Old dump truck operated by two side cable lifts.

   #1  

bcp

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I've seen old trucks with one winch and post in front center of the bed, and many DIY dump trailers the same.

This is the only one I've seen of this style.

dump-truck-side-cable-1.jpg




dump-truck-side-cable-2.jpg




Bruce
 
   #2  

old and tired

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Ca license plates were issued yearly back then so the "Date Unknown" could be narrowed down to at least 1927!!

Would like to do this to my trailer :thumbsup:
 
   #3  

JethroB

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Interesting. Boy, solid rubber tires on a cobble stone street. No falling asleep at the wheel there. :rolleyes:
 
  
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bcp

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No front brakes. Dump bed pivots about 2/3 back to reduce lifting effort.

Bruce
 
   #5  

orezok

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When I was a kid, (1950's) my dad would borrow an old Mack truck to haul stuff. It wasn't as old the one in the pic. It had the single center cable lift with a huge 2 man crank. It was the noisiest thing I ever rode in and i think it was chain drive!
 
   #6  

Tinhack

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Most cars and trucks of that era didn't have front brakes. Most brakes were mechanical so it would be hard(costly) to implement for the front steering axles. Most cars would barely do about 30mph. Trucks even way less. Speed limits in towns were 10-15mph. Most roads were still being shared with horses and horse-drawn wagons. Hydraulic brakes would only have been used on higher value cars. Most freight went by rail so overland trucks were very rare. Manufacturers only had to get their products to a rail depot.
 
   #8  

2LaneCruzer

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Most cars and trucks of that era didn't have front brakes. Most brakes were mechanical so it would be hard(costly) to implement for the front steering axles. Most cars would barely do about 30mph. Trucks even way less. Speed limits in towns were 10-15mph. Most roads were still being shared with horses and horse-drawn wagons. Hydraulic brakes would only have been used on higher value cars. Most freight went by rail so overland trucks were very rare. Manufacturers only had to get their products to a rail depot.

I believe my '30 Chevy had mechanical brakes both on the front and the rear. It would do at least 55 mph, but it felt like going over Niagara Falls in a barrel. I also believe I recall reading that Chrysler was the first automobile mfg. to install hydraulic brakes, in the late 1920's. Besides mechanical brakes, the body frame was made of wood, and the windows and windshield were plate glass, not modern safety glass. The old king pin front end was worn, and it would shimmy when you hit a bump a certain way. No radio or heater, and a three on the floor non-synchro transmission. Autos have come a long way in the last 100 years; of course I think than old Chevy cost something like $440 new.
 
   #9  

LD48750

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I believe my '30 Chevy had mechanical brakes both on the front and the rear. It would do at least 55 mph, but it felt like going over Niagara Falls in a barrel. I also believe I recall reading that Chrysler was the first automobile mfg. to install hydraulic brakes, in the late 1920's. Besides mechanical brakes, the body frame was made of wood, and the windows and windshield were plate glass, not modern safety glass. The old king pin front end was worn, and it would shimmy when you hit a bump a certain way. No radio or heater, and a three on the floor non-synchro transmission. Autos have come a long way in the last 100 years; of course I think than old Chevy cost something like $440 new.


Today it would cost you more then that to have the radio taken OUT of a new vehicle.
 

PILOON

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Also noticed the front tires closely matched the gap in the rail tracks.
Must have been exciting to make turns.

Kind of reminds me of riding a bicycle in the city when we still had street cars.
LOL, once caught you went where the tram went.(or fell)
 
 
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