down the tractor and traced all the wires. I took out a couple wires that were present for a belly mower that was no longer attached. I removed a safety bypass switch that had been installed to get around safety switches that were not longer working (bad connections). I replaced a couple old, cracked connector plugs with straight through butt connectors, making sure I ran them in the same configuration. I scraped down all the ground wires to make sure there were good connections.

I got everything working properly, including lights, horn and glo-plugs (which had not been working for years). However, when I fired up the tractor, it still showed 12.8 volts at the battery (and at ignition switch) when running high speed.

I did more research and found faulty, new regulators are not that uncommon, so I had another one shipped. I hooked it up today and I am now getting 13 volts at high speed (insert scream here).

The MF1010 manual I ordered indicates the voltage should be 14-15.

The alternator is sending out a steady 25 AC Volts. The conversion to 14.5 DC volts seems to be troublesome.

Unless someone has some new insight, I think I will replace the alternator and regualtor with a new one-wire alterator/regulator combo. I'm not worried about restoration. I just want a working, reliable tractor. I don't think that the recharging 13 volts currently coming though will be enough to properly maintain my battery. I only run the tractor a few times a month.

Any thoughts or ideas are appreciated.

Thanks,
SnowHillMan
SnowHillMan, I am new to the forum and I realize this is a very old post. I am deep into a full electrical rebuild on my MF1010 and found this thread.
I am wondering how you made out. Hoping to get lucky and learn something from you.
Best,
J
 
   #7  

rScotty

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Messages
4,983
Location
Rural mountains - Colorado
Tractor
Kubota M59, JD530, JD310SG. Restoring Yanmar YM165D
I wondered too. What's missing in SnowHill Man's old message is a description of the voltage output from the regulator at normal running rpm... and without that information we are stymied.

Alternators increase their output linearly with RPM. That's why you have Voltage Regulators; they set the upper limit on charging voltage. VRs tend to be built cheaply and are not all that accurage.

There are many interchangeable alternators and voltage regulators - and each one has a different voltage limiting scheme and different limit.

If SnowHill Man's VR was outputting 13 volts at medium RPM into a lead acid wet cell or AGM battery then all is well.
Not optimal, but certainly OK.
good luck with the MF 1010,
rScotty
 
   #8  

jfraser2065

New member
Joined
Mar 23, 2015
Messages
8
Location
Acworth, GA
Tractor
1986 MF1010
I wondered too. What's missing in SnowHill Man's old message is a description of the voltage output from the regulator at normal running rpm... and without that information we are stymied.

Alternators increase their output linearly with RPM. That's why you have Voltage Regulators; they set the upper limit on charging voltage. VRs tend to be built cheaply and are not all that accurage.

There are many interchangeable alternators and voltage regulators - and each one has a different voltage limiting scheme and different limit.

If SnowHill Man's VR was outputting 13 volts at medium RPM into a lead acid wet cell or AGM battery then all is well.
Not optimal, but certainly OK.
good luck with the MF 1010,
rScotty
Thanks - My mind was on the same thought path.
Was just hoping to tick some test boxes in the process.
The little MF1010 is a fun little rig to work on. No parts too big to handle.
Best,
JF
 
 
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