New tractor owner

   / New tractor owner #21  

Gord Baker

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2016
Messages
259
Location
Carlisle Ontario
Tractor
2355 JD, 4.75 New Holland
Nice Tractor. New Holland? You might consider folding back the top section of the ROPS or having it shortened. If it catches on a low sturdy limb, you are in instant trouble.
 
   / New tractor owner #23  

KennyG

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
3,955
Location
SW Michigan
Tractor
John Deere 2320
I'd be curious to know how one keeps visibility up in a soft cover given as how there is no defrost or wiper
I've had an OTC soft cab for almost 10 years. Not any real need for defrost or wiper. With the optional glass windshield you can add a wiper but I didn't. I do have the glass and it is the way to go.
 
   / New tractor owner #25  

KennyG

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
3,955
Location
SW Michigan
Tractor
John Deere 2320
is that because it's as cold in the shell as outside? so no temp' differential = no condensation?
There's no heater but you pick up engine/transmission heat and there's no wind. You can't work in a T shirt but when it's zero F outside, it's around freezing in the cab. Also, it's not a tight seal, so there is some air circulation. On warmer, high humidity days I see a little condensation, but not enough to be a problem.
 
   / New tractor owner #26  

airbiscuit

Elite Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
4,924
Location
NW Wisconsin
Tractor
New Holland T2310, Kubota L3010 GST, New Holland TC21DA, Farmall H *** Previously - 1941 John Deere B, Shibaura SD1500, John Deere 850, Bobcat 642, New Holland 1925
A snowmobile suit and a helmet works too ;)
 
   / New tractor owner #27  

Mud2Money

Bronze Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2022
Messages
82
Location
Michigans thumb.
Tractor
Lb2202, 63’ 630 COM, MF85, MT573cps
Nice tractor ! Goodworks , sweetstractor, and everything attachments are all places I use for any online orders if my local stores don’t have what I am looking for. As for the securing the load comments I don’t think anyone was trying to be mean. I haul equipment to and from sites for my day job. Dot requires 4 points chained or strapped on the machine it’s self. Any accessories/moving parts of the machine like a dozer blade , excavator boom , loader must also be tied down. They assume it can come up at any point and hit a bridge etc.
 
   / New tractor owner #28  

RolandW

Bronze Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2015
Messages
52
Location
USA Midwest
Tractor
Deere 4320 compact (Ford 5000, RIP)
how much weight do you have on the rear? I run industrial rubbers and I do just fine in heavy snow and ice
I'm using a rear blade, so no extra weight on the rear other than fluid in the tires, and no wheel weights. Of course having the loader attached makes it worse, but even without that the performance is disappointing.
 
   / New tractor owner #29  

rScotty

Super Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Messages
6,473
Location
Rural mountains - Colorado
Tractor
Kubota M59, JD530, JD310SG. Restoring Yanmar YM165D
Man I sure agree on the tires! I went to AG tires on one of my Kubota's of very similar size for snow blowing and it was a huge change. The difference between needing chains vs not needing chains.



Tire preferece discussions seem to go o without end. We've had tractors for over 50 years now and have come to prefer the Industrial treads over the Ag (agriculture or R1) tires.

Yes, in heavy snow or mud or soft plowed ground the Industrial tread does have less bite, but they still have some traction and on dryer soil or hard pack they have more. Most of the work we do all during the year is not in extreme weather conditions. The trade off that counts for us is that industrial treads have better traction much of the time and always do less damage to the land. Industrials don't do so much rutting and tearing of soil and plants, and have slightly better stability due to being a little wider tire.

I do have a set of front chains that can be put on for deaing with deep snow or mud if we need to. They are rarely used, but nice to have. Using the FEL to lift the front up makes them go on easily. In fact, I used them as much with Ag tires as with the Industrials. When chains are needed, the tire tread is sort of secondary.

I'd say to leave the tires you have. They look like good ones. Consider adding a set of front chains if you get a lot of heavy snow or mud or just want to make yours a traction monster.

rScotty
 
   / New tractor owner #30  

Raul-02

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2021
Messages
1,414
Location
the armpit of the entire universe New Jersey
Tractor
kioti DK4710 SE HST CAB
rear blade, so no extra weight on the rear other than fluid in the tires, and no wheel weights.
I can tell you what I have on mine and it seems to do the job.
It's a 4 or 5-hundred-pound 1/4" thick steel wood stove, a rather large one. That I filled with rocks. I should calculate the weight of all that steel and possibly even the rocks could be roughly calculated.
I guess the combined weight of the stove-&-rocks is close to 1500 pounds. I have lifted a log that weighed over 2000 pounds and the rear didn't get light. I use a 6-foot Worksaver snow pusher and I've never felt slippage when pushing or grooming snow piles. I have a 15-Degree grass slope going into the courtyard where I keep my firewood and in snow I navigate that just fine. The tires are whatever industrial tires the factory put on.

Ya gotta know though it's a bigger tractor a 47 HP weighing in at 4000 with out the FEL. So it can handle the big ballast.
 
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