Saplings and brush around pond banks. Suggestions?

pacosperson

New member
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
18
Location
Southern Pa.
Tractor
Ford 1210
New tractor owner looking for some advice. I have an issue around my pond with some plant I can't recognize that likes to grow right on the water's edge. They can get quite large if left unchecked. I let them get a bit out of hand last summer and had to spend many hours with the chainsaw addressing the issue over the winter. Now there's small stumps and the freaking buggers are starting to come back again. I'd rather not have to back a bushhog up and down the bank over and over and larger the batwings seem like a bit much for my needs. Anyone have any suggestions? would a flail work well?

Note, my tractor doesn't have remotes or a 3rd function, but I've considered adding them, if needed.

Also, I'm aware of the laneshark, but I'm seriously wondering if it's worth the price. For most of my cutting needs, a bushhog would work very well. I only need something like this for the pond banks.

The pond is roughly 5 acres. Some of the bank edges have a ~1 - 2' drop to the water.
Generally anything you cut, chop, lop or whatever will only grow back. If you want to truly eliminate the problem you must simply KILL them. Mentioning a chain saw makes me thing these a bigger than twigs. I have had very good luck drilling a 3/8 hole at a downward angle and squirting a some undiluted brush killer. It will kill the plant and prevent any additional 'suckers'. Weed killer is dangerous to aquatic life. Don't go hosing that stuff around.
 

ArlyA

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2016
Messages
3,993
Location
Houghton MI (the Lake Superior snow belt) USA
Tractor
Polaris Boss 6x6 with pods (tracks) Center actuating lawn mower by Husky
Generally anything you cut, chop, lop or whatever will only grow back. If you want to truly eliminate the problem you must simply KILL them. Mentioning a chain saw makes me thing these a bigger than twigs. I have had very good luck drilling a 3/8 hole at a downward angle and squirting a some undiluted brush killer. It will kill the plant and prevent any additional 'suckers'. Weed killer is dangerous to aquatic life. Don't go hosing that stuff around.
Not necessarily. Here in the northern hardwood forest we have maple shoots everywhere which grow like weeds. We found if we cut them ever year while low, grasses will take over and retard the new tree shoots. But the OP type of brush and climate, I can't comment on what happens there..
 

Smokeydog

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Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
1,434
Location
Knoxville, Tennessee
Tractor
Kubota B26, M59, M5030DT
Another tool that surprised how useful I got about a year ago was a Dewalt 20V polesaw. 8” bar cuts fast and good battery life. Easier than a chainsaw. The reach helps a lot. Keeps me out of the danger zone. Bigger stuff don’t have to cut all the thru will break when grappled. Once a load is grappled easy to trim to carry off. Mostly use with two pole sections. A third section for longer reach. Can carry on the tractor. Chain stretched a lot at first but improved over time. Nobody has mentioned yet is I have a lot of creek banks to maintain.

When I used to cut hay routinely cut 1.5” saplings or branches with a sicklebar mower. Live cut easier than dead. Bigger was iffy to cause tooth damage. HiSpeed MF, belt driven. Always wanted to modify to ssqa mount, FEL, hydraulic powered for a ditch and lane cutter. With HST and better visual up front would help. Road mowing crews used mid and rear sickle bars growing up.
 

gotrocks

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2001
Messages
773
Location
Phenix City Alabama
Tractor
B-2910 delivered 8/23/01
New tractor owner looking for some advice. I have an issue around my pond with some plant I can't recognize that likes to grow right on the water's edge. They can get quite large if left unchecked. I let them get a bit out of hand last summer and had to spend many hours with the chainsaw addressing the issue over the winter. Now there's small stumps and the freaking buggers are starting to come back again. I'd rather not have to back a bushhog up and down the bank over and over and larger the batwings seem like a bit much for my needs. Anyone have any suggestions? would a flail work well?

Note, my tractor doesn't have remotes or a 3rd function, but I've considered adding them, if needed.

Also, I'm aware of the laneshark, but I'm seriously wondering if it's worth the price. For most of my cutting needs, a bushhog would work very well. I only need something like this for the pond banks.

The pond is roughly 5 acres. Some of the bank edges have a ~1 - 2' drop to the water.
From time to time I have the same problem. Used extra strength round-up. Have not noticed any problem with fish/turtles.
 

mark48

New member
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
2
New tractor owner looking for some advice. I have an issue around my pond with some plant I can't recognize that likes to grow right on the water's edge. They can get quite large if left unchecked. I let them get a bit out of hand last summer and had to spend many hours with the chainsaw addressing the issue over the winter. Now there's small stumps and the freaking buggers are starting to come back again. I'd rather not have to back a bushhog up and down the bank over and over and larger the batwings seem like a bit much for my needs. Anyone have any suggestions? would a flail work well?

Note, my tractor doesn't have remotes or a 3rd function, but I've considered adding them, if needed.

Also, I'm aware of the laneshark, but I'm seriously wondering if it's worth the price. For most of my cutting needs, a bushhog would work very well. I only need something like this for the pond banks.

The pond is roughly 5 acres. Some of the bank edges have a ~1 - 2' drop to the water.
Think treating stumps with Tordon is part of solution....they won't come back, but new seedlings need to be treated before they get too big and that means mechanical removal or spray.
 

GVTractorGuy

New member
Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
8
Tractor
LS MT352
I second the Tordon route. We were having what looked like Willow bushes. If you cut them, make sure you get it all out of the water as the cut offs will start new growth elsewhere in your pond. Otherwise, cut them flat and coat the stump with Tordon. Then wait fore the water to drop, assuming a hot, dry summer, then cut the stumps down tight. I've been know to hit them again with Tordon to make certain they do not come back.
 

kenmbz

Elite Member
Joined
May 8, 2019
Messages
2,561
Location
S.E. PA
Tractor
Massey Ferguson GC1720/Simplicity Regents/Echo CS-490/CS-620
I have an M18 Milwaukee Pole saw and a Stihl MS110 brush cutter, Makes good paths for the tractor and getting around the larger dead trees to take them out.
Tractor with toothbar to rip up honeysuckle and other woody brush by the roots. Backhoe if needed for the bigger stumps.
I try not to spray much except the stiltgrass which just starting taking over any disturbed soil and open space in the area.
 

Brily Farms

New member
Joined
Jun 20, 2015
Messages
10
Location
Fountain Inn, SC
Tractor
New Holland TC33DA
New tractor owner looking for some advice. I have an issue around my pond with some plant I can't recognize that likes to grow right on the water's edge. They can get quite large if left unchecked. I let them get a bit out of hand last summer and had to spend many hours with the chainsaw addressing the issue over the winter. Now there's small stumps and the freaking buggers are starting to come back again. I'd rather not have to back a bushhog up and down the bank over and over and larger the batwings seem like a bit much for my needs. Anyone have any suggestions? would a flail work well?

Note, my tractor doesn't have remotes or a 3rd function, but I've considered adding them, if needed.

Also, I'm aware of the laneshark, but I'm seriously wondering if it's worth the price. For most of my cutting needs, a bushhog would work very well. I only need something like this for the pond banks.

The pond is roughly 5 acres. Some of the bank edges have a ~1 - 2' drop to the water.
I have the same problem with two sides of my 3 acre pond. I have found the best method is the bush hog backing up and down the slopes to the water. I plan to rent a Billy Goat next month to mow about 1/4 acre inside the fence from the pasture which is rutted and difficult to mow with the tractor/rotary cutter. Considering the cost of new equipment for a job such as this, you might also consider hiring someone to do the hard work. I am usually able to hire someone by the day to this type of work for a few hundred dollars.
 

AGTtactical

Silver Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
200
Tractor
Kubota SVL95; Kubota L6060HST
New tractor owner looking for some advice. I have an issue around my pond with some plant I can't recognize that likes to grow right on the water's edge. They can get quite large if left unchecked. I let them get a bit out of hand last summer and had to spend many hours with the chainsaw addressing the issue over the winter. Now there's small stumps and the freaking buggers are starting to come back again. I'd rather not have to back a bushhog up and down the bank over and over and larger the batwings seem like a bit much for my needs. Anyone have any suggestions? would a flail work well?

Note, my tractor doesn't have remotes or a 3rd function, but I've considered adding them, if needed.

Also, I'm aware of the laneshark, but I'm seriously wondering if it's worth the price. For most of my cutting needs, a bushhog would work very well. I only need something like this for the pond banks.

The pond is roughly 5 acres. Some of the bank edges have a ~1 - 2' drop to the water.
Sickle bar mower...its the only thing that will give you the reach you need and keep you clear of the bank (other than hydraulic flail on the end of hydraulic arm). I grew up using those on our farm's creek banks. They work really well...not sure way they have fallen out of favor. It's probably because you can't abuse them the way you can with a bush hog. They are really meant for maintaining a field. I've used them in our fields along the creek where the brush was 10 feet tall, but nothing was over 2" in diameter.
 
 
 
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