Repair ATV Tire With a Bolt?

   #1  

Argonne

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Yesterday I managed to get a railroad spike embedded in an almost new Swamp-Lite on my Rancher. I thought the spike would look good in the nail jar at the local tire shop, so I took it to them. They said they had plenty of experience with ATV tires with big holes, and no method they possessed would fix that tire for long. Faced with shelling out $125 for a new one, I am looking for alternatives.

My hare-brained idea is to dismount the tire, drill the hole so I have 1/4 inch of clear hole, and "bolt" the hole closed using a 1/4-20 carriage bolt, a washer on both the inside and outside, a nut (loctited), and RTV to fill any gaps and pressed between the washers. I would top it off with some slime in the tire. I doubt the bolt head will contact the ground much since the tread is almost new and very deep.

The vast majority of the time I am under 25mph on this thing. I have done excursions to 50mph to get my circulatory system reamed out, but it is rare these days.

Anyone tried this? Any serious reservations? Worst case I figure It will get the vehicle back in service until $125 for a tire gets to the top of the budget list. Best case, it will last for years. I don't take this ride anywhere dangerous or remote, no kids riding it or anything. I thought about doing the math to see how much the hardware will weigh at different speeds, but thankfully, the thought passed.

KIMG0271-picsay.jpg
 
   #2  

TemporaryKubotaOwnerMark

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If you want to experience a nice blowout, carry on.

If not, if it's available, an inner tube would be a good choice.

Otherwise, bite the $125 bullet.
 
   #3  

ovrszd

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I, on the other hand, would have no concern in regards to a blowout. You aren't running extreme pressure so that's not an issue.

I actually think this idea will work. As to the washers, I think you need some rather large flats. Not just your average 1/4" flat. Go to your neighborhood parts store for starters. Ask for body/fender washers. If they just stare at you, go to your local body shop and talk to them. Body/fender washers are very large. You can get a 1/4" centerhole washer that's 1.5" or larger outside diameter. They'll stay put and fix your problem. Seal them well with any type of flexible silicone or "wheel sealer" which is an item used in tire shops. I keep a can of it around for 4 wheeling tire issues.
 
  
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#4  
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Argonne

Argonne

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I actually have a good selection of 1/4 inch washers, and yea, at these pressures there's no such thing as a "blowout"...more like a "sigh, flop flop" followed by strong language.

After thinking about it more, I started wondering about aluminium hardware. A little weight savings will translate to higher speeds before anything noticeable starts happening.
 
   #5  

Big Barn

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I, on the other hand, would have no concern in regards to a blowout. You aren't running extreme pressure so that's not an issue.

I actually think this idea will work. As to the washers, I think you need some rather large flats. Not just your average 1/4" flat. Go to your neighborhood parts store for starters. Ask for body/fender washers. If they just stare at you, go to your local body shop and talk to them. Body/fender washers are very large. You can get a 1/4" centerhole washer that's 1.5" or larger outside diameter. They'll stay put and fix your problem. Seal them well with any type of flexible silicone or "wheel sealer" which is an item used in tire shops. I keep a can of it around for 4 wheeling tire issues.

ovrszd beat me to it. I've done exactly as he described for my JD Gator.

IMG_1064.JPG



Terry
 
   #6  

Industrial Toys

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What's wrong with the inner tube idea? Maybe that and a patch on the inside of the tire.

I got a nasty tear in the sidewall of my front JD 6200 Tire. The tire shop didn't want to fix it. I insisted, they patched it and it has been good for over fifteen years.

I just don't like the bolt idea as there is no give, and the tire does flex. It's like a wave, as it rotates.

What kills me, is that if you tried to get that spike into a tire, while driving, without making up special jigs, you probably couldn't do it.
 
   #7  

George2615

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I think a 1/4" bolt will be too small after looking at the size of the railroad spike. Use a tube or buy a new tire. Installing a bolt won't flex when the tire does.
 
   #8  

BrokeFarmerJohn

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Although I do want you to do the bolt idea just because I haven't heard or thought about fixing a tire like that and wana see how well it holds air. If it was my tire I would have a shop patch it the best they could to protect a tube and put a tube in and hope the wheel doesn't spin on the tire. Best of luck
 

PILOON

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Another thing that works is windshield seal adhesive that they use to seat the glass.
That sticks to anything and simply glue a patch on the inside.

In my area we have a polyurethane caulking (Flextra) that replicates windshield characteristics and have 3 tires patched with that and the have held air for 3 years now.
 
 
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